Characters - Eduqas The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come

Three ghosts take Scrooge through Christmases past, present and future. Characters Bob Cratchit, his son Tiny Tim, and Scrooge’s nephew Fred, all influence Scrooge in his journey of transformation.

The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come in A Christmas Carol

The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come

The final Ghost is frightening and eerie. It doesn't say a word to Scrooge, but glides along and points out scenes to him.

The spirit first shows Scrooge a funeral scene, with businessmen wondering about the money that the dead man has left. The Ghost then takes him through dark alleyways to a scene of three people picking through the belongings of the deceased. Scrooge recognises that his own death could be met this way.

Next the Ghost takes him to the Cratchit household where Scrooge is upset to realise that Tiny Tim has died.

Finally the Ghost shows him a tombstone engraved with the name: Ebenezer Scrooge. Clutching at the spirit's robes, Scrooge pledges to change his ways if he can avoid this solitary death. The Ghost disappears and leaves Scrooge clutching at his bed curtains.

Learn more about the three ghosts in this podcast

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A Christmas Carol

By charles dickens, a christmas carol summary and analysis of stave four.

The Ghost of Christmas Yet To Come solemnly approaches Scrooge in its black garment. It responds to Scrooge's questions with silence and motions for him to follow. They instantly appear in the city and listen in on some businessmen who casually and jokingly discuss someone's death. Scrooge wonders why the Ghost is showing him these conversations and what bearing they have on his future self. However, he does not see himself among the crowds.

Scrooge and the Ghost travel through a poor, run-down part of town. In a shop, several people divvy up some possessions they have plundered from a man who has recently died. Scrooge tells the Ghost that he sees his life might turn out like the dead man's. The scene changes and Scrooge is at the plundered bed of the corpse. Scrooge cannot bring himself to raise the veil of the dead man and see his face. Scrooge asks the Ghost to show him someone who has been emotionally affected by the man's death.

They are transported to the house of a young couple, who rejoices since their merciless creditor has died and they are not ruined from debt. Scrooge asks the host to show him some tenderness connected with a death. In the Cratchit home, Bob mourns for Tiny Tim , who has recently died. He tells the family about the kindness of Scrooge's nephew, Fred , and soon feels better when he discusses Tiny Tim's lasting memory.

Scrooge asks the Ghost who the dead man they saw was, but the Ghost only brings him to Scrooge's office. However, someone new has taken over the office. The Ghost points Scrooge toward a graveyard and to a specific grave. Before Scrooge looks at it, he asks the Ghost if these are the shadows of things that "Will" be or "May" be. Scrooge believes they are the shadows of what "May" be, but the Ghost says nothing. Scrooge sees his own name on the tombstone, and realizes he was the dead man from before. Scrooge vows to honor Christmas in his heart and live by the lessons of the past, present, and future, such that he may alter his life. The Ghost shrinks and collapses into a bedpost.

Dickens continues his development of the theme of free will over determinism. Scrooge understands that the future he is shown is alterable and that he can change his fate. Again, this idea celebrates the potential for redemption in anyone and urges people to change their ill ways right now as opposed to later.

Dickens also focuses on the ways a person has influence beyond his or her lifetime. What cheers up Bob after Tiny Tim's death is that his son's memory will live on and remind them of the good in the world. Conversely, the only joy Scrooge's life will provide for others after it is over is through their acquisition of his material goods or release from debt, not through his memory.

Scrooge finally has the redemptive epiphany he has been gradually learning throughout his travels in the past, present, and future. However, an epiphany, by definition, is a sudden revelation. How can we call Scrooge's adventure, which supposedly stretches over three days, an epiphany? As we will see in Stave Five, all of the ghostly visits took place over just one night. Just as Scrooge learns to assimilate the past, present, and future into his life, the three different temporal ghosts have come to Scrooge in one time frame, perhaps even all at once. For Dickens, then, the epiphany is a sudden revelation that encompasses all time.

The two other definitions of epiphany have associations with A Christmas Carol . Epiphany, on January 6, is the festival commemorating the coming of the Magi as the first manifestation of Christ to the Gentiles. Epiphany also means an appearance or manifestation especially of a divine being, and the ghosts certainly fit into this category.

