Zen Yachts

The ZEN50 is a game changer. World’s first series production catamaran equipped with a wingsail, it defines a new distinctive class of its own, where genuine zero-emission meets high comfort and performance, limitlessly. 

Designed from scratch for ZEN Yachts by award-winning naval architect Julien Mélot , this full carbon catamaran is the ultimate essence of technology driven, high performance and luxurious, eco-friendly leisure yachting. 

The blue water capable ZEN50 lightweight racing carbon hulls are combined with a huge solar roof for an unrivaled solar power vs. displacement ratio above 1:1 (18 kW / 17 tonnes), making this yacht completely energy self-sufficient. A revolutionary, fully automated, wingsail - by Ayro© - can be added as a range and speed extender. The yacht’s high capacity battery bank powers a powerful silent electric propulsion, allowing the ZEN50 to achieve 14 knots and maintain high continuous speeds in unrivaled safety and comfort, indefinitely… 

The ZEN50 is offered with or without wingsail and comes in 3 main different versions: Racer, Cruiser and Explorer, each dedicated to a different usage and owner profile. We use these versions as a basis to define a final, bespoke specification for each of our valued clients and ZEN Community Members. Scroll down for more details, specifications and prices.

solar electric sailboat

1st WINGSAIL series production yacht in the world!

The OceanWings32 - by Ayro© - was initially developed for Team Oracle, for the America’s Cup 2010 in Valencia. Over years, it has further been developed and automated by VPLP and was installed on Energy Observer in 2019. Two years of field feedback have allowed the Ayro team to fine tune the algorithm commanding the wingsail. The ZEN50 is the first series production leisure craft to be equipped with this fully automated wingsail. It is controlled at the touch of a finger on screens, is automatically adjusted and has several safety modes and features. The two parts of the wingsail can be hoisted and lowered independently and with the simple touch of a button. The wingsail OceanWings32 is the ideal complement for the solar roof for those wishing to cruise long distances off-shore with zero-emissions.

ZEN50 wingsail and solar powered performance zero emission electric catamaran yacht by ZEN Yachts

Greatest ratio SOLAR POWER / weight on the market

At 17 tonnes lightweight and 18,000 W of peak solar power, the ratio of the ZEN50 is at over 1 kW per displaced tonne of water or beyond 1:1 which is far beyond any other blue water CE Cat A yacht in this size range. Lots of solar power for little water to displace is the strong and healthy foundation the energy self-sufficient ZEN50 is built upon.

ZEN50 wingsail and solar powered performance zero emission electric catamaran yacht by ZEN Yachts

Performance CARBON sandwich hulls

The hulls of the ZEN50 have been designed from a blank screen for ultimate efficiency - understand minimum drag or minimal energy consumption for a range of speeds from 6 to 10 knots. Their shape is aggressive, sharp and slender. Their reverse bows cut through water like a sword cuts through butter and their curvature is reminiscent of graceful dolphin bodies. These hulls are undoubtedly of the performance type and are built with the best available composites: Carbon fibre and Corecell™. The combination of high strength, low weight and performance design allow the ZEN50 to reach speeds of up to 14 knots.

ZEN50 wingsail and solar powered performance zero emission electric catamaran yacht by ZEN Yachts

INFINITE range at high CONTINUOUS speeds

With maximized solar and wind power and minimized energy consumption… the ZEN50 can sail continuously at speeds varying between 6 and 10 knots. Thorough simulations in various sea states and weather system have consistently shown the ZEN50 will be able to achieve performance catamaran speeds continuously without using a genset. With the ZEN50, the world is your oyster and the wildest destinations are within your reach with this self-reliant vessel!

ZEN50 wingsail and solar powered performance zero emission electric catamaran yacht by ZEN Yachts

True ZERO-EMISSION operation

The first ZEN50 unit, whose construction started in March 2023, will not be equipped with a genset at all and will not have any fossil fuels onboard. The ZEN50 energy system with its very large capacity 160 kWh battery bank, has been designed to function for days in complete safety with minimal solar energy harvest and no wind. It is perfectly safe with no backup genset and operates 24/7 without any polluting emissions.

ZEN50 wingsail and solar powered performance zero emission electric catamaran yacht by ZEN Yachts

NO FUEL , no costs

Naturally, requiring no fuel to operate day in day out is great news for the environment, it is also fantastic news when sailing into remote areas where fuel bunkering might be near impossible or where the fuel quality might be an issue. Finally, it also makes a massive difference in this yacht’s costs of operation. Imagine the hundreds of liters of diesel saved over just a week, the obsolete engine maintenance schedules, the clogged filters and dirty tanks from another age… Welcome to a new burden-free, energy self-sufficient era, welcome to clean and graceful eco-yachting, welcome to ZEN Yachts.

solar electric sailboat

Highest SAFETY & reliability

At ZEN Yachts, we have made some design choices to attain energy self-reliance with the ZEN50 that reduces the habitable volume in the hulls, similar to performance catamarans. Where we have not and will never compromise is on safety. Our main voltage system is 48V making it perfectly safe to work on. The level of redundancy of the batteries and solar panels is 10! The main electrical architecture is split in 2 so that should anything happen on 1 hull, the entire vessel can still operate normally. There are 2 independent helm stations and the ZEN50 is packed with special safety features, nonsubmersible compartments and we can even offer an in-depth practical course on safety equipment usage and management. Sailing with the ZEN50 is not only exhilarating and clean, it is ultra safe!

solar electric sailboat

Unrivaled space & COMFORT

The ZEN50 offers the speeds of a performance catamaran, the comfort of a large motor yacht and the simplicity of an electric car. No less than 2 large day beds, 3 dining areas for over 10 people, 1 professional galley and 2 wet kitchens, 5 heads, up to 4 double ensuite cabins, 1 bunk double and 1 single together with both saloon and dining areas converting into extra sleeping areas, this is simply unrivaled on a 50 ft. catamaran. Add an electric tender, dive compressor, satellite internet, 2 helm stations (cockpit and flybridge), a solar roof that converts into a gigantic upper deck to enjoy the most epic sunrises and sunsets, welcome onboard the ZEN50!

ZEN50 wingsail and solar powered performance zero emission electric catamaran yacht by ZEN Yachts

SPECIFICATIONS

Main particulars.

• Length Over All: 15.7m

• Beam: 8.4m

• Depth Molded: 2.7m at midship

• Displacement (light) : 17 T

• Draft (design): 1.3m (4.3ft) incl. keel

• Passenger Capacity: 12

• Berths: 12 (4 x double + 2 x single + saloon)

• Building Material: Carbon Fiber - Corecell™ composite

• Certification: CE Cat A - Unrestricted with 12 persons

Note: Some of the above figures may vary between versions

PROPULSION & ENERGY

• Propulsion: 2 x 50 kW brushless DC motors

• Main Battery Pack Capacity: 160 kWh Lithium

• Solar Roof Peak Power: 18 kWp

• Wingsail: Oceanwings® OWS 3.2 by Ayro©

• Backup Battery Pack Capacity (Nav/Com/Wing): 5 kWh Lithium

• Main System Voltage: 48V - Low voltage for total human safety

• Accommodation Voltage: 110V or 220V

SPEED & RANGE

• Max. Speed on e-motor only: 10 kn

• Max. Speed on e-motor & Wingsail: 14 kn

• Cruising Speed for continuous operation - solar only: 4.5 - 5 kn

• Cruising Speed for continuous operation - solar and wing: 6 - 10 kn

• Cruising Speed day time: 8 - 10 kn

• Range Over 24 h: 180+ nm

Note: These values may vary between versions and sea / weather conditions

EQUIPMENT INCLUDED - RACER VERSION

• Integrated power management system

• Solar power & energy storage system

• Electric propulsion system

• By-wire steering system

• Helm stations at cockpit & flybridge

• Galley counters, storage, sink, oven, stove, fridge, freezer

• 4 en suite heads with enclosed shower, toilet, sink & faucet (in each head)

• All cabin furniture (as shown in layouts)

• Aft deck fixed dining table and aft sofa with collapsible back rest (as shown in layouts)

• Fore deck day bed and lateral seats (as shown in layouts)

• Outdoor marine cork decking / indoor saloon natural bamboo decking

• All cushions In/Outdoor upholstered with Sunbrella® fabric

• 6 deck hatches

• 2 x 500 liter (2 x 132 gal) fresh water tanks

• 2 x 100 liter approx. (2 x 26 gal) fresh water tanks + 1 fresh water pump

• 2 x 350+ liter approx. (2 x 92 gal) holding tanks

• Railings, cleats and fore deck trampolines

• Mooring equipment: 33 kg Rocna® stainless steel anchor + 50 m stainless steel chain 10 mm + 150 m nylon rope + e-windlass

• Regulatory navigation equipment including navigation lights & mast

• 2 x chart plotter 16”; 2 x VHF with DSC button

• Regulatory Life Saving Appliances

• Critical spare parts kit

Note: The above equipment is for the Racer version. Cruiser & Explorer versions carry additional equipment

ZEN50 Solar Wingsail Electric Catamaran - Solar Roof Layout

ZEN50 Solar Wingsail Electric Catamaran - Solar Roof Layout

ZEN50 Solar Wingsail Electric Catamaran - Flybridge Layout

ZEN50 Solar Wingsail Electric Catamaran - Flybridge Layout

ZEN50 Solar Wingsail Electric Catamaran - Main Deck Layout - Asymmetric D (subject to changes)

ZEN50 Solar Wingsail Electric Catamaran - Main Deck Layout - Asymmetric D (subject to changes)

ZEN50 Solar Wingsail Electric Catamaran - Cabin Layout - Asymmetric D (subject to changes)

ZEN50 Solar Wingsail Electric Catamaran - Cabin Layout - Asymmetric D (subject to changes)

ZEN50 Solar Wingsail Electric Catamaran - Cabin Layout - Asymmetric E (subject to changes)

ZEN50 Solar Wingsail Electric Catamaran - Cabin Layout - Asymmetric E (subject to changes)

SOLAR & WINGSAIL

OCEAN RACER

Solar & Wingsail, basic configuration ready to sail, navigation, safety, fridge, etc.

EUR 2 400 000

WORLD CRUISER

Solar & Wingsail, well equipped configuration with, among other options, electric tender, AC and water maker

EUR 2 650 000

ARCTIC EXPLORER

Solar & Wingsail ultimate configuration with all available options

EUR 2 850 000

Solar only, ready to sail basic configuration with navigation, safety, fridge, etc.

