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Van de Stadt Caribbian 40

Discussion in ' Boat Design ' started by edik , Mar 9, 2013 .

edik

edik Junior Member

Has anybody had any experience with a sailboat designed by Van de Stadt, Caribbian 40, perhaps even built one? This boat seems like a bigger sister of a very popular design by the same designer, Van de Stad 34. The 34's have been built all over the world. A tripple hard chine, 1.1 m draft with CB, Caribbian 40 seems like a good candidate for amateur builder.  

Ilan Voyager

Ilan Voyager Senior Member

I do not know this Caribbean 40, but I've sailed long time ago on various boats designed by Van de Stadt. The Van de Stadt designs have excellent reputation in Europe (the quality of the plans is astounding also). It's Dutch...and the price of plans excellent as I've seen on the Internet site.. The style of the Caribbean gives a date of about 1970-1980 if I'm not mistaken. It's a classic rather light displacement if made in wood or aluminum.  

michael pierzga

michael pierzga Senior Member

Id prefer something more modern. You might look at the work of the French shipyard Alubat. http://www.alubat.com/les-gammes/gamme-cigale/cigale-16-new/  
Yes Michael, it's modern, but Alubat only builds boats. The Ovni 365 by Alubat would be in the sizes than the Caribbean. It seems that Edik is looking for plans for an amateur builder... Marc Lombard has no plans for amateurs, or it will be at the unity. He can see also on the side of European NA, there are plenty of plans, but I say again that the quality of the Van de Stadt plans is astounding, that helps a lot the poor builder embarked in a 5 years hard job. Such a boat in amateur building will cost more than 250K USD. The Caribbean 40 has a misleading name; his lines are in the Nordic tradition of cruising sail boats, like those by Wauquiez in France and Nautor in Findland, with protected cockpits. The Van de Stadt are sweet boats, but with a rather good mean speed. The wood version of the Caribbean 40 weights 7.3 tons for 98 m2, it's rather light for a cruising boat (the steel version is too heavy). In fact there are so many used sail boats to sell in Europe (there are Caribbeans 40 in alu at 150K USD including sales taxes...) that I would make the trip to UK, Holland and France to search one, rather than build it. Even if a some paperwork will be needed for importing it in the USA.  
michael pierzga said: ↑ Id prefer something more modern. You might look at the work of the French shipyard Alubat. http://www.alubat.com/les-gammes/gamme-cigale/cigale-16-new/ Click to expand...
edik said: ↑ Alubats are way out of reach. But building a boat in your own backyard means that in the worst case scenario, you will only suffer a set back equal to the cost of ALuminum sheets. Carribean 40 surely is a prety boat albeit almost too modern - I was considering something a little more traditional. VdS designs boats that exude confidence. And I like the fact that the CB is housed in the shallow keel and doesn't interfare with the interior. Click to expand...
Once you get a set of plans in hand, calculate a realistic budget to build that design. Contact a trusted Yacht broker....show him your boat plans and your cash pile, then ask him to search for a brokerage boat that fits your needs. This is the only way to prove "build new"..or buy used. As was mentioned the used boat market is a very good place for buyers right now. Because I work in a shipyard I frequently see pedigree boats available for quick sale because of divorce, bankruptcy, death........... A well connected broker will be aware of these boats. Not long ago, .a Swan 36 whose owner had died, was sold for 80k euros. A very nice boat. Last ear A Beneteau Figaro2 sponsorship program collapsed, it was seized by the bank, burnt in the sun, banged into the dock and ran up dockage bills for a year, then was sold for 50k. A fantastic bargain. Before you build, find out the price of what you want.  