In addition, the silent Ghost of Christmas Yet To Come looks much like the Grim Reaper and has similarly divine powers in his final judgment of human lives. Those who lead good lives like Tiny Tim will go to heaven and be commemorated on earth, while those who lead bad lives like Scrooge will go to hell and be scorned on earth.

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A Christmas Carol Questions and Answers

The Question and Answer section for A Christmas Carol is a great resource to ask questions, find answers, and discuss the novel.

What is the author's likely purpose for the figurative language used in paragraph 6? Cite at least two pieces of evidence from the paragraph in your response.

I can't be sure if your paragraph 6 matches mine. There are literally hundreds of publications of this story. If you quote the first line of the paragraph, I can find it.

Why does Scrooge hate Christmas so much?

Scrooge is alone and his hate on for Christmas is, at least in part, a defence mechanism. Scrooge became isolated as he accumulated his wealth: his rejection of friends and family for the sake of wealth becomes a theme in the story. Scrooge sees...

What kind of character designation would Scrooge be?

Ebenezer Scrooge would be your classic dynamic character.

Study Guide for A Christmas Carol

A Christmas Carol study guide contains a biography of Charles Dickens, literature essays, a complete e-text, quiz questions, major themes, characters, and a full summary and analysis.

  • About A Christmas Carol
  • A Christmas Carol Summary
  • A Christmas Carol Video
  • Character List

Essays for A Christmas Carol

A Christmas Carol literature essays are academic essays for citation. These papers were written primarily by students and provide critical analysis of A Christmas Carol.

  • Have a Capitalist Christmas: The Critique of Christmas Time in "A Christmas Carol"
  • Movement Within the Episodes
  • Ghost of an Idea
  • A Secular Christmas: Examining Religion in Dickens' A Christmas Carol
  • Perceiving the Need for Social Change in "A Christmas Carol"

Lesson Plan for A Christmas Carol

  • About the Author
  • Study Objectives
  • Common Core Standards
  • Introduction to A Christmas Carol
  • Relationship to Other Books
  • Bringing in Technology
  • Notes to the Teacher
  • Related Links
  • A Christmas Carol Bibliography

E-Text of A Christmas Carol

A Christmas Carol E-Text contains the full text of A Christmas Carol

  • Stave I: Marley's Ghost
  • Stave II: The First Of The Three Spirits
  • Stave III: The Second Of The Three Spirits
  • Stave IV: The Last Of The Spirits

Wikipedia Entries for A Christmas Carol

  • Introduction

analysis of ghost of christmas yet to come

analysis of ghost of christmas yet to come

A Christmas Carol

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The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come

The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come is gloomy, vague, silent figure. He looks like this because he has nothing pleasant to show Scrooge. Death, betrayal, the joy of people for his death— all this affects and heals the soul of the hero at the same time.

The most terrible test was made for Scrooge by a third ghost—the ghost of the future of Christmas. He leads Scrooge into someone else dwelling. Everything is so familiar there because it's his own apartment, his own bed, where someone insensible lies on it. Scrooge hears someone talking about the deceased, that is, about him—and people do not say anything good about Scrooge. He sees his grave at the cemetery. His name is written on the grave plate. Depraved from despair, a man grabs the ghostly arm and asks him for mercy. Scrooge continues to ask mercy, he tries to keep the Ghost, but he repels and disappears. Scrooge is awakening. He wants to change his life as fast as possible.

The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come shows the death of Ebenezer. Scrooge understands that after his death nobody will remember him with a good word, because during his life he was a bad person. When Tiny Tim also died, this became a real tragedy for the whole family. His relatives will remember him all his life, and after the death of the Scrooge, the maid will take his clothes—and nothing more.

Scrooge was alive physically, but dead morally, but after rethinking the values, he revived his once living soul and began to do good deeds, before he was alien to him. And the fact that this happens on the eve of Christmas and New Year is doubly symbolic since these holidays symbolize renewal and the birth of a new one.

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The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come in the Essays

Frank Frazier

Author: Frank Frazier

Sarah

Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come

Character analysis, the phaaantom of christmastime is here.