EUR 1 850 000

CONTINENTAL CRUISER

Solar only, well equipped configuration with, among other options, electric tender, AC and water maker

EUR 2 100 000

TROPICAL EXPLORER

Solar only, ultimate configuration with all available options

EUR 2 300 000

Ready to reserve your ZEN50?

Want more information .

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The Promises and Pitfalls of an All-Electric Yacht

  • By Tim Murphy
  • Updated: November 8, 2021

Arcona 435Z

This past October, I saw one of the most interesting exhibits in more than 500 new cruising sailboats I’ve reviewed over two decades. It was the Arcona 435Z, built in Sweden and introduced by Graham Balch of Green Yachts in San Francisco. Balch describes his business as “a new brokerage dedicated to the electric revolution on the water,” and it was the “Z” in the boat’s name, which stands for “zero emissions,” that made this boat so interesting. This was the first electric propulsion system—not hybrid but all-electric —I’d ever seen on a cruising sailboat.

Electric propulsion isn’t new. Since 1879, electric motors have propelled boats; a fleet of some four-dozen electric launches transported visitors around the 1893 Colombian Exposition in Chicago. But cruising sailboats are not launches, and the open sea is not a protected canal. When we’re using cruising boats as they’re meant to be used, they seldom end their day plugged into a shore-power outlet. Cruising boats comprise many devices —stove, refrigerator, freezer, windlass, winches, autopilot, radar, lights—whose power typically comes from a tank of fossil fuel. And today’s cruising sailors are accustomed to using diesel auxiliary power to motor through lulls or punch into headwinds and seas.

Starting about 15 years ago, we saw a wave of diesel-electric and hybrid propulsion systems on production and custom cruising boats ( see “Perpetuated Motion,” CW , March 2005 ). Both of those systems ultimately start with an onboard internal-combustion engine. A diesel-electric propulsion system relies on a running genset to directly power the electric motor that turns the propeller. A hybrid system relies on batteries to power the electric motor, plus an internal-combustion genset to recharge the batteries. One of the promises of a hybrid system is the ability to regenerate electrical power. Regeneration means using boatspeed under sail to turn the propeller, whose spinning shaft sends electrons from the electric motor back through an electronic controller to recharge the batteries. In such a system, the boat’s propeller is both an electrical load (when running under power) and a charging source (when sailing in regeneration mode).

The Arcona 435Z was different from both of these systems: It incorporates no onboard fossil-fuel engine at all. Instead, it has a bank of lithium batteries, several solar panels, and a proprietary propulsion leg that looks like a saildrive. “This boat,” Balch said, “has the very first production unit in the world of Oceanvolt’s newest electric propulsion system, called the ServoProp.”

lithium-ion batteries

For our sea trial, Balch was joined by Derek Rupe, CEO of Oceanvolt USA. “If you can sail the boat and you have some solar, you can go anywhere in the world, and you can make all your power underway while you go,” Rupe said. When we spoke in October 2020, he touted three high-profile sailors who were using the Oceanvolt electric propulsion system: Alex Thomson, for his Hugo Boss Open 60 Vendée Globe program; Jimmy Cornell, for his Elcano 500 expedition; and Riley Whitelum and Elayna Carausu, who had been teasing their new boat for months on their popular Sailing La Vagabonde YouTube channel.

The efficiency of Oceanvolt’s ServoProp and the regeneration from it is the promised game-changer in each of these boats. The ServoProp is a leg with a ­feathering propeller that can be set for optimal pitch in three modes: forward, reverse and regeneration.

“You don’t need fuel,” Rupe said. “You don’t need to dock; you can go anywhere you want to go and always have the power for living and propulsion.”

That’s the promise. But are there also pitfalls?

Innovation and Risk

Marine electric propulsion is an emerging technology. Compared with the mature and settled technology of diesel engines and lead-acid batteries, electric-propulsion systems—with their electronic controllers and lithium batteries—are in a stage of development best described as adolescent. Every sailor has his or her own tolerance for technical innovation. For the promise of fewer ­seconds per mile, grand-prix-racing sailors willingly trade a high risk of expensive damage to the sails, rig or the boat’s structure itself; cruising sailors, by contrast, tend to favor yearslong reliability in their equipment as they seek miles per day.

Folks who identify as early adopters take special joy in the first-wave discoveries of a new technology; if they’re clear-eyed about supporting an ongoing experiment, they see themselves as partners with the developers, accepting failures as opportunities for learning. Sailors motivated primarily by changing the trajectory of climate change might be especially willing to modify their behavior to limit their own output of greenhouse gases. Investing in any emerging technology asks you to start with a clear assessment of your own risk tolerance. We’ll return to this theme with one or two real-life examples.

Oceanvolt system

The American Boat and Yacht Council, founded in 1954, sets recommended standards for systems installed on recreational boats. For decades, ABYC has published standards related to installations of diesel and gasoline engines, as well as electrical systems based around lead-acid batteries. By contrast, it was only three years ago that ABYC came out with its first electric-propulsion standard (revised July 2021). And only last year it published its first technical-information report on lithium batteries (a technical-information report is an early step toward a future standard). The takeaway is that if you need help servicing your diesel engine or electrical system built around lead-acid batteries, you can pull into any reasonable-size port and find competent technicians to help you. With electric propulsion and lithium batteries, that pool of skilled talent is significantly scarcer.

ServoProps

To say that a technology is mature simply means that we’ve learned to live with it, warts and all, but that it holds few remaining surprises. Certainly, diesel-propulsion and lead-acid-battery technologies each leave plenty of room for improvement. When a charge of fuel ignites in the combustion ­chamber of a diesel engine, some three-quarters of the energy is lost in heat and the mechanical inefficiencies of converting reciprocating motion to rotation. Lead-acid batteries become damaged if we routinely discharge more than half of their capacity. During charging, they’re slow to take the electrons we could deliver.

Lithium batteries are comparatively full of promise. Their power density is far greater than that of lead-acid batteries, meaning they’re much lighter for a given capacity. They’re capable of being deeply discharged, which means you can use far more of the bank’s capacity, not merely the first half. And they accept a charge much more quickly; compare that to several hours a day running an engine to keep the beers iced down.

Oceanvolt motor controllers

But the pitfalls? Let’s start with ABYC TE-13, Lithium Ion Batteries. Some of its language is bracing. “Lithium ion batteries are unlike lead-acid batteries in two important respects,” the report says. “1) The electrolyte within most lithium ion batteries is flammable. 2) Under certain fault conditions, lithium ion batteries can enter a condition known as thermal runaway, which results in rapid internal heating. Once initiated, it is a self-perpetuating and exothermic reaction that can be difficult to halt.”

Thermal runaway? Difficult to halt? Self-perpetuating?

“Typically, the best approach is to remove heat as fast as possible, which is most effectively done by flooding the battery with water,” TE-13 continues, “although this may have serious consequences for the boat’s electrical systems, machinery, buoyancy, etc.”

If you were following the news in January 2013, you might remember the ­story of Japan Airlines Flight 008. Shortly after landing at Boston’s Logan Airport, a mechanic opened the aft ­electronic equipment bay of the Boeing 787-8 to find smoke and flames billowing from the auxiliary-power unit. The fire extinguisher he used didn’t put out the flames. Eventually Boston firefighters put out the fire with Halotron, but when removing the still-hissing batteries from the plane, one of the ­firefighters was burned through his ­professional protective gear.

Victron Energy Quattro

Samsung Galaxy cellphones, MacBook Pro laptops, powered skateboards—in the past decade, these and other devices have been recalled after their lithium batteries burned up. In that period, several high-end custom boats were declared a total loss following failures from lithium batteries. In March 2021, a 78-foot Norwegian hybrid-powered tour boat, built in 2019 with a 790 kW capacity battery bank, experienced thermal runaway that kept firefighters on watch for several days after the crew safely abandoned the ship.

Yes, experts are learning a lot about how to mitigate the risks around lithium batteries. But we’re still on the learning curve.

ABYC’s TE-13 “System Design” section starts, “All lithium-ion battery ­systems should have a battery ­management system (BMS) installed to prevent damage to the battery and provide for battery shutoff if potentially dangerous conditions exist.” It defines a bank’s “safe operating envelope” according to such parameters as high- and low-voltage limits, charging and discharging temperature limits, and charging and ­discharging current limits.

Graham Balch takes these safety recommendations a step further: “To our knowledge, the BMS has to monitor at the cell level. With most batteries, the BMS monitors at the module level.” The difference? “Let’s say you have 24 cells inside the battery module, and three of them stop working. Well, the other 21 have to work harder to compensate for those three. And that’s where thermal events occur.”

Balch followed the story of the Norwegian tour boat this past spring. He believes that the battery installation in that case didn’t meet waterproofing standards: “The hypothesis is that due to water intrusion, there was reverse polarity in one or more of the cells, which is worse than cells simply not working. It means that they’re actively working against the other cells. But if the BMS is monitoring only at the module level, you wouldn’t know it.”

On the Green Yachts website, Graham lists five battery manufacturers whose BMS regimes monitor at the cell level. “If I were sailing on an electric boat, whether it be commercial or recreational, I would feel comfortable with having batteries from these five companies and no other,” he said.

The broader takeaway for today’s sailors is that lithium batteries bring their own sets of problems and solutions, which are different from those of conventional propulsion and power-supply technologies. A reasonably skilled sailor could be expected to change fuel filters or bleed a diesel engine if it shuts down in rough conditions. With lithium-ion batteries aboard, an operator needs to understand the causes and remedies of thermal runaway, and be ready to respond if the BMS shuts down the boat’s power.

Real-World Electric Cruising Boats

When we met Oceanvolt’s Derek Rupe a year ago, he and his wife had taken their all-electric boat to the Bahamas and back the previous season. Before that, he’d been installing electric-propulsion packages for six years on new Alerion 41s and other refit projects. “My real passion is on the technical side of things—installations, really getting that right. That’s half the picture. The technology is there, but it needs to be installed correctly.”

When talking to Rupe, I immediately encountered my first learning curve. I posed questions about the Oceanvolt system in amps and amp-hours; he responded in watts and kilowatt-hours. This was yet another example of the different mindset sailors of electric boats need to hold. Why? Because most cruising boats have just one or two electrical systems: DC and AC. The AC system might operate at 110 or 220 volts; the DC side might operate at 12 or 24 volts. On your own boat, that voltage is a given. From there we tend to think in terms of amps needed to power a load, and amp-hours of capacity in our battery banks. Going back to basics, the power formula tells us that power (watts) equals electrical potential (volts) times current (amps). If your boat’s electrical system is 12 volts and you know that your windlass is rated at 400 watts, it follows that the windlass is rated to draw 33 amps.