Landlubber

Landlubber Senior Member

Before you build, find out the price of what you want.....................VERY good advice, most people have NO idea of the real costs of building a new boat.......the used boat market does have special deals every so often, if you can wait a year then chances are you will be able to get one somewhere, certainly lots below a new build, but if I had the money, it would be a new build, then look after her.  
Michael you gave an excellent advice and Landlubber you're right...often people have no idea of the cost of building a boat. Myself if I wanted a boat, I wouldn't build one even if I'm a former naval carpenter and a retired naval engineer. In fact it's because I know too well the number of hours involved in building a boat that I would prefer to buy a used one. For example there are plenty of Caribbean 40 to sell in UK and Holland. The nicest in aluminum with radar, plenty of electronics, big winches and looking pretty good on the pics is at 100 K pounds (166K USD VAT included, less than 142K USD without VAT as for export to the States you can deduce the VAT, and you'll pay the sales taxes in California) is less than 2/3 of the cost of building it with the bonus of the saved work. You can estimate for a beginner boatbuilder something between 2000 (very crude finition) to 5000 hours ...Something to meditate. If you take that you work about 2300 hours a year and you have a well paying job, it's not worth to build yourself. If you have a low income, a 40 feet won't be affordable even for its raw materials. And The hull is only 25% of the total cost of such a boat... Building your own very specific boat boat is a nice adventure when you have the means and time, otherwise it can become a nightmare. It remains that the Caribbean 40 is a pretty boat, and at 2050 Euros the plans with the mylar templates is a bargain...Tha Van de Stadt plans are always very complete, detailed and precise.  

Submarine Tom

Submarine Tom Previous Member

Ilan, Well said. Everyone should build at least one boat but that may be enough...  

erik818

erik818 Senior Member

Sometimes the journey is as important the goal. Only edik knows if building the boat has a value to itself. Erik  
Yes the journey may have value by itself, you may be able to take all the hardship, you may have the mental strength...but the journey must be carefully prepared. A stupid failure has no interest. You won't cross the Greenland even in summer in shorts and t shirt. I'm 60 and worked in boats for 43 years. I saw the birth of the home builders trend (before they were just some isolated guys). Some very beautiful successes, many failures and I have seen a lot of hulls abandoned. The analysis of the successes and failures gives the following clues; - Money. Without it no boat, specially when you go over 30 feet. The price of boats using similar technology level can be roughly calculated by weight. A heavy boat is more expensive than a light one, just arithmetics, even if some materials look cheaper at first sight than others.That means also good incomes, with savings. - Time. A good income means possible free time for the boat. Unhappily there are many people obliged to have 2, even 3 jobs for trying to meet ends. An exhausted guy without money can't build a boat. - Family and friends support. Without that, you'll end alone with an unfinished boat. - Manual ability and using (and mastering) the techniques used for building the boat. Many times we have questions in the forum about very basic techniques of boatbuilding that show that the person has not read the most basic books. Of these clues you can derive some consequences: * The size must be adapted to your budget and your time. * The chosen material must be within your technical possibilities and budget (cost of tooling for example). So after rationally considering all the factors, you can make a choice of size, model and material to build a boat with success. The most common mistakes are underestimating the cost and time, and taking a technique with a steep learning curve, and thus causing very costly mistakes. I have seen a few all home built aluminum boats just good for dumping because 80% of the welds wouldn't pass a very friendly visual inspection. I do not mention the wrinkles and the asymmetry of the poor things. Having leaking welds is annoying but a weld exploding in the middle of the ocean is truly very annoying. So choose a material you can master easily. The choice of the materials of the boat are strip plank (the easiest, the cheapest in tooling and in materials, the lightest. The most tedious maybe with hundreds of strips. Probably also the strongest), steel (relatively cheap by itself, but the insulation and lining are expensive. Also the protection and no-ending maintenance. The hardest, the noisiest and the dirtiest. Too heavy), aluminum (not cheap, expensive tooling, expensive insulation and lining, easy to cut, very technical to weld, electrolytic corrosion to survey). In my biased opinion for a home builder without technical background (the ordinary guy) strip wood is the easiest to master, needing only ordinary tools. Other advantage the job can be planned easily along the week, even when working for a living. The Gougeon Brothers on boat construction is now free: http://www.westsystem.com/ss/assets/HowTo-Publications/GougeonBook 061205.pdf Read it attentively, it's extremely instructive whatever the material and boat you'll choose. Good luck and cheers.  