However eerie and unpleasant Scrooge's midnight adventures have been, they are all fun and games until the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come shows up. This thing isn't even called a ghost any more—Dickens changes the terminology and starts referring to this super menacing cloaked figure as a "phantom."

The text doesn't really explain this word change, but we're guessing it has something to do with the fact that the other two Christmas ghosts were a lot more human in their behavior than this mutely pointing dude. (Also, Dickens might just have a thing about silent figures pointing fingers at the guilty. Check out the death of lawyer Tulkinghorn in Bleak House . It happens right under a painting of a guy pointing down at the corpse .)

The phantom's exit is a little more predictable than that of the other two ghosts. Sure, it's stressful when the thing disappears without telling Scrooge whether he'll get a do-over, but, hey, at least it's not birthing claw-footed babies in front him. It's the little things. Here is how the good-bye goes down:

"Are these the shadows of the things that Will be, or are they shadows of things that May be, only? […] Why show me this, if I am past all hope! […] Assure me that I yet may change these shadows you have shown me, by an altered life!" […]

In his agony, [Scrooge] caught the spectral hand. It sought to free itself, but he was strong in his entreaty, and detained it. The Spirit, stronger yet, repulsed him.

Holding up his hands in a last prayer to have his fate reversed, he saw an alteration in the Phantom's hood and dress. It shrunk, collapsed, and dwindled down into a bedpost. (4.151-166)

Scrooge has gone from fighting the ghosts off to trying desperately to hold onto them and not go back to his own reality. That's a pretty startling change, no? Again, is this a sign that he really has undergone some fundamental shift in his ability to empathize with others?

It was a little more marked during his good-bye with the Ghost of Christmas Present, when instead of losing it at the sight of the ghost-babies, Scrooge is instead worried about whether the ghost is okay.

But here, there is a clear difference as well—Scrooge is making an appeal to the phantom's sense of mercy and asking it to just have some pity on him and tell him the deal. Rather than attacking it, like he did with the Ghost of Christmas Past, Scrooge tries to find the emotional humanity in a startlingly inhuman figure.

This seems like a pretty big departure, and a mirror of what has happened to Scrooge himself. He has rediscovered his own humanity under all that cold.

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IMAGES

  1. The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come in A Christmas Carol

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  2. The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come: Key Quotations and Analysis

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  3. The Ghost of Yet to Come

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  4. A CHRISTMAS CAROL Quotes GCSE REVISION Poster THE GHOST OF CHRISTMAS

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  5. 18. A Christmas Carol Analysis

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  6. The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come

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COMMENTS

  1. The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come Character Analysis in A Christmas

    It's no accident that the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come is described similarly to the Grim Reaper; the final lesson imparted to Scrooge harkens back to Jacob Marley's warning about an eternity of punishment and centers on one's fear of death, and the ghost personifies death's inevitability.

  2. Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come

    The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come is a fictional character in Charles Dickens 's 1843 novella A Christmas Carol. The Ghost is the last of the three spirits that appear to miser Ebenezer Scrooge to offer him a chance of redemption .

  3. Characters

    Eduqas Characters - Eduqas The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come Three ghosts take Scrooge through Christmases past, present and future. Characters Bob Cratchit, his son Tiny Tim, and...

  4. The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come Character Analysis

    The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come Character Analysis Next Bob Cratchit The most ominous of all the spirits, he is a robed, silent figure and Scrooge fears his message most of all.

  5. A Christmas Carol Stave Four: The Last of the Spirits Summary

    Summary Stave Four: The Last of the Spirits Summary The phantom, a menacing figure clad in a black hooded robe, approaches Scrooge. Scrooge involuntarily kneels before him and asks if he is the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come. The phantom does not answer, and Scrooge squirms in terror.

  6. A Christmas Carol Stave Four Summary and Analysis

    The Ghost of Christmas Yet To Come solemnly approaches Scrooge in its black garment. It responds to Scrooge's questions with silence and motions for him to follow. They instantly appear in the city and listen in on some businessmen who casually and jokingly discuss someone's death.