But an all-electric boat might comprise several systems at different voltages. A single battery bank might supply cabin lights at 12 volts DC; winches and windlasses at 24 volts DC; the propulsion motor at 48 volts DC; and an induction stove, microwave and television at 110 volts AC. A DC-to-DC power converter steps the voltage up or down, and an inverter changes DC to AC. Instead of translating through all those systems, the Oceanvolt monitor (and Derek Rupe) simply reports in watts coming in or going out of the bank.

“We keep all our thoughts in watts,” Rupe said. “Watts count in the AC induction. They count in the DC-to-DC converter. They count the solar in. They count the hydrogeneration in. And the ­power-management systems tracks it that way for shore-power in.

“On a boat like this, maybe I have 500 watts coming in the solar panels,” he continued. “So then I can think: ‘Well, my fridge is using 90 watts. My boat has an electric stove. When I cook a big meal, I can see that for every hour we cook, we lose about 10 to 12 minutes of our cruising range.’”

During his Bahamas cruising season, Rupe observed that on days that they were sailing, the combination of solar panels and hydroregeneration supplied all the power he and his wife needed. “When we weren’t sailing,” he said, “we found that we were losing 8 percent each day, in the difference from what the sun gave us to what we were using for the fridge, lights, charging our laptops, and all that stuff.”

Rupe’s solution? “Twice in Eleuthera and once outside Major’s, we went out and sailed laps for a couple of hours because the batteries were below 30 percent of capacity. It was good sailing, and the wind was coming over the shore, so we didn’t have any sea state. We did a couple of hot laps on nice beam reaches, and generated about 700 watts an hour.”

Of the three sailors Rupe touted in October 2020—Alex Thomson, Jimmy Cornell and the Sailing La Vagabonde couple—only Cornell can report back on his all-electric experiences with Oceanvolt. Alex Thomson ended his circumnavigation abruptly last November, just 20 days after the Vendée Globe start, when Hugo Boss collided with an object in the South Atlantic. And at press time in early fall 2021, Riley and Elayna had just recently announced the build of their new Rapido trimaran; keep an eye on their YouTube channel for more about their experiences with the Oceanvolt propulsion system.

Oceanvolt ServoProp

As for Cornell—circumnavigator, World Cruising Routes author, creator of the transoceanic rally, and veteran of some 200,000 ocean miles—he suspended his planned Elcano 500 round-the-world expedition solely because of the Oceanvolt system in his new Outremer catamaran. His Aventura Zero Logs on the Cornell Sailing website, particularly the Electric Shock article posted on December 2, 2020, are essential reading for any sailor interested in sailing an electric boat. “Sailing around the world on an electric boat with zero emissions along the route of the first circumnavigation was such a tempting opportunity to do something meaningful and in tune with our concern for protecting the environment that my family agreed I should do it,” Cornell wrote. “What this passage has shown was that in spite of all our efforts to save energy, we were unable to regenerate sufficient electricity to cover consumption and top up the batteries.”

Cornell’s experience in that article is raw, and his tone in that moment bitterly disappointed. We recommend it as essential reading—not as a final rejection of the electric-boat concept or of Oceanvolt’s system, or even as an endorsement of Cornell’s own decision that the system didn’t work. I suspect that I may have arrived at the same conclusion. Yet given the same boat in the same conditions, one imagines that a new breed of sailor—a Graham Balch or a Derek Rupe—may have responded differently to the constraints imposed by an all-electric boat, as nearly every cruising sailor today habitually responds to the inconvenient constraints of diesel engines and lead-acid batteries.

“If you bring electric winches, electric heads and an induction stove, and then sail into a high-pressure system, you’ll set yourself up for failure,” Balch said. “You have to balance your power inputs and your power outputs.

“Sailing an electric boat is a return to the tradition of sailing that the crutch of a diesel engine has gotten us away from,” he added. “Magellan’s fleet got all the way around the world, and they didn’t have a diesel engine.”

Tim Murphy is a Cruising World editor-at-large and ­longtime Boat of the Year judge.

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Solar-paneled yacht navigating the seas using solar energy

The award-winning entry to solar-electric yachts

As the successor to the Silent 64 (the first ever solar powered production yacht to cross the Atlantic Ocean during January of 2018), the 60 Series is equipped with the most refined, efficient and clever technology available today. Being a multi-award winner, including the prestigious “Best of Boats Award” in the category of ‘Best for Travel’, she embodies solar electric yachting in its purest form. Available in a variety of deck and cabin options, the Silent 60 is ideally suited for families cruising with or without additional crew.

multihull award winner 2022

Specifications

Deck options, silent 62 flybridge.

Silent 62 flybridge yacht side view

The flybridge version with a retractable roof offers enough space for a dining area with a small lounge and a dedicated helm station. For owners who do not need the additional space of the 62 3-deck configurations, the flybridge version offers enough space and outstanding 360° visibility.

Silent 62 3-Deck Open

Silent 62 3 deck open flybridge yacht side view

An additional open deck instead of the flybridge combines the benefits of larger catamarans with the compact dimensions of the 60 Series. The open sky lounge is a fantastic outdoor community space, equipped with a full dining area including a panoramic view and a superyacht atmosphere.

Silent 62 3-Deck Closed

Silent 62 3 deck closed flybridge yacht side view

The closed version of the 62 3-Deck further develops her character as a compact superyacht. Providing additional indoor space, the closed third deck is available in two options: a choice between a sky lounge or an exclusive owner’s deck makes sure it can be tailored towards individual needs.

Electric catamaran with solar panels on the roof

Model variations

Exterior of a yacht with front master exit

Front Master Version

  • Available for every deck option (flybridge, 3-deck open & 3-deck closed versions)

The Master cabin is located below the bow in the front of the main deck. This replaces the additional exit in the front of the salon.

Exterior of a yacht with front front exit

Front Exit Version

Hereby the salon on the main deck is equipped with an additional exit in the front. The Master cabin moves to the side of the hull in the lower deck.

Boat saloon on the main deck

3-Deck Open

Yacht sky lounge area plan

3-Deck Closed

Yacht owners suite area plan

Front Master

Yacht main deck front master area plan

Solar-electric yachting advantages

Unlimited range, noiseless cruising, zero emission, minimal maintenance, powertrains, 6o series highlights.

Electric catamaran with solar panels on the roof and a kyte system

Kite sail system

Adding the option of a fully automatic towing kite gives the 60 Series the opportunity to make use of the wind without shading the panels. The either 9m² or 12 m² sized kite flies at heights where winds are much stronger, thus being able to create up to 10x more pulling power compared to a conventional sail.

Two men enjoying a glass of champagne on the flybridge of an electric boat

Self-sufficient lifestyle

Designed from the ground up to be fully autonomous. By being able to produce your own energy and water while making use of coolable food supplies for storage as well as a worldwide internet connection, you have the possibility of creating a fully self-sufficient lifestyle on board.

Aft bridge deck storage of a catamaran

Bridgedeck storage

Under the bridge deck, there are two spacious storage boxes for SUPs, surfboards, small RIBs or compact sailboats. Both of them can be accessed either from the aft cockpit deck or directly from the hydraulic tender lift.

Master bedroom on the upper deck of a boat

Owner's suite

Being able to design the 60 Series with an exclusive owner’s suite on the 3rd deck us unique amongst 60-foot catamarans. The suite itself is fully equipped with an en-suite bathroom and measures 23 m² in size. It also gives direct access to the 36 m² lounge area in the aft.

If you would like to enquire about this electric yacht and get in touch with a member of our team, please click on the button below.

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Electric boats.

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I drove a rare solar-electric yacht to test clean-sea propulsion, here’s how it went

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While we at Electrek often tend to focus on electric vehicles taking over roads, it’s important to remember that our inevitable abandonment of fossil fuels stems to all modes of transportation, whether it’s by land, air, or even the sea . I recently had the opportunity to set sail on Sunwater Marine’s Ramblin’ Rose , a 40-foot sailing yacht powered by solar panels and electric propulsion. It’s one of the only vessels of its kind on the West Coast.

Sunwater Marine is a San Diego-based nautical transportation company with a keen focus on spreading the benefits of renewable energy and electric propulsion to sea dwellers.

It was founded by president James Richmond in 2020, amid the global pandemic. Richmond had a little more free time to search for a boat for blue water cruising to which he could add solar.

James has been sailing for over 50 years, and has nearly 40 years of experience in the renewable and energy-efficiency industry.

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He soon found a 2015 Leopard 40 Catamaran and initially planned to simply add solar panels for an electric range and an energy-efficient water maker.

However, James soon discovered viable options for electric propulsion, and began researching the possibility of converting his new yacht to be be solar-electric.

The result is the Ramblin’ Rose , a catamaran that can haul 12 passengers and sleep up to nine. It also happens to be one of the only solar-electric yachts in the West Coast.

I got the chance to take the solar-electric yacht out of beautiful Coronado and test the technology out myself.

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The Ramblin’ Rose solar-electric yacht

As previously mentioned, Sunwater Marine’s Ramblin’ Rose is centered around a Leopard 40 catamaran, built by Robertson & Caine in South Africa. Richmond then put an additional $100k into a renewable energy conversion, equipping the yacht with solar panels, and electric motors.

While the original catamaran came with some traditional solar panels, Richmond’s experience in renewable energy told him that would not suffice for his solar-electric yacht.

He added lighter and more flexible solar technology from Sunflare , the first company to successfully mass-produce thin, durable CIGS (copper indium gallium selenide) solar panels.

The Sunflare panels on the Ramblin’ Rose operate individually with their own bypass diode, so if one is shaded (by the sail for example), the rest still work.

Richmond also separated the solar panels into three separate zones, so if one side of the boat is shaded, the other two are still harnessing the sun’s power back into the boat’s batteries.

He also showed me how durable these advanced solar panels were, as I was able to walk around on top of them without worrying about breaking any glass or ruining them.

The panels help charge the electric yacht’s battery packs while out sailing and indicate to the captain when they are doing so.