pdwiley

pdwiley Senior Member

Ilan Voyager said: ↑ So choose a material you can master easily. The choice of the materials of the boat are strip plank (the easiest, the cheapest in tooling and in materials, the lightest. The most tedious maybe with hundreds of strips. Probably also the strongest), steel (relatively cheap by itself, but the insulation and lining are expensive. Also the protection and no-ending maintenance. The hardest, the noisiest and the dirtiest. Too heavy), aluminum (not cheap, expensive tooling, expensive insulation and lining, easy to cut, very technical to weld, electrolytic corrosion to survey). Click to expand...
The steel is the most resistant to accidents (high local stresses) like grounding as this material is ductile and won't be punctured easily. But it's not the strongest per pound for making a boat; its high density penalizes it so you have to work with relatively thin plates on a lot of framing structure. Even sometimes you may have the "horse ribs" mainly on the bow zone where the pounding by the water distorts the too thin plates between the framing. Also it has very little resilience, so it can be deformed locally with relatively low effort. While making a hull, when you want strength and rigidity with low weight per square meter, structural calculus shows that a thick light material with variable modulus from the center to the skins of a composite achieves the better ratio weight/strength/rigidity. That's the purpose of sandwiches and the most affordable and easier to make is wood/epoxy/glass fiber, giving excellent and very durable results with fairly low maintenance. I precise for dissipating any semantic doubt that the meaning of strong or general strength in this case is the acceptation of the expected loads by the material without permanent deformation at the minimal weight. Besides you get a monocoque structure, with no cluttered interior by the ribs and other framing. That helps highly the finish which can be inside a cheap automotive acrylic paint. It does not corrode nor has electrolytic issues thus does not need an expensive protection, it needs just a protection from the UV. Also it's insulating, thus generally you save all the work of insulation and suppress the problems of internal condensation that may plague metallic hulls. I agree that for navigation in cold to very cold waters a good insulation is imperative whatever the material. But generally if you plan to sail in the Arctic or Antarctic a steel or thick aluminum are better suited because of the resistance to puncture (not the same thing as general strength of the structure). That makes a lot of savings in materials and work which are fairly superior to the apparently slower construction of the bare hull itself. I have built boats in a lot of materials from classic wood to high tech carbon composites, and I have remarked that plywood and strip plank were the two materials most suited to the average home builder, and were also the most successful. The other possibility for a home builder is to have the metallic hull built and pre-finished (anti corrosion primaries after sandblasting on steel) by a pro shipyard, the home builder taking care of the (very long) remaining work. In aluminum the calculations of cost/amount of work/final value show that it is the best solution. Also you can have a preferential love and feeling for a material and that's beyond any discussion, it's personal matter. The most important is to happy and able with the material you're working with. PS a 40 feet (12m) hull in steel weights more than 3 times the weight of a 8 meters hull. You're probably building with 2.5 to 3 mm plates, the ordinary thickness for steel in this size of boat, a 12m asks for 3 (deck) , 4mm (topsides) and sometimes 5 mm around the bottom. Not the same weight. A 8 meters asks for an amount of work hours of about 1/3 of the amount needed for a 12 meters (very rough estimation).  
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If you like the Van de stadt plans buy them !! Once you have the plans in yours hands, do a very careful cost estimate for build workshop, tooling, materials and marine equipment... all the way thru to the finished boat. This number is important... no cheating...no wishful thinking, no inferior materials, only marine quality.....you must know the cost and have these funds. As was stated, having a pro shipyard build a hull would be my preferred custom boat routine. Metal..Aluminium ...is a nice material for a custom one off hull. Not steel..its to heavy. You would be very wise if you explored this route. For used boats the best value are production plastic 40 footers, many times ex charter boats. Search is places like Greece. Greece is were old boats go to die. An older Bavaria charter boat without a mast is a very cheap boat to buy . Im sure you have the same boat graveyards in the US. Find them and see what your money can buy.  

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Van de stadt review.

