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How to Sail Around the World

How to Sail Around the World | Life of Sailing

Last Updated by

Daniel Wade

June 15, 2022

Sailing around the world can be the experience of a lifetime - an adventure that lets you know you are living life to its fullest and not settling for a life that is too dull and ordinary. However, getting on a boat and sailing around the world is not something you can do a week after you decide you want to do it. Is sailing around the world something that an ordinary person without a lot of money can do at all?

You might worry that sailing around the world is only for the rich. Getting your own boat costs a fortune, and you might fear that without your own boat, it is hard to find an opportunity to go on a long sailing voyage. However, it is easier to find a crew and sail around the world on someone else's boat than you would think.

One of the best ways to sail around the world without having a lot of money is to volunteer on a sailboat. The work that you do on the boat may be enough that the crew will take you for free. Volunteering to work on a sailboat might be the single best way to sail around the world without a lot of money.

Other options are paying money to be part of a crew by sharing costs, finding friends that have sailboats, volunteering on a research boat, or paying a boat off over time if you have the income. People with the right skills, even if they are only cooking or knowing how to be a good deckhand, will find it easier to become part of a crew.

Table of contents

How to sail around the world without a boat

If you really want to sail around the world, you can find a way to do it. A sailing trip around the world is a realistic, achievable adventure. You merely have to be serious about doing it.

It is not the same as a trip to space - that you might not be able to achieve even if you are determined to do it. Sailing around the world is something an average person can do if they plan it out and look for an opportunity.

Volunteering to be on a boat

If you have a lot of sailing experience, it might not be difficult for you to find a crew to sail around the world with. Your nearest marina could very well be looking for deckhands. Not every boat will be heading off on an around the world trip, but some of them might be.

Many boats sailing around the world need an extra crew member and will be happy to take you if you have a bit of sailing experience. People underestimate just how much demand there is for volunteer crew members.

When a couple of wealthy people want to sail around the world, they don't necessarily want to do it themselves. Keeping a sailboat going with very few people on board is hard work. If there are only two sailors, they will have to take turns sleeping to keep the boat going safely.

A third or fourth crew member can mean the difference between a pleasant voyage and an exhausting one. Not everyone who sails around the world has a mega yacht and a large crew. They might have a smaller boat and only need a third person.

The best part of volunteering on a boat is that most of the time, it isn't even hard work. Sometimes you will steer the ship; other times, you will do some chores. It is not difficult to do this.

The fun you will have massively outweighs the work you will do. You will get to explore islands, see many different countries, meet new people, and end your voyage with stories to tell. Don't worry about doing unpaid work - it is more than worth it.

Paid work on a sailboat is also possible to get, but you must have quite a bit of sailing experience. Volunteering is a more realistic way of traveling around the world than looking for paid work on a boat.

Sailing around the world on a friend's boat

One disadvantage of sailing around the world as a volunteer is the possibility of not getting along with the people you travel with. While you might like the people you volunteer for very much, there is a chance that you will not. If you have the opportunity, traveling around the world on a friend's boat should be your first choice.

If you go off on shorter sailing voyages, you will meet people that have the resources to sail. Hopefully, you should know the right people when someone decides they want to sail around the world. They might be happy to take you along for free.

Being out at sea with someone you do not end up liking is sometimes a problem even if you know the person a little bit in advance. Even if you like each other now, you might not like each other when you are out to sea together for weeks, months, and years. Don't let this scare you away from going on a long sea voyage, but be confident that you can get along with the person before you head out to sea for years.

Save enough money and get a boat with your friends

While a sailboat that you can take around the world costs around $75000, this is not such a fortune if you split the cost between several people. If you and five of your friends want to sail around the world, it will only cost you $15000 each to get a seaworthy boat. $15000 isn't exactly pocket change, but you might be able to save that in a reasonable amount of time if you cut your costs.

If you had started saving a few years ago, you and your friends would have enough money to pay for the entire trip now. The best time to start saving was years ago; the next best time to start saving is today. If you have friends that have the same dream of sailing around the world, you might be able to talk them into making a serious plan to do it.

Sail around the world on a research ship

You don't have to be a scientist to serve on a research ship that studies marine wildlife. Such vessels also need deckhands, cooks, and so on. You will probably have to volunteer rather than find a paying job, but you will still be able to sail to many locations, perhaps even around the world, for free.

Offer your skills as a cook

Cooking is one of the best skills you can have if you are looking for a crew to sail around the world with. If you are an excellent cook with a bit of sailing experience, you have a good chance of becoming part of a crew. You need to be able to improvise and cook something tasty from the food you have available.

You do not always have to be a certified chef to cook on a sailing ship, merely being a good cook is enough. Only a larger ship might require their cook to be a certified chef, and even then, that is not always the case.