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Electric propulsion and battery packs

To help power this vessel in and out of the marina and on the sea, Sunwater Marine’s president researched electric propulsion systems around the world, and decided that OCEANVOLT was the best option.

The solar-electric yacht now features two OCEANVOLT 15 kW ServoProp sail drives , utilizing unique propeller blades that can change pitch to optimize efficiency and even regenerate power.

The software controlled variable system adjusts the pitch of each of the propeller blades automatically, so that the power generation and output are always optimal. This is much more efficient than traditional fixed propellers.

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The electric propulsion is powered by a 48 volt system, meaning it’s safe to touch without electrical shock (an ideal situation for maritime fun).

Each electric motor on the yacht is powered by a bank of 12 Lithium Iron Phosphate (LFP) batteries on each side, 24 total. The batteries provide 21 kWh of power on each side of the vessel, 42 kWh in total.

Richmond explained that he positioned each battery pack eight inches off the bottom of the boat, too, so if any water were to come in, the batteries would still be OK. Furthermore, the captain showed me backup storage of eight additional batteries should anything go awry at sea.

The status of each and every battery is monitored 24/7 by a supervisory battery management system (BMS) that will shut the battery bank down, should any individual battery begin to malfunction. Fire is not something you want on a boat, despite being surrounded by water.

Additionally, the system was implemented to safely operate minimal electric functions under any conditions, so if the electric yacht were to tip over, there would still be power to send a distress signal.

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Thoughts on the future of electric propulsion

After manning the helm of the the Ramblin’ Rose , there is a lot to be excited about for the future of electric propulsion at sea , especially on a gorgeous yacht.

The ride itself was eerily smooth and quiet compared to diesel motors, with zero vibration throughout the boat. If you didn’t look back and see the wake of the electric motors, you might not even notice the yacht was being propelled.

There is a lot of potential in electric propulsion, especially as it pertains to propellers than can remotely change their angle like the OCEANVOLT ServoProps. This makes reversing the electric yacht in particular, much easier for captains compared to fixed props built to push forward.

The ability to set sail and regenerate power from the propellers is also a huge perk and pairs nicely with the advanced solar panels. Plus, you always have shore power as a backup when you’re in a pinch.

From what I’ve seen, the biggest hurdle looking ahead will be battery capacity, and providing enough stored energy to power the electric propulsion systems on the yacht.

The solar panels do help a lot, but it’s a relatively slow process. Smaller, lighter battery options will be crucial for longer distances at higher speeds at sea someday. In the meantime however, we still have sun and wind to pick up the slack.

Currently, the range and top speed are still limited by this lack of surplus energy below deck. We didn’t take the Ramblin’ Rose above 7.5 knots (~8.6 mph) because we didn’t want to burn through all our battery life (that was also in respect to the charter setting sail after us that day).

The solar-electric yacht still has diesel motors onboard for emergencies, but Sunwater Marine’s founder agreed with me that we’d like to see a day when those motors are not needed at all. Unfortunately, the technology is not quite there yet.

Luckily, people like Richmond and Sunwater Marine are using their knowledge and resources (and personal funds) to figure this stuff out for the masses, while spreading the word about electric propulsion. It has become a genuinely viable option at sea, even if it is only in support of other forms of propulsion like sailing for now.

If you’re ever visiting the San Diego area, I highly recommend reaching out to Sunwater Marine and chartering the Ramblin’ Rose , or one of the other solar-electric yachts Captain Richmond is working on.

FTC: We use income earning auto affiliate links. More.

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Scooter Doll is a writer, designer and tech enthusiast born in Chicago and based on the West Coast. When he’s not offering the latest tech how tos or insights, he’s probably watching Chicago sports. Please send any tips or suggestions, or dog photos to him at [email protected]

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  • May 17, 2024

Unveiling the Worlds First 44ft Solar Electric Superyacht at Sanctuary Cove International Boat Show

luxury yachting, eco-conscious design, solar electric superyacht, sustainability, groundbreaking innovation Get ready to embark on an electrifying journey with us! Since 2018, we’ve been blazing trails in the world of luxury yachting, and now, we’re thrilled to unveil Australia’s inaugural solar electric superyacht, the SUNPOWER 44. Join us at the Sanctuary Cove International Boat Show …

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  • December 26, 2023

Sunpower Yachts 44: A Revolutionary Solar Electric Yacht that Defies All Odds

Introduction: YOU TUBE VIDEO CLICK HERE The world of sustainable transportation has witnessed a groundbreaking innovation in the form of the Sunpower Yachts 44, a solar electric yacht that defies conventional limitations. This remarkable vessel, capable of traveling over 4 hours round trip with no fuel, relies solely on solar power to navigate the seas. …

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  • December 10, 2023

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Unveiling the Worlds First 44ft Solar Electric Superyacht at Sanctuary Cove International Boat Show

2022 Sanctuary Cove International Boat Show – SUNPOWER 44 Reveal

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  • Electric Philosophy: A New Solar Electric Powercat Sails on the Sun

The Concept, Design, and Application of a New Solar Electric Powercat.

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Ed and Eileen Pauley launched their new custom 40-foot powercat, Electric Philosophy , this July. They’ve been living aboard and cruising the Salish Sea for the better part of two months and have yet to plug into shore power. They have not refueled, because they have no fuel tank. Ed and Eileen are solar sailors, and they are successfully cruising a self-sustaining platform.

Electric Philosophy is a Sam Devlin design and build, but Ed and Eileen are responsible for the concept of the boat and most of the implementation of its solar-electrical systems. The Pauleys call the midwest home, but their vision has Pacific Northwest roots. Ed and Eileen were visiting Ed’s cousin Phil — who lives in Port Townsend and is also a partner in the boat — for the Wooden Boat Festival when they wound up speaking with local electric outboard innovator and entrepreneur, Joe Grez. Inspired by Grez’s ideas and stories about solar sailing, and fueled by curiosity honed in their professions as a scientist (Ed) and an engineer (Eileen) — the Pauleys started learning and dreaming.

Eileen and Ed did not have lengthy backgrounds as boaters. They are paddlers, regularly taking backcountry canoe trips in Minnesota’s Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness. Their main “cruising” experience, however, was land-yachting in an Airstream camper. Serendipitously, their Airstream explorations brought them along the waterways of the Inside Passage and Alaska on three separate occasions; they would ferry from port to port and camp nearby. All of this provided assurance that not only did Ed and Eileen enjoy traveling together in a small, mobile abode; but they also wanted to see more of the exquisite Inside Passage.

Dutifully, the Pauleys researched their options on a variety of levels. This even included the purchase of an Albin single-screw trawler, aboard which they began doing short cruises, educating themselves about boating and boat systems, and translating their Airstream knowledge into nautical skills.

Resolved to pursue a new solar-electric concept, they began inquiring about a number of production boat options, both mono- and multi-hulls. Nothing seemed quite right. Harkening back to connections made at the Wooden Boat Festival, Ed and Eileen contacted designer and builder Sam Devlin in Olympia, Washington.

Devlin recalled their early conversations and described the idea and undertaking as, “very different and brave.” Though he has built a dedicated solar electric boat in the past ( Wayward Sun completed a solar voyage to Alaska and back this summer), he still acknowledged that it’s “difficult to wrap your head around” the notion that it will never need to be fueled up.

solar electric sailboat

The conversation continued, and soon the project was taking shape. Though Devlin has mostly built and designed monohulls, the evident advantages of a catamaran in this application — especially to accommodate some of the Pauleys’ desires — were inescapable. Ed and Eileen were very focused on self-sufficiency and redundancy. The architectural space in the catamaran allowed for enormous battery banks and very large water and waste tanks in the hulls.

One would be correct in assuming that a catamaran has the possibility of greater efficiency under electric power since it has less wetted surface. Devlin says that this is likely the case, but there’s variability in reality and expectation because of questions about overloading. According to Devlin, “a monohull would be more forgiving to different degrees of loading.” Presuming the Pauleys can resist packing the boat full of gear, they should have a more efficient boat. Devlin noted that generally, “solar electrics have to be much more like a sailing hull — in other words, they can’t drag their ass around.” It required discerning design when it came to things like exit lines on the hull, since Electric Philosophy will always be a displacement boat; enough power output to push a boat onto a plane is not part of the solar plan. All up, the boat displaces around 25,000 pounds, which means it is stoutly built, but not a tank.

Likely the single greatest attribute of a catamaran, though, is surface area. The boat’s beam of 15-feet 3-inches and coachroof width of 15-feet 6-inches were drawn to perfectly fit the maximum number of solar panels. Save for a couple of cabin hatches, the cabin-top is wall-to-wall solar.

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Structurally, the boat is “immensely strong,” says Devlin. Ensuring strength, while also being courteous to time-effectiveness and cost, several components were sourced from outside Devlin’s shop. Notably, they purchased fiberglass beams that provide the structure between the hulls. These turned out to have added benefit in achieving a higher bridge-deck clearance as well, since they are comparatively lower-profile than the plywood beams Devlin makes in his shop. But mainly, the build is typical Devlin — high-end, elegant, plywood, and finished to exacting standards.

In terms of liveability, the Pauleys stipulated simplicity and low maintenance. There is no exterior brightwork. There aren’t even any thru-hulls. The only holes in the hulls are for the electric drives. The boat is drawn and built to be plenty sea worthy for the waters of the Inside Passage and Alaska.

Electric Philosophy ’s interior is an open concept, with a berth aft, head and separate shower midship to starboard and port respectively, the galley and dining area forward from there, and the helm station at the bow. The boat has walkable side decks, a generous aft deck, and a small bow deck that is well elevated thanks to Devlin’s attractive rising sheer line. The cabin sole follows these lines, rising slightly underfoot as you walk from the galley to the helm. Visibility from the helm is excellent with large windows offering almost 360° views.

Lots of the interior decisions were made with significant input, and sometimes craftsmanship, from Ed and Eileen. The wood trim throughout the interior is walnut sourced from around their home in Iowa, including some walnut lumber from their own property. Eileen made and upholstered the cushions throughout the boat. They chose appliances based on their Airstream experience — the “gravity” head system, the galley stove, and lighting throughout, among others. Between this involvement and the fact that the solar electric system was of their own design, Devlin said simply, “I have never had a project where the owners were as involved on a day-to-day basis as Ed and Eileen were. We didn’t have any difficulties with that.”