In the 1930’s, Ricus Van de Stadt bought a yard and opened a design studio in the Netherlands. A door manufacturer Bruynzeel fabricated a superior form of plywood called hechthout . The plywood was particularly suited for making sailboats. In 1939, Ricus designed the Valk and using the hechthout plywood built her in his yard. She was an instant and enduring success. In the Netherlands today, the Valk is still the most popular open sailboat design. Some of the original production 70 years later are still sailing. Van de Stadt ever an innovator continued seeking the next big improvements in design and contruction. He modified the Valk into the Zeevalk with a spade rudder and fin keel.

In 1955, Van de Stadt started experimenting with fiberglass. He designed and built a 30′ fiberglass sailboat called the Pionier . He embraced fiberglass contruction. In 1960, he introduced the first Maxi ocean racer, the 70′ Storm Vogel .

In 1973, Van de Stadt sold the yard but kept the design studio. In 1978, Ricus retired leaving the design studio to associates. In 1999, Ricus passed away at 89 years old. Today, Van de Stadt is a famous custom design studio. They have an excellent reputation for fast, modern designs of luxury sailboats, Maxi ocean racers of aluminum or fiberglass contruction.

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Van De Stadt.

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Anybody know anything about this make?a lot of 37/38 ft for sale in Europe in the 1990s ..built, costing 60 to 85k look very good .  

van de stadt yachts review

Is a well known Dutch yacht designer that has a good to excellent reputation. The attached link is the design house which still sell his plans / designs. VAN DE STADT DESIGN - Yacht Designers, Naval Architects Ilenart  

Thanks Built At Westerbrook Holland Thanks i found the info the boat,it is steel built at westerbrook ship yard in holland.You are right some van de stadts were home built i think one built at a Dutch shipyard should be ok they have a great reputation for quality craft.  

van de stadt yachts review

Provided they are professionally built or built to a professional standard most Van de Stadts are great boats. We have a 34' steel, built late 80's and have never had any cause to regret the purchase. While a 34' steeler is never going to be the fastest thing on the water she still sails quite well enough though she needs a bit of wind to get going. Reality is that's a feature of most small(ish) steel boats. We didn't set out to buy a steel boat, indeed we bought her despite that fact. It's true some Stadt's have odd interior arrangements but in the main they are comfortable boats for long term cruising or liveaboard. While we'd like to go a bit bigger in the long term, I'd happily sail our old girl anywhere. If you like, let me know which designs you are looking at and if I am able I'll comment on the specific designs. Cheers (and welcome to the forum) ps - Van de Stads have been built as production boats, e.g The early model Dehler 34 was a Van de Stadt but most are built from plans. There are also a number of them in cold moulded, aluminium and plywood (older boats). Evans Starzinger & Beth Leonard ( Beth & Evans ) sail a particularly lovely example of a VdS and if you can find a copy there is an article by an Australian couple cruising an older model VdS in the current issue of the Australian mag, Cruising Helmsman.  

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van de stadt yachts review

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Excalibur 36

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In her day, the Excalibur was regarded as a large ocean cruiser and offshore racer. Designed by E G van de Stadt in 1964, 52 were built by Southern Ocean Shipyards in Poole on Tyler mouldings, with a sturdy masthead rig stepped on the coachroof. She is long, slim, weatherly and sea-kindly with a comfortable motion in a seaway and has a number of serious ocean passages to her credit, as well as being highly successful in RORC Class II. She was built to the exacting Lloyds +100A1 standard and, like most Tyler hulls, has lasted well and there’s a low risk of osmosis. She has traditionally designed accommodation for six. The layout works well at sea, though with just 10ft (3m) beam, space is restricted. She is a good option as a first offshore cruiser and prices are reasonable.

LoA 10.97m (36ft) LWL 8.01m (26ft 3in) beam 3.01m (10ft) Draught 1.82m (5ft 11in) Displacement 6,567kg (14,448lb) YM report December 1994

Review of Jupiter 30 (S)

Basic specs..

The boat is typically equipped with an inboard diesel engine at 11.0 hp (8 kW).

The transmission is a shaft drive. A shaft drive will in the long run require less maintenence than other types of drive e.g. a sail drive.

Sailing characteristics

This section covers widely used rules of thumb to describe the sailing characteristics. Please note that even though the calculations are correct, the interpretation of the results might not be valid for extreme boats.