  7. A Christmas Carol Stave 4 Summary & Analysis

    Summary Analysis The last ghost approaches, but is shrouded in a black garment so that all Scrooge can see of it is an outstretched hand and a mass of black. This figure fills him with greater dread than the other ghosts. It does not speak to him and beckons mysteriously with its hand.

  8. Analyze the description of the Ghost of Christmas Yet To Come in A

    Share Cite. The ghost of Christmas Yet To Come is described as a "solemn phantom," creeping along the ground like a mist. This ghost is different from the others in its silence, which gives it an ...

  9. The Ghosts of Christmas The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come's role in

    The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come's role in the novella This is the most mysterious of the Ghosts, reflecting the fact that the future is uncertain and depends on our present actions. It shows Scrooge what will happen if he doesn't change his ways. In the novella it: doesn't speak to Scrooge, but just points with its hand.

  10. Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come in A Christmas Carol

    The Spirit, stronger yet, repulsed him. Holding up his hands in a last prayer to have his fate reversed, he saw an alteration in the Phantom's hood and dress. It shrunk, collapsed, and dwindled down into a bedpost. (4.151-166) Scrooge has gone from fighting the ghosts off to trying desperately to hold onto them and not go back to his own reality.

  11. The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come: Key Quotations and Analysis

    313 Share 12K views 3 years ago 'A Christmas Carol' GCSE English Literature Revision Welcome to the fifteenth video in my "'A Christmas Carol' GCSE English Literature Revision" series! In this...

  12. The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come Character Analysis

    Literature Study Guides The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come is gloomy, vague, silent figure. He looks like this because he has nothing pleasant to show Scrooge. Death, betrayal, the joy of people for his death— all this affects and heals the soul of the hero at the same time.

  13. Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come

    Character Analysis The Phaaantom of Christmastime Is Here. However eerie and unpleasant Scrooge's midnight adventures have been, they are all fun and games until the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come shows up. This thing isn't even called a ghost any more—Dickens changes the terminology and starts referring to this super menacing cloaked figure ...

  14. Ghost of Christmas Future in A Christmas Carol

    Learn about the Ghost of Christmas Future or Christmas Yet to Come in Charles Dickens' story ''A Christmas Carol''. See how this character is critical to the story. Updated: 11/21/2023

  15. Charles Dickens

    Charles Dickens Track 5 on A Christmas Carol Scrooge encounters the last of the Spirits: the ominous Ghost of Christmas Future or Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come. 1843 1 viewer 60.8K...

  16. Symbols in A Christmas Carol

    The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come: The final spirit, silent and clothed in black, symbolizes the uncertainty and fear of the future. The presence is mysterious and without identifiable features, showing that the future is not yet set. Scrooge's Gravestone: Shown to him by the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come, the gravestone symbolizes Scrooge ...

  17. Top Grade Analysis of Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come (Mr Salles)

    0:00 / 21:56 Top Grade Analysis of Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come (Mr Salles) Mr Salles Teaches English 129K subscribers Subscribe Subscribed 245 10K views 2 years ago

  18. the ghost of christmas yet to come quotes + analysis

    the ghost of christmas yet to come quotes + analysis. "shrouded in a deep black garment, which concealed its head, its face, its form". Click the card to flip 👆. -personified as death. -terrifying figure. -dickens uses a semantic field of blackness to contrast the previous two spirits that were a symbol of light.

  19. PDF The Ghosts

    Character Summary The Ghost of Christmas Past is the first of the three Spirits which appear to Scrooge. The Ghost takes him to observe various scenes from his past, which allows the reader to empathise with Scrooge. This is because Dickens often adopts

  20. A Christmas Carol: The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come Quotes

    The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come, like the future itself, appears as a mysterious and unknowable figure, literally shrouded in darkness. Here, the narrator describes the scene when the Ghost first appears to Scrooge. The Ghost takes Scrooge to future events and points to the details Scrooge needs to see, but does not answer any questions.

  21. The Ghost of Christmas Present Character Analysis in A Christmas Carol

    Scrooge doesn't recognize him at first—the ghost says, "You have never seen the like of me before!"—because he scorns the holiday and is unfamiliar with the very concept. However, he does regard the spirit with reverence, suggesting his heart is changing. The spirit only lives as long as the Christmas season, and is reborn again each ...