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So, how is Electric Philosophy powered? In a word, impressively. The boat is home to four enormous battery banks. Each hull has a house bank and a drive bank. Each house bank is composed of 16 100Ah Lithium batteries grouped together in parallel, and there are eight of those groups in series making 24 volts. Each drive battery bank is made up of eight 200Ah cells grouped in parallel, and 16 of those groups in series to make 48 volts. The drive banks power a 26-horsepower equivalent electric motor in the starboard hull and a 13-horsepower equivalent electric motor in the port hull.

The coolest part about all of this is that it actually works. I was fortunate enough to have Ed and Eileen take me out from Cap Sante Marina in Anacortes on a partly sunny October afternoon. Frankly, the whole experience was incredibly inspiring. I had to remind myself throughout that this boat has never been plugged in — in fact, because of a supply chain delay, at the time of our excursion, it still couldn’t be plugged in.

Once we were off the dock in our benign autumn conditions, the boat was generating a fair amount of solar power, though not quite as much as we were using. At their normal cruising speed between 5.5 and 6 knots, the propulsion drives were using about 3kw each. Of that, the sun was putting in about 1.5kw and the batteries were providing the other 1.5kw. If we throttled up above 7 knots, the draw increased to 4.5kw from the batteries. This was October, though, and the seasonal position of the sun and the patchy clouds didn’t provide ideal solar generation opportunities. With full summer sun, they can generate as much as the drives require to go closer to 7 knots.

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The boat has a very nice motion, and I was reminded that Devlin has built several other catamaran ferries, including the Admiral Jack , which is now in use as a teaching vessel at Seattle’s new Maritime High School. So, this workboat style is one to which he brings familiarity and experience. The motors were quiet, though Ed and Eileen are already looking for ways to make them quieter.

For any cruising boat, range is a critical factor. They chose massive battery banks because they didn’t want to think about their range in hours; they wanted to think in days. Though the situation would never realistically come up, Ed and Eileen estimate that the boat should be capable of about 40 hours at normal cruising speeds without any solar generation.

Ed and Eileen call themselves solar sailors and, like any sailor, their philosophy is very responsive to the environment around them. Ed cleverly pointed out that the sun is responsible for wind, anyway, so as he says, “all sailors are solar sailors.” Electric Philosophy ’s careful balance between generation and consumption leads the Pauleys to travel with cooperative wind and current as much as possible, as well as with the sun. They call it “life in the slow lane” and they love it.

With a few months in their wake, it all seems to be going great. Electric Philosophy is beautiful. The concept is successful. Next year, they plan to explore farther north and into more remote areas, powered entirely by the sun. And I bet I’m not the only one who’ll think about their journey with admiration and jealousy.

This article originally appeared in the November 2021 issue of 48° North.

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Joe Cline has been the Managing Editor of 48° North since 2014. From his career to his volunteer leadership in the marine industry, from racing sailboats large and small to his discovery of Pacific Northwest cruising —Joe is as sail-smitten as they come. Joe and his wife, Kaylin, welcomed a baby girl to their family in December 2021, and he is enjoying fatherhood while still finding time to sail, make music, and tip back a tasty IPA every now and again.

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Soel Yachts

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IN-HOUSE SYSTEM

From the very inception of the first line drawing, each element of our solar electric boats is purposefully and intricately designed and engineered to achieve the utmost efficiency in clean solar electric propulsion. Our engineering team possesses a unique skill set encompassing electric naval architecture and electrical system integration, resulting in unparalleled performance and endurance.

Our electric propulsion systems excel in terms of power density and system weight. With an average of just 1 kg per kilowatt (1 kg/kW), our PMS electric drive train stands as the lightest and most powerful system in its class. This achievement is built on our extensive experience in ocean-going solar electric naval architecture and photovoltaic (PV) and energy storage systems, a legacy that dates back to 2007, and it’s now powering our solar electric yachts to perfection.

PREMIUM QUALITY

Marine-grade lithium-polymer batteries serve as the robust foundation of our system, complete with comprehensive safety features. Our integrated systems showcase modular, semi-custom lithium-polymer batteries ranging from 24V up to 800Vdc, ideal for high-power applications. With a proven track record of over 15 years on our vessels, these batteries are renowned for exceptional quality, energy density, and reliable operation, making them well-equipped to meet your power needs.

MAINTENANCE

With only one moving part the electric system is basically maintenance free compared to any conventional fossil fuel powered motor. This allows for less headache about replacements of engines or dirty oils and results in a substantial amount of money saved at the end of every single year.

The total cost of ownership of the solar electric boats is approximately 20% of what a conventionally powered vessel costs over the years for operational costs (fuel), maintenance costs (consumables, service parts, etc.) and rebuild costs (investment for new engine after several hours of operation).

TECHNICAL SUPPORT

For complete peace of mind our dedicated customer services team is always on standby. Offering remote technical support and advice for every Soel Yachts owner is one of our highest priorities. We are in this together. Working with the latest software for updates and troubleshooting enables us to keep your modern boat on the highest standards. Whether you require warranty support, spare parts, system upgrades or a service visit anywhere in the world , our competent service team is not far away and pleased to help you further with what you need.

All of Soel Yachts sustainable electric boats are equipped with Naval DC’s smart technology for an integrated monitoring and alarm and control systems, the Naval UI.

SMART FUNCTIONALITY

All of our sustainable vessels are equipped with smart technology for an integrated monitoring, alarm & control system.  The user interface can be viewed on a range of monitors or smart devices  — even your phone or tablet. It presents all relevant system data from your electric boat and enables us to offer remote monitoring and service support.

MOBILE POWER STATION

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Our solar electric boats can even be used as  mobile power stations and provide AC inverter power for the mainland. The excessive solar energy can be used to feed back energy to the grid .

Most resorts use desalination systems to produce fresh water for laundry, showers and cleaning — an average energy consumption of 3 kWh for every m3 of water produced. Plug the SoelCat 12 into your grid and you can make the equivalent of 2000L fresh water with the harvested energy, per hour. The mobile power capabilities allow you to be fully energy autonomous without the need for any extra generator!

Electric boat SoelCat 12, called Okeanos Pearl is operating at the Bora Bora Pearl Beach Resort

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Yachting Monthly

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Everything you need to know about yacht solar power

Dennis O'Neill

  • Dennis O'Neill
  • May 23, 2024

Marine solar panels are becoming more efficient and eco-friendly. Dennis O’Neill reports on the latest design advances

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Keeping your batteries topped up without having to run the engine is a continuous challenge for cruising sailors, especially those who are highly conscious of their carbon footprint or just wanting to cruise ‘off grid’.

Solar panels have been a good option for sustainable sailing in sunny conditions for some time, being almost maintenance-free and, unlike wind generators, silent. However, maritime conditions are a harsh test for even the best of them due to the incessant exposure they face from saltwater spray and, ironically, ultraviolet (UV) energy.

Now, though, new solar panel technology coming over the horizon promises further improvements in both their efficiency and ease of use.

Silicon cells

Most solar panels use silicon-based photovoltaic cells, with the most efficient type within this class being monocrystalline cells, made from a single pure ingot of silicon. Polycrystalline silicon cells, made from multiple silicon crystals bonded together, perform almost as efficiently as monocrystalline cells but are less expensive to produce.

Ordinary photovoltaic cells, meanwhile, which are the most commonly used, are much cheaper, lighter, and easier to mount where structural flexibility is needed.

The downside, though, is that their intrinsic chemical materials tend to be more environmentally hazardous and difficult to recycle at their end-of-life.

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The latest solar panels can even be installed on a fabric canopy. Photo: Tor Jonhson

Perovskite revolution

The new buzz of excitement in the solar panel sector is coming from the development of perovskite solar cells, which promise 50% more efficiency than conventional photovoltaic solar cells in converting sunlight into electricity. They also have the extraordinary potential of being used in a liquid form, such as paint, and even being printed onto compatible surfaces.

Researchers are now reported to be trialling spray-on perovskite solar cells that could be applied as a tint for windows. The production of perovskite solar cells is also less energy-intensive than conventional solar cells and can be achieved at room temperature using relatively abundant and cost-effective base materials.

Article continues below…

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How to convert a yacht to electric propulsion

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Rigid Solar panels

Rigid solar panels currently on the market remain the most efficient and well-suited for mounting on larger boats with flatter surfaces. However, they are heavier, more awkward to mount, and can’t be walked on, so unless you have a hard top or dedicated gantry aft, you’re better off choosing a more resilient semi-flexible option.

Rigid solar panels are covered with impact-resistant glass in a metal frame, and often require hardware to install. Over time, the hardware and frame can corrode in unforgiving marine conditions, so it’s important to choose one with added weather protection.

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Solar is well suited to use in yachts. Photo: Catchlight Visual Services / Alamy Stock Photo

Flexible Solar panels

Flexible solar panels, meanwhile, have become increasingly popular with yacht owners due to their versatility and adaptability. While not yet as efficient as rigid panels, they do offer a more eco-friendly and cost-effective option as well as being thin, light, bendable, and easy to install or mounted on almost any surface. You can, for instance, attach flexible solar panels easily to soft biminis and even sails.

However, attaching them to flexing surfaces may cause physical strain on the internal cells, causing damage in the long run. They also tend to have efficiency levels below 20% (compared to just above 20% for rigid solar panels), so they require more physical space to produce similar amounts of output.

They are usually encased in plastic coverings to make them more impact-resistant, but the plastic can degrade due to salt and UV.

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Thin solar cells installed on a teak deck. Photo: Graham Snook / Yachting Monthly

Semi-flexible Solar panels

These are ideal for curved boat surfaces. The plastic covering on semi-flexible panels makes them highly resistant to impact and weight, in case you accidentally step on them while moving around a swaying boat.

Kite concept

Sailing enthusiasts working at the German engineering firm FLIN, based in Kiel, have developed a new broad range of versatile marine solar panel systems.

Products within the range include: the FLINrail, a rigid solar panel that can be used while sailing by being hooked onto a boat’s guardrails; the FLINstripe, designed to be mounted along a boom’s lazy bag using Velcro strips; and the FLINkite, a thin lightweight design comprised of up to six square panels that can be hoisted on a halyard and then tilted towards the sun using simple guide lines.

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FLINkite can be hoisted vertically on a halyard and tilted towards the sun using simple guide lines

One owner who cruises a 40ft Fountaine Pajot Lavezzi catamaran in European waters has found that his FLIN installations have benefitted his cruising enormously.