What is Capsize Screening Formula (CSF)?

The capsize screening value for Jupiter 30 (S) is 2.23, indicating that this boat would not be accepted to participate in ocean races.

The immersion rate is defined as the weight required to sink the boat a certain level. The immersion rate for Jupiter 30 (S) is about 193 kg/cm, alternatively 1086 lbs/inch. Meaning: if you load 193 kg cargo on the boat then it will sink 1 cm. Alternatively, if you load 1086 lbs cargo on the boat it will sink 1 inch.

Sailing statistics

This section is statistical comparison with similar boats of the same category. The basis of the following statistical computations is our unique database with more than 26,000 different boat types and 350,000 data points.

What is L/B (Length Beam Ratio)?

SA/D (Sail Area Displacement ratio) Indicates how fast the boat is in light wind: - Cruising Boats have ratios 10-15 - Cruiser-Racers have ratios 16-20 - Racers have ratios above 20 - High-Performance Racers have ratios above 24 Sail-area/displacement ratio (SA/D ratio): 23.91

Maintenance

If you need to renew parts of your running rig and is not quite sure of the dimensions, you may find the estimates computed below useful.

This section is reserved boat owner's modifications, improvements, etc. Here you might find (or contribute with) inspiration for your boat.

Do you have changes/improvements you would like to share? Upload a photo and describe what you have done.

We are always looking for new photos. If you can contribute with photos for Jupiter 30 (S) it would be a great help.

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Invicta 26 is a 26 ′ 4 ″ / 8.1 m monohull sailboat designed by E. G. Van de Stadt and built by Tyler Boat Co. Ltd. starting in 1964.

Drawing of Invicta 26

Rig and Sails

Auxilary power, accomodations, calculations.

The theoretical maximum speed that a displacement hull can move efficiently through the water is determined by it's waterline length and displacement. It may be unable to reach this speed if the boat is underpowered or heavily loaded, though it may exceed this speed given enough power. Read more.

Classic hull speed formula:

Hull Speed = 1.34 x √LWL

Max Speed/Length ratio = 8.26 ÷ Displacement/Length ratio .311 Hull Speed = Max Speed/Length ratio x √LWL

Sail Area / Displacement Ratio

A measure of the power of the sails relative to the weight of the boat. The higher the number, the higher the performance, but the harder the boat will be to handle. This ratio is a "non-dimensional" value that facilitates comparisons between boats of different types and sizes. Read more.

SA/D = SA ÷ (D ÷ 64) 2/3

  • SA : Sail area in square feet, derived by adding the mainsail area to 100% of the foretriangle area (the lateral area above the deck between the mast and the forestay).
  • D : Displacement in pounds.

Ballast / Displacement Ratio

A measure of the stability of a boat's hull that suggests how well a monohull will stand up to its sails. The ballast displacement ratio indicates how much of the weight of a boat is placed for maximum stability against capsizing and is an indicator of stiffness and resistance to capsize.

Ballast / Displacement * 100

Displacement / Length Ratio

A measure of the weight of the boat relative to it's length at the waterline. The higher a boat’s D/L ratio, the more easily it will carry a load and the more comfortable its motion will be. The lower a boat's ratio is, the less power it takes to drive the boat to its nominal hull speed or beyond. Read more.

D/L = (D ÷ 2240) ÷ (0.01 x LWL)³

  • D: Displacement of the boat in pounds.
  • LWL: Waterline length in feet

Comfort Ratio

This ratio assess how quickly and abruptly a boat’s hull reacts to waves in a significant seaway, these being the elements of a boat’s motion most likely to cause seasickness. Read more.

Comfort ratio = D ÷ (.65 x (.7 LWL + .3 LOA) x Beam 1.33 )

  • D: Displacement of the boat in pounds
  • LOA: Length overall in feet
  • Beam: Width of boat at the widest point in feet

Capsize Screening Formula

This formula attempts to indicate whether a given boat might be too wide and light to readily right itself after being overturned in extreme conditions. Read more.