‘We have four FLINflex panels mounted permanently on our built-in bimini, which produces around 450 watts while we’re sailing,’ he explains. ‘Then, when we’re at anchor or in port we can also set our FLINkite, which has six panels, each of which can produce up to around 50 watts.

We have a solar controller for each of the two systems and I’m able to monitor how well the systems are generating power using an app on my smartphone. Overall, the FLIN panels cover all of our electricity requirements, including our fridge and electric windlass. We’ve even now treated ourselves to an electric kettle!’

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Foldable solar panels inspired by satellites

Origami Inspiration

Another exciting and innovative concept comes from two highly experienced sailors, Kim-Joar Myklebust and Sara Plaga, based in Milan, Italy. Together, they have designed and begun producing an origami-style marine solar panel made of recycled carbon fibre.

‘The idea came out of frustration,’ explains Kim-Joar. ‘We had regular power shortages on our sailing trips, even after we’d installed a large and bulky solar system which couldn’t keep our boat’s batteries charged.

‘As a motorsport design engineer I saw how space satellites used large solar panels that folded outwards to increase the area exposed to the sun, so I started cutting and folding a piece of paper until I found a shape I felt could work as a compact, fold-out solar panel on a boat.’

The couple’s firm, Levante, tested the effectiveness of their origami panels extensively aboard a 36ft cruising yacht, finding that their new product was 20% lighter than other foldable solar panels and 40% more compact, whilst producing only half of the CO2 footprint.

‘We’re determined to revolutionise the entire concept of marine solar panels,’ adds Sara. ‘You can use our origami solar panels in many different ways – just fold them up and use them on your boat, or at home, or anywhere you like.’

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It’s vital you connect your solar panel to your battery via an electronic charge controller to prevent the battery overcharging

Solar panel maintenance

Solar panel efficiency is compromised by both salt water and long-term exposure to UV and high temperatures. Industry experts advise that good regular maintenance will improve a solar panel’s performance by around 15%.

You should clean solar panels early in the morning, while they are at their coolest, as cleaning them when they are warm or exposed to direct sunlight can cause internal thermal stresses. Always use distilled or de-ionized water to avoid the formation of mineral stains or deposits on the surface of the panels, and avoid using harsh chemicals or abrasive solvents that could scratch the photovoltaic cells.

Let the panels air dry or use soft cloths, and make sure no water residue is left. You should also check regularly for cracks, breaks or loose connections.

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Solar electric boats

Silent cruising

Discover a new way of boating with LASAI. Zero noise. Zero emissions. Experience silent cruising on our solar electric boats, a sustainable and eco-friendly alternative.

  • Up to 15 knots speed
  • Up to >100NM range
  • From €59,400 taxes excluded

Our planet needs us to take it easy. We design electric boats that are environmentally friendly and are at the forefront of sustainable mobility. Our boats have been meticulously designed down to the last detail. Our planet needs us to take it easy. We design electric boats that are environmentally friendly and are at the forefront of sustainable mobility. Our boats have been meticulously designed down to the last detail.

Lasai

Electric recreational boats

Set sail towards a sustainable future Set sail towards a sustainable future

Lasai 22 GL

LASAI 22 GL

Recreational boat for coastal cruising. Maximum speed of 15 knots and >100NM (at 6 knots) of range.

Lasai 20 GL

LASAI 20 GL

Recreational boat for coastal cruising. Maximum speed of 15 knots and >100 NM (at 6 knots) of range.

Lasai 20 CR

LASAI 20 CR

Recreational boat for lakes, rivers and waterways. Maximum speed 6 knots and 8 hours of range.

Silence is the essence of cruising

Lasai in the media lasai in the media.

LASAI combines the pleasure of navigating with respect for the environment.
With a clear commitment to a modern and environmentally sustainable model, they integrate solar-electric technology for their propulsion and operation (original in spanish)
Longest range at medium speed: a Lasai boat can cover 100 miles at a stretch at 6 knots. At 8 knots it reaches 48 miles and at full speed, 26 miles (original in spanish)
Lasai boats cruises without the need for batteries as long as there is sunlight (original in spanish).
Lasai seizes the market opportunity: renewable solutions for boating (original in spanish).
Each Lasai boat avoids the emission of one ton of CO2 into the atmosphere every year (original in spanish).
The future of boating is decarbonization, zero emissions and respect for the environment (original in spanish).
A new way of mobility and leisure, more sustainable, silent, peaceful and environmentally friendly (original in spanish).
Growing social awareness and regulatory trends, makes necessary to seek environmentally friendly means of transport (original in spanish).
It makes sense to slow down and enjoy the journey without noise, fumes or smells (original in spanish).
Lasai uses organic and recycled materials in its boats. The systems are setup to be gentle with the environment and marine biodiversity (original in spanish).
Its main model achieves up to 40 kWh of on-board power and around 700 W of solar panels, with speeds of around 12 knots and a range of ten hours with continuous recharging on sunny days (original in spanish).
Lasai 20 is an electric propulsion boat powered by solar photovoltaic energy with length variants between 5.99 and 6.80 meters and an attractive design (original in spanish).
The Lasai 20 generates up to 1,500 Wp of power through photovoltaic solar energy (original in spanish).
The Lasai boats are not only more sustainable than traditional recreational vessels but are also silent and do not emit fumes, improving the on-board experience for passengers and crew (original in spanish).

Discover the purest form of boating. Embark on a new journey. Discover the purest form of boating. Embark on a new journey.

Lasai

Solar power, electric motor

Advantages of choosing LASAI Advantages of choosing LASAI

Sustainability.

LASAI boats are powered by electric and solar energy, helping to reduce emissions and the impact on the environment. But that’s not all – there is no noise pollution as the boat cruises silently, respectful with the sea and with marine life.

From the moment you start a LASAI boat’s electric motor you will start accumulating savings in terms of fuel and maintenance and make a positive impact on the ecosystem It's a smart investment for you and for the environment from the outset.

Our boats reflect our passion for the sea and innovation, and also for meticulous design. Sleek curves and polished lines in our decks and exteriors. Beauty and elegance reside in the small details, on display as you cruise smoothly.

Reliability

Our solar electric boats offer quality you can feel. Our boats are put through stringent production and management processes, and this can be felt onboard. Because silent cruising requires a reliable boat.

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Boat Specifications

  • Resort & Rental Business

SolarCat

Solar-Electric Chaise Lounge Catamaran

Quiet relaxation on the water.

SolarCat solar-electric catamarans are manufactured in a small, rural town in Northern California by a family-owned business with over 30 years in the industry. We pride ourselves on a quality product and exceptional customer service.

QUALITY construction eco-friendly

Proudly made in the USA

Solar-electric, motorized pontoon boat designed for a relaxing, innovative ride on the water.

solarcat soalr boat

HOW TO PURCHASE YOUR SOLARCAT

Purchase a solarcat catamaran directly from the manufacturer via one of the following methods, over the phone | email | in person.

(Click for details)

RESORT and RENTAL

Unique beach rental product

Generate rental revenue from the easy-to-drive, low-maintenance SolarCat personal catamaran.

solarcat small catamaran

RENTAL LOCATIONS

Try before you buy, or just enjoy a day on the water on a mini catamaran! Click on the map for rental locations

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Tel. 530-626-0100

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Email: [email protected]

Follow us on instagram, @solarcatusa.

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Stay prepared for your next adventure with SolarCat's convenient storage compartments! Keep your essentials dry and secure while also chilling your snacks and drinks in the built-in ice chest! #SolarCat #SolarPowered #Solar #Catamaran #SubSeaSystems

Resort & Rental Business

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solar electric sailboat

100% solar powered boats

When you own an Elvene, you’re free to use it in any weather. It has unlimited range, makes no noise and doesn’t smell. No maintenance or charging is required either. Pretty awesome.

Curious about the future of solar-powered boating?

Get our e-book “MAKING SOLAR WAVES” for free

By subscribing to our exclusive newsletter you get direct access to Making Solar Waves , our 40-page e-book that is packed full of info about the current state of solar tech and boating trends. You also automatically participate in our Great Giveaway of 2024, with a chance of winning your very own solar-powered boat!

By signing up you agree to our terms and conditions and our privacy policy .

E bok mockup2

  • Why are electric boats experiencing rapid growth?
  • How do solar-powered boats behave when there’s no sunlight?
  • What role does solar power play in the global push towards sustainability and a cleaner future?
  • And much more

By subscribing to our exclusive newsletter you get direct access to Making Solar Waves , our 40-page e-book. You also automatically participate in our Great Giveaway of 2024, with a chance of winning your very own solar-powered boat!

Elvene Amber on the waves

Live free and easy.

Our smart and fun solar powered boats are sustainable, easy to use and provide modern sea lovers with peaceful and quiet freedom.

Elvene’s drivetrains will take you at least 20 NM, even if you’d be riding inside a cave – which in all honesty sounds just like the kind of cool thing a real Elvene pirate would do.

Amber website

Fulfil your naval dreams with Amber, our super-light flagship model that combines the practicality and offshore capabilities of a Center Console with the comfort and overnight possibilities of a Day Cruiser. With her two independent motors, built-in easy-to-use infotainment system, seating for 7 and cuddy cabin, Amber provides you with everything you need to enjoy real freedom on the seas.

  • Length 6,2 m
  • Width 2,1 m
  • Weight 750 kg
  • Top speed 15 knots
  • Cruising speed 11–15 knots
  • • Cuddy cabin in bow (2 persons) • Infotainment system for easy operation 
• Infinite range at low cruising speed, 20 NM at high cruising speed • Fireproof LifePo4 battery 
• Security via Amber app
 • Constant connection via 4G 
• Two independent motors

Greta v2 3

You don’t have to be big to make a difference. Greta is Elvenes’ entry level turn key solution, making electrical boating available for everyone! She’s maintenance-free, unsinkable and extremely easy to use. With her centerized battery and antiskid solar panels, Greta is just as perfect as a well-balanced fishing machine as she is for the family day trip. Available with or without a steering console.

  • Length 4,7 m
  • Width 1,4 m
  • Weight 150 kg
  • Approved for 3 ppl
  • Top speed 5 knots Minimum reach 20 NM/day
  • Price: from 5.500 €

The smarter choice

Solar powered electrical boats are gaining popularity as more people want to keep the waters clean and reduce their carbon footprint. These boats offer many benefits over traditional gas-powered boats, from cost savings to environmental protection. Here are some of the reasons why you should consider buying a solar electric boat.

Solar electric boats are eco-friendly

As opposed to gas-powered boats, solar electric boats produce zero emissions, which means that they do not pollute the air or waterways. This is especially important when boating on waterways where wildlife and plant life are vulnerable to pollution. Solar electric boats are a great way to enjoy boating while reducing your carbon footprint and protecting the environment.

You save money

Another great reason to buy a solar electric boat is that they can save you money in the long run. Solar electric boats require very little maintenance. The cost of electricity is zero, since the boat produces it by itself with the integrated solar panels. Over time, the savings on fuel and maintenance costs will easily offset the higher initial investment.

They're quiet

Solar electric boats are much quieter than traditional gas-powered boats. This is because electric motors produce less noise than gas engines, which means that you can enjoy a peaceful, quiet ride on the water. This is not only enjoyable for you and your passengers, but it is also less disruptive to wildlife and other boaters.

You get improved performance

Solar electric boats offer instant torque, which means that they can accelerate more quickly and reach higher speeds faster. Additionally, electric motors offer smoother and more consistent power delivery, which makes for a more comfortable and enjoyable ride. Furthermore, electric motors require no warm-up time, which means you can set off on your boating adventure right away.

You get innovative technology

Solar panels have come a long way in recent years, and modern solar electric boats are powered by high-quality, durable solar panels that can withstand harsh marine conditions and can be walked on. Investing in a solar electric boat is a way to stay on the cutting edge of boating technology while also doing your part to protect the environment.

About Elvene

With a love for open waters and centuries of boat building heritage in our blood, Elvene was founded on the idea to bring a fresh, environmentally friendly dimension to boating.

Finland’s Jakobstad, the hometown of Elvene, is internationally known for its boat building traditions both old and new. Centuries ago wooden ships built in the small coastal town circumnavigated the globe and still today the most prestigious sailing yachts in any marina around the world has most likely been built in Jakobstad. 

We welcome you to join us on our exciting journey, as we commit to building a better world for future generations by cherishing that beautiful heritage while simultaneously embracing and adapting new sustainable tech.

The future is bright, sunny and filled with adventures.

We’d love to hear from you. Don’t hesitate to get in touch if you consider ordering an Elvene or just want to ask us something.

Emil Finne, CEO [email protected] +358 (0) 44 777 7269

Elvene Alholmsvägen 72 68600 Jakobstad Finland

© 2024 Elvene Boats

CleanTechnica

Solar Sal Electric Boat Cruises All Day On Nothing But Sunshine

The Solar Sal 24 electric boat can cruise all day on sunshine alone. Sure it has batteries onboard that can be used to power the boat after dark or when there is no sunshine, but by careful attention to the natural world, 10 people can enjoy a day on the water and never burn a drop of fuel or stop to recharge. It may be the perfect way to be out on the water and be part of nature rather than speeding through the natural world leaving a plume of pollutants in your wake.

Solar Sal is the brainchild of David Borton, a physicist and retired professor at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute who has focused on solar power from its early beginnings. His Sustainable Energy Systems in upstate New York focuses on solar power and Borton has now made Solar Sal Boats a division of that business. For him, an important benefit of solar power is the chance to eliminate the use of fossil fuels that contribute to climate change.

He tells Arthur Paine of Maine Boats he has been involved in the development of several aspects of electric boating including direct current motors, batteries, battery charge controllers, displacement hull shaping, and solar panels. He says Solar Sal 24 and other electric boats like it will allow mariners to enjoy uncomplicated, quiet, reliable performance, while maintaining a clear conscience.

A key factor for Borton has been optimizing the overall efficiency of the power through direct current channels between the panels and the motor. Once he combined all that with a specially designed hull, he applied for and was awarded a patent.

Specifications & Specifics

The Solar Sal is 24′ long and 7′ 6″ wide with a draft of only 1′ 8″. Just as designers of electric automobiles concentrate on aerodynamic efficiency to improve range, designer Dave Gerr focused on creating a hull that would slip easily through the water. He actually went back to the design of naptha-powered launches from the 1800s whose needs for an efficient hull shape were similar.

The boat is powered by a 3 kW (4 hp) electric motor from Torqueedo, which also supplied 4 lithium-ion batteries with a total capacity of 14 kWh. The key to the electric boat is the canopy above that provides space for 4 solar panels with a maximum capacity 350 watts each for a total of 1,400 watts. That’s enough to cruise all day at around 5 knots without every tapping the energy stored in the batteries. List price for a Solar Sal is $124,500.

Why Would You Want One?

Borton is fully committed to solar power and a sustainable planet. He lives in a home powered by solar panels on the roof of his barn. “I didn’t just want to prove something,” he says. “I wanted people to have available a practical invention, one that is kind to the environment, and which could also be a commercial success.”

The first boats are being built at Belmont Boatworks near Belfast, Maine. Owner Dan Miller has already completed two more hulls that are waiting for customers. He says they will be ideal on lakes, especially ones with speed or horsepower restrictions. On many of those lakes, pontoon boats chug around all day long at around 5 knots but burning gasoline all the while. A Solar Sal 24 would fit right in, maintaining just the right pace to appreciate the scenery and while not scaring the wildlife.

If fishing floats your boat [pun intended], you can do it all day long at the ideal trolling speed of 4½ knots while consuming only photons, electrons, and bait. “The boat’s silence wouldn’t hurt your prospects or bother your neighbors,” Arthur Paine says. You also never have to worry about an explosion on board, something that is always a possibility with a gasoline powered boat.

Paine adds that while it is technically a powerboat, “It appeals to the sailor in me in that the boat is quiet, environmentally benign, and uniquely suited to a lifestyle remote from the concerns of the shoreside world because it doesn’t require a link to the electrical grid for recharging, and is therefore independent of fossil fuel. You could go exploring for weeks in the wilderness, without any concern about accessing the next gas pump or recharging station.”

Although the solar panels charge less vigorously on a cloudy day, according to builder Dan Miller from Belmont Boatworks the replenish rate is sufficient to go all day at five knots. “That’s familiar territory to a sailor.” Paine says. “Another similarity with sailboats is that most sailors I know are reputed to be parsimonious — a nice word for cheap. As fossil fuel becomes ever more expensive, Solar Sal’s owner gets to take a permanent pass.”

Paine thinks boats like this could be used as ferries in sun-washed places like the Bahamas. “There are many short ferry runs in the Bahamas where speed is unnecessary, and workers, townspeople, and tourists go back and forth all day long. Given the ample sunlight, a Solar Sal 24 could serve that route well. And you don’t even want to think about the price of gasoline [those places].” It is the first 100% solar powered boat to be approved by the US Coast Guard to carry passengers.

A Little History

Sustainable Energy Systems has previously built a handful of one-off wooden boats in different sizes. Solar Sal 24, a fiberglass production boat, is the next step. In addition to the prototype, two more hulls have been built and will be fitted out at Belmont Boatworks to the customer’s specifications. Borton is experimenting with a fifth model, a 16-footer that actually planes with a modest, 10 kW (13.5 hp) motor. His largest is a 44-footer that has been licensed by the Coast Guard to take paying passengers for rides on the Hudson River from its home port in Kingston, New York. Another of his boats, a 40-footer, made a cargo trip the length of the Erie Canal.

That is a key part of the story. A popular folks song back in the days when the Erie Canal was a thriving conduit for commerce featured these lyrics: “I’ve got a mule and her name is Sal. Fifteen miles on the Erie Canal. She’s a good old worker and a good old pal.”

The 40-foot-long Solar Sal Two actually carried cargo on a portion of the original canal, the first time a boat powered by the sun ever did the job that was originally assigned to mules. The name stuck. This video has some interesting historical photos to accompany the lyrics.

One of Borton’s concepts, a 27-footer built for Borton and his son, Alex, by Sam Devlin in Olympia, Washington, made the long passage through Alaska’s Inside Passage to Ketchikan and Glacier Bay. Even though bright sunlight is a rarity up there, Alex appreciated that as long as the sun rose, he did not need to worry about running out of gas.

People who own an electric car will relate to this next part. “It’s fun tracking the variables of an electric boat , basically a mix of watt-hours of stored potential in the batteries balanced with kilowatts of replenishment coming in from the roof. All electric boats have a “fuel gauge” in the form of a battery condition indicator. It’s up to the driver to select an appropriate combination of speed and range. A clever operator of a Solar Sal can trade speed for range. With enough patience, a solar-electric drive boat will always get home,” Borton says.

In Search Of A Sustainable World

Probably nothing illustrates the difference between a sustainable world and one that depletes natural resources faster than they can be replaced than a sailboat. When you are out on the water dependent entirely on the wind (or lack thereof), a bond develops between you and nature that simply cannot be replicated in any boat powered by an internal combustion engine. You will get there when you get there and no amount of oaths or carefully contrived invective will advance your progress one iota. A favorite expression among sailors is “We cannot control the wind. All we can do is adjust our sails.”

There is a benefit that comes from letting go of the constraints imposed on us by our fossil fuel powered environment and voluntarily submitting to the strictures of the natural world. It can provide us with a sense of tranquility and harmony and help us reconnect with nature in a way that is missing in much of our daily lives. Solar Sal 24 fits nicely with that vibe.

Hat Tip to Ken Anderson of Marblehead, Massachusetts, who first brought this story to my attention. Ken, Art Paine, and I grew up sailing on Narragansett Bay back when “I Like Ike” buttons were popular. It’s interesting how our early experiences intersect and loop back on each other over the passage of time. 

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Steve hanley.

Steve writes about the interface between technology and sustainability from his home in Florida or anywhere else The Force may lead him. He is proud to be "woke" and doesn't really give a damn why the glass broke. He believes passionately in what Socrates said 3000 years ago: "The secret to change is to focus all of your energy not on fighting the old but on building the new." You can follow him on Substack and LinkedIn but not on Fakebook or any social media platforms controlled by narcissistic yahoos.