CSV = Beam ÷ ³√(D / 64)

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COMMENTS

  1. E. G. Van de Stadt

    Ericus Gerhardus van de Stadt (1910-1999) was one of the pioneers of modern yacht design. (Extract from the book: "E.G. van de Stadt YACHT DESIGN PIONEER") In 1933, he and his wife Lies started a boatyard at Zaandam, where they lived aboard a houseboat, designing and building canoes and dinghies. They developed a successful business despite the set back of World War II, and not overcoming ...

  2. USED BOAT: Van de Stadt, Legend 34

    USED BOAT: Van de Stadt, Legend 34. Manufacturer: Legend. Price as reviewed: £17,500.00. TAGS: Legend used boat test Yacht review. The owner. Quetzal was launched in 1972 and bought by Guy Dickinson in 2006. Prior to then Guy owned a Hunter Sonata and a variety of small plywood cruisers and dinghies.

  3. E. G. Van de Stadt

    1963 • 11 m. Sailboat. Breeon 36. 1961 • 11 m. Ericus Gerhardus van de Stadt (1910-1999) was one of the pioneers of modern yacht design. (Extract from the book: "E.G. van de Stadt YACHT DESIGN PIONEER") In 1933, he and his wife Lies started a boatyard at Zaandam, where they lived aboard a houseboat, designing and building canoes and ...

  4. Van de Stadt 34: what is your opinion

    Hi lluca, both boats look great, I have no experience of the Reinke but should be spacious with the raised deck profile & house arrangement. The Van de Stadt is a lovely boat, my first larger boat build was a steel VDS 34 around 30 years ago for my own use at 20 years old. Fabrication was quite quick with some supervision from Dad, I sold her ...

  5. Van de Stadt thoughts?

    Vand de Stadt was one of the great designers of that era and his designs were solid bluewater boats.However Vand de Stadt is not a brand but a designer and his boats were made by many shipyards and home built too. That one is not home built and that is a good sign but it was made by a South African Shipyard: Halstead Marine So I would say that the information you need is not about the boat ...

  6. Van de Stadt Pionier 9

    Pionier. 1 post · Joined 2008. #2 · May 11, 2008. "Tough as Nails". Hello, We have been sailing on an E.G. van de Stadt Pioneer 9 meter (1961) on Lake Superior since 1971. It has been in the family since then. It is extremely well built and can handle any weather with ease. It goes to weather extremely well.

  7. Van de Stadt Design

    Turkey. Pointer 25. true sailing pleasure. Van de Stadt Design Yacht Designers and Naval Architects with 70 Years Experience in Custom Build, Serial Production or Do It Yourself (DIY)

  8. VAN DE STADT 34

    Stock plans available from www.stadtdesign.com. Hull material: steel, aluminum or wood. Also available with Masthead rig. SA = 61.7 sqm. Also available with keel/centerboard. Draft: 0.97m - 1.7m. For wood hulls: Keel/centerboard draft: 1.07m - 1.77m. A doghouse version is also Available.

  9. Jupiter 30

    Jupiter 30 is a 29′ 3″ / 8.9 m monohull sailboat designed by E. G. Van de Stadt and built by Jupiter Yachts starting in 1982. Great choice! Your favorites are temporarily saved for this session. Sign in to save them permanently, access them on any device, and receive relevant alerts. ... The lower a boat's ratio is, the less power it takes ...

  10. Excalibur 36

    Excalibur 36 is a 11 m monohull sailboat designed by E. G. Van de Stadt and built by Tyler Boat Co. Ltd. and Southern Ocean Shipyard Ltd. starting in 1963. Designer. E. G. Van de Stadt.

  11. Van de Stadt Design

    Seal 36 | № 260. SEAL is a true flush-deck yacht. The hull is brought up to a height that gives standing room below deck without a long coach-roof. The compact form and the large area both on and below deck appeals to many sailors. The high freeboard ensures that less water comes on deck. The roomy interior offers a completely separate aft ...