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></center></p><ul><li>View All Boats</li></ul><p>At Navalt, we’re at the forefront of revolutionizing the fishing industry by pioneering electric catamarans—an innovation poised to redefine the field. Our history, steeped in diesel-powered vessels, is now evolving with our latest breakthrough, the SRAV (shark in Malayalam). The SRAV stands as the world’s first solar-electric fishing boat, embodying our commitment to innovation and sustainability. Collaborating with the Shell Foundation, we’re embarking on the construction of 100 solar-electric fishing vessels, dedicated to reshaping the industry while elevating the livelihoods of fishing communities worldwide.</p><p>Efficiency Redefined</p><p>Our flagship SRAV solar-electric catamaran is meticulously designed to significantly reduce operational costs, thereby boosting fishermen’s earnings. Powered by the MAKO 12 kW electric motor, the SRAV effortlessly glides through the sea at an impressive speed of 7 knots—setting a new benchmark in its class. Embracing the SRAV means a seamless fishing experience without the burden of fuel expenses or maintenance costs, maximizing profitability for fishermen.</p><p>Environmental Commitment</p><p>Beyond economics, the SRAV embodies our commitment to sustainability. Its solar-electric power system drastically reduces carbon emissions, ensuring a cleaner and greener fishing environment. By transitioning from traditional diesel to renewable energy, we’re contributing to a healthier ecosystem while embracing modern technology.</p><p>Empowering Fishing Communities</p><p>The introduction of the SRAV marks a significant shift for fishermen facing a formidable challenge: soaring fuel expenses. This financial burden severely impacts their revenue. By integrating the SRAV into their daily operations, fishermen can transform these colossal fuel expenses into substantial profits. This transformation not only ensures a better livelihood but also opens avenues for sustainable growth within their communities.</p><p>Safety and Stability at Sea</p><p>The SRAV stands as a testament to safety and stability in the maritime domain. Meticulously engineered to navigate in rough seas with waves reaching up to 2 meters in height, its catamaran design guarantees unparalleled stability during operations. This design not only ensures safety but also minimizes water drag, maximizing operational efficiency.</p><p>Unlike traditional fishing boats, the SRAV is equipped with state-of-the-art safety features, capable of accommodating up to 6 crew members and carrying an impressive 2 tonnes of catch. Its construction from long-lasting marine-grade FRP composite ensures a smooth operational lifespan of 20 years, surpassing the durability of traditional wooden or steel fishing boats.</p><p>Join the Solar-Powered Revolution</p><p>Navalt welcomes you to embrace the SRAV—a vessel that not only enhances profitability and sustainability but also prioritises safety and stability at sea. Join us in revolutionising the fishing industry, ensuring better livelihoods, and securing a prosperous future for fishing communities worldwide.</p><p><center><img style=

6 passengers

solar electric sailboat

10 m long x 3.6 m wide

solar electric sailboat

Max speed of 7 knots

solar electric sailboat

Range 70 km

solar electric sailboat

Battery Choices

Power your boat experience with your choice of battery: the DNV certified Manta, build for professional operations, or the Ray, designed for carefree leisure operations.

solar electric sailboat

Manta LFP batteries packs are DNV approved, meeting stringent quality quality and safety standards. It is rated upto IP 67 standards.​

solar electric sailboat

Ray is a safer LFP marine grade battery pack designed and built for leisure grade operations

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IMAGES

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COMMENTS

  1. ® OFFICIAL Silent Yachts

    The Original Solar Yacht. As the original inventors of series produced solar-electric yachts, we pioneered this innovative approach. Our first model, the Silent 64, was launched to the market in 2016, several years before any other shipyard considered the possibility of going electric.

  2. SOEL YACHTS

    electric models . The Soel Yachts portfolio offers solar electric catamarans for both private and commercial applications. With the vast experience gathered trough different projects worldwide and boats successfully performing on a daily basis for many years, we gladly can discuss individual requirements and find the ideal solution for your preferred electric yacht and destination

  3. ZEN50 Solar & Wingsail Electric Catamaran

    The blue water capable ZEN50 lightweight racing carbon hulls are combined with a huge solar roof for an unrivaled solar power vs. displacement ratio above 1:1 (18 kW / 17 tonnes), making this yacht completely energy self-sufficient. A revolutionary, fully automated, wingsail - by Ayro© - can be added as a range and speed extender.

  4. Solar electric catamaran

    The SoelCat 12 is an energy autonomous solar electric boat, designed from the ground up as a fully sustainable excursion vessel to enjoy the sea. The solar catamaran brings true eco-tourism to water-bound operators, communities, resorts, lagoons and nature reserves. With no CO2 or noise emissions involved, we can save the ocean and offer a ...

  5. Advanced electric yachts

    ALVA Yachts, the German builder of luxury electric solar catamarans and sail boats, has announced it is currently building the world's first fuelless 90ft superyacht catamaran with wings, the OCEAN ECO 90 H2. The first superyacht catamaran to run without fossil fuels and producing zero emission, the OCEAN ECO 90 H2 is designed with luxury ...

  6. Ocean Eco 60

    The perfect mid sized electric solar catamaran. The OCEAN ECO 60 is an innovation packed solar assisted electric long-range cruiser that will perfectly suit customers who like to cruise and explore while yachting.Designed with luxury, safety and cruising comfort in mind, it is an example of the latest technological developments in the field of self-sufficient yachts surpassing its competition ...

  7. Soel Senses 62

    Welcome the Soel Senses 62, a fully sustainable solar electric yacht for silent cruising with trans-ocean capabilities. State of the art technology is combined with modern design, to offer the highest comfort and pleasure on board, while providing an extremely sustainable way of cruising the oceans. With no noise distractions on board, the 62ft ...

  8. ALVA Yachts introduces new 78-foot solar electric catamaran

    ALVA Yachts 'launches' its latest solar electric boat. The sustainable boatbuilder unveiled the OCEAN ECO 78 in a press release today - a multihull yachts that measures in at 23.7 meters ...

  9. Solar Electric Boats

    Micah Toll Jul 17 2023 - 5:28 am PT. 10 Comments. The Portuguese company Faro Electric Boats has just pulled the cover off of the new Faro PowerDock. The off-grid electric dock and boat lift is ...

  10. The Promises and Pitfalls of an All-Electric Yacht

    Imported into the US ­market by Green Marine, the Swedish-built Arcona 435Z is a rarity: an all-­electric cruising sailboat. Jon Whittle. This past October, I saw one of the most interesting exhibits in more than 500 new cruising sailboats I've reviewed over two decades. It was the Arcona 435Z, built in Sweden and introduced by Graham Balch of Green Yachts in San Francisco.

  11. Electric yachts

    The award-winning entry to solar-electric yachts As the successor to the Silent 64 (the first ever solar powered production yacht to cross the Atlantic Ocean during January of 2018), the 60 Series is equipped with the most refined, efficient and clever technology available today.

  12. Tested: Silent 55 Solar-Electric Power Catamaran

    The hull I sea trialed in late 2019 was powered by twin 250-kW e-motors, giving it a solid cruising speed of 10 to 12 knots. Under solar power alone, the yacht makes 5 to 6 knots. Among the many things that make the Silent 55 unique are the 30 solar panels arrayed on its coach roof.

  13. Sailing with solar power: A practical guide

    THE AVAILABLE SPACE. In practical terms, a modern 40ft monohull would have the space for around 1,200W of PV panels (cockpit arch, sprayhood top, deck), maybe 1,500W with the addition of a few portable panels for use at anchor. The 1,200W of fixed position solar array could produce around 360Ah on a sunny summer's day (zero shading) or more ...

  14. I drove a rare solar-electric yacht to test clean-sea propulsion, here

    The electric propulsion is powered by a 48 volt system, meaning it's safe to touch without electrical shock (an ideal situation for maritime fun). Each electric motor on the yacht is powered by ...

  15. Home

    2022 Sanctuary Cove International Boat Show - SUNPOWER 44 Reveal. We are excited to announce Australia's first solar electric superyacht, SUNPOWER 44 that will be revealed to the public at Sanctuary Cove International Boat Show for the for the very first time, as we increase our global presence in 2022. Visitors to the show, running from 19 ...

  16. Electric Philosophy: A New Solar Electric Powercat Sails on the Sun

    Electric Philosophy's interior is an open concept, with a berth aft, head and separate shower midship to starboard and port respectively, the galley and dining area forward from there, and the helm station at the bow.The boat has walkable side decks, a generous aft deck, and a small bow deck that is well elevated thanks to Devlin's attractive rising sheer line.

  17. Solar electric propulsion for solar electric boats

    Our electric propulsion systems excel in terms of power density and system weight. With an average of just 1 kg per kilowatt (1 kg/kW), our PMS electric drive train stands as the lightest and most powerful system in its class. This achievement is built on our extensive experience in ocean-going solar electric naval architecture and photovoltaic ...

  18. Everything you need to know about yacht solar power

    Rigid solar panels currently on the market remain the most efficient and well-suited for mounting on larger boats with flatter surfaces. However, they are heavier, more awkward to mount, and can't be walked on, so unless you have a hard top or dedicated gantry aft, you're better off choosing a more resilient semi-flexible option.

  19. Eco-friendly boats

    Lasai 20 is an electric propulsion boat powered by solar photovoltaic energy with length variants between 5.99 and 6.80 meters and an attractive design (original in spanish). The Lasai 20 generates up to 1,500 Wp of power through photovoltaic solar energy (original in spanish).

  20. Navalt

    Experience Avalon, a revolutionary 15-passenger solar-electric semi-luxury cruise boat that redefines boating. Glide silently on emission-free solar power, relishing the perfect blend of sustainability and comfort. Step aboard Avalon for an unparalleled journey, where luxury meets responsible cruising, setting a new standard in boating excellence.

  21. home

    SolarCat solar-electric catamarans are manufactured in a small, rural town in Northern California by a family-owned business with over 30 years in the industry. We pride ourselves on a quality product and exceptional customer service. ... Solar-electric, motorized pontoon boat designed for a relaxing, innovative ride on the water. Learn More.

  22. Elvene

    Solar panels have come a long way in recent years, and modern solar electric boats are powered by high-quality, durable solar panels that can withstand harsh marine conditions and can be walked on. Investing in a solar electric boat is a way to stay on the cutting edge of boating technology while also doing your part to protect the environment.

  23. Solar Sal Electric Boat Cruises All Day On Nothing But Sunshine

    The key to the electric boat is the canopy above that provides space for 4 solar panels with a maximum capacity 350 watts each for a total of 1,400 watts. That's enough to cruise all day at ...

  24. SRAV: The World's First Solar-Electric Fishing Boat

    Efficiency Redefined. Our flagship SRAV solar-electric catamaran is meticulously designed to significantly reduce operational costs, thereby boosting fishermen's earnings. Powered by the MAKO 12 kW electric motor, the SRAV effortlessly glides through the sea at an impressive speed of 7 knots—setting a new benchmark in its class.