  12. Van de Stadt Caribbian 40

    The Caribbean 40 has a misleading name; his lines are in the Nordic tradition of cruising sail boats, like those by Wauquiez in France and Nautor in Findland, with protected cockpits. The Van de Stadt are sweet boats, but with a rather good mean speed. The wood version of the Caribbean 40 weights 7.3 tons for 98 m2, it's rather light for a ...

  13. Van De Stadt boats for sale

    Van De Stadt boats for sale on YachtWorld are offered at an assortment of prices from $10,796 on the lower-cost segment, with costs up to $1,302,047 for the most expensive, custom yachts. What Van De Stadt model is the best? Some of the most widely-known Van De Stadt models now listed include: Helena 38, 29, 36 Excalibur, 44 Center Cockpit and ...

  14. Van de Stadt Design

    The VAN DE STADT 34 is a modern design with plenty of space below deck. A comfortable double bed is projected in the stern. The toilet has enough room for a shower. The galley offers good moving space, the saloon looks like that of a 40 footer. And, at the chart table you can really work. This sea-going yacht makes crossings shorter.

  15. Van de Stadt Review

    Van de Stadt Review. In the 1930's, Ricus Van de Stadt bought a yard and opened a design studio in the Netherlands. A door manufacturer Bruynzeel fabricated a superior form of plywood called hechthout. The plywood was particularly suited for making sailboats. In 1939, Ricus designed the Valk and using the hechthout plywood built her in his yard.

  16. Review of Van de Stadt 34

    The immersion rate is defined as the weight required to sink the boat a certain level. The immersion rate for Van de Stadt 34 is about 226 kg/cm, alternatively 1269 lbs/inch. Meaning: if you load 226 kg cargo on the boat then it will sink 1 cm. Alternatively, if you load 1269 lbs cargo on the boat it will sink 1 inch.

  17. Van De Stadt.

    ps - Van de Stads have been built as production boats, e.g The early model Dehler 34 was a Van de Stadt but most are built from plans. There are also a number of them in cold moulded, aluminium and plywood (older boats). Evans Starzinger & Beth Leonard ( Beth & Evans) sail a particularly lovely example of a VdS and if you can find a copy there ...

  18. Harmony 31

    Harmony 31 is a 31′ 2″ / 9.5 m monohull sailboat designed by E. G. Van de Stadt and built by Tyler Boat Co. Ltd., Malö Yachts, and Southern Ocean Shipyard Ltd. between 1964 and 1968.

  19. Excalibur 36

    Yachting Monthly. August 5, 2009. 0 shares. Excalibur 36. In her day, the Excalibur was regarded as a large ocean cruiser and offshore. racer. Designed by E G van de Stadt in 1964, 52 were built by Southern. Ocean Shipyards in Poole on Tyler mouldings, with a sturdy masthead rig. stepped on the coachroof.

  20. Review of Jupiter 30 (S)

    Review of Jupiter 30 (S) Basic specs. The Jupiter 30 (S) aka Jupiter 1/2 Ton is a sailboat designed by the Dutch maritime architect E. G. van de Stadt. The Jupiter 30 (S) is built by Jupiter Yachts. Here we would have liked to show you nice photos of the Jupiter 30 (S). ... if you load 193 kg cargo on the boat then it will sink 1 cm ...

  21. SPIRIT 24 (VAN DE STADT)

    Van Heygen (BEL) Designer: E. G. van de Stadt: KLSC Leaderboard. Sailboat Calculations Definitions S.A. / Displ.: 21.86: Bal. / Displ.: 42.19 ... Like the LWL, it will vary with the weights of fuel, water, stores and equipment. A boat's actual draft is usually somewhat more than the original designed or advertised draft. For boats with ...

  22. Invicta 26

    Invicta 26 is a 26′ 4″ / 8.1 m monohull sailboat designed by E. G. Van de Stadt and built by Tyler Boat Co. Ltd. starting in 1964.

  23. SPIRIT 28 (VAN DE STADT)

    Shallow draft keel available. Draft: 1.42m / 4.66ft; Ballast: 1055kg / 2325.9 lbs. VDS design #216. The designer himself owned a SPRIT 28 for a number of years. Also built in Australia and probably a number of other places. Number built above is from A.J. Van Heygen only.