Teach the children of families sailing around the world

If a family is sailing around the world with children with them, they might not have time to homeschool the children. Such families will bring a teacher with them. This is less likely than some of the other options, but if you would be good at being a nanny and teacher on a sailboat, you might be able to find the opportunity.

Pay to be part of a crew

A crew might be happy to take you if you can pay for your share of the cost of the voyage. This may be expensive, but it is much more affordable than getting your own boat.

The daily cost of a trip for a single person might be $20, $50, or $70. Don't get ripped off by people trying to charge a lot more than that. They should not be charging you a very high daily cost, and are trying to make a profit from you if they do.

Paying to be part of a crew is a good idea if you are offered a fair price. It can add up to a lot of money if you are out to sea for a long time, but it is cheaper than buying a boat yourself.

Can you sail around the world on a rented sailboat?

Possibly not. A rented sailboat may have restrictions on where you can sail it, and you might not be able to rent it for long enough to circumnavigate the globe.

Then again, some people might have more luck than others. Give it a chance - try to find a sailboat you can rent for a long time and sail anywhere at a reasonable price - but this is not always the best option.

What if I have no experience on a sailboat?

You are not likely to be offered the opportunity to go on an around the world trip if you have no sailing experience. Also, not everyone loves being out to sea, and you should take a shorter voyage to know whether or not you would like it first. A shorter voyage will also get you the experience you need to find a crew for a longer voyage.

When you travel across the world at the slow speed of a sailboat, it makes you aware of just how large the world truly is. The world is a huge and mostly empty place where you can sometimes sail for days and not see another boat. Even though you can see for miles in each direction and travel many miles each day, a long time can go by without you seeing a single ship.

If you think you would love sailing, there is a better than even chance that you will. However, other people can find sailing too tiring. The crew has to keep the boat going 24 hours a day, seven days a week, whether it is pouring rain out or not.

As well as there being a lot of work involved in sailing, there is also the possibility that you might find sailing boring, as it is not fast-paced. Probably, those who think they will love sailing will end up loving it - but there are no guarantees. Don't go off on a long voyage unless you know that you are happy on a short journey.

How can I get sailing experience if I have no sailing experience?

It may be a challenge, but you do have a chance of getting on a boat even if you have never been on a ship before. Don't lie about having any previous experience; instead, look for a crew that will accept a sailor without experience.

Sometimes, even an inexperienced sailor can find a boat just by walking around at the docks. If you live in or near a sailing town, you might be able to find a boat very quickly. Present yourself as a likable and trustworthy person, and you have a chance of getting on a boat with no sailing experience.

A shorter voyage can be a step towards a long one

After you get on a sailboat for the first time, you will probably decide you love it. You will love the escape from ordinary life, and how the night sky looks away from street lights. You will not usually think sailing is difficult or slow-paced.

Hopefully, you can meet the right people and learn enough about sailing that you are included on a trip around the world when someone you know decides to go. You do not need to go on a lot of shorter sailing trips before you sail around the world; you just need some rather than no experience.

How to sail around the world if you have a boat already

If you already have a boat, then you can get to the fun part a lot more quickly. There are still things to take care of in advance and to be mindful of while at sea, but you can get to your adventure sooner rather than later.

What route should you take sailing around the world?

Usually, people sail around the world on an eastward route. An eastward route is with the wind, so a westward route is more difficult. You can choose to take whatever route you want, but most people take an eastward route and follow the wind.

An eastward route means that you will sail from west to east, so you will be sailing west on an eastward route. If you are setting sail from the United States, you will first sail to the Panama canal and then sail west from there across the pacific.

After crossing the pacific, you should be north of Australia. Sail from there across the Indian Ocean and around the cape of good hope. From the cape, you can sail northwest again, eventually reaching the United States.

You can choose to sail to many other places as well, depending on how long you want to be at sea. For example, you could choose to sail from southern Africa up to Europe and the Mediterranean before returning to the United States.

One common alternative to the typical eastward route is to sail through the red sea and the Mediterranean rather than around South Africa. This is a somewhat faster route than sailing around the cape of good hope. Don't attempt this unless it is currently safe, as there are pirates off the coast of East Africa.

If you are looking for a more challenging route, you could sail under south America instead of using the Panama canal. A more daring option is to take the northwest passage and sail around North America. These routes take longer, and if you take the northwest passage, it is risky to sail through the arctic water.

How long does it take to sail around the world?

You can sail around the world in about 15 months, but it's better to spend a few years at sea and not rush the trip. If you try to make the trip in less than two years, you will not be able to stop anywhere for any length of time, as any delay means that hurricane season will cut you off for the rest of the year.

How much does it cost to sail around the world with your own boat?

While you are out to sea, you will spend $3000, $2000, or at the very least $1000 per month. If you try to spend only $1500 per month or less, you might have a lot of trouble. Higher numbers are more realistic, and if you stop a lot, the monthly cost can easily go over $3000.

You will also have to buy equipment, which adds to the cost of your boat and the daily cost of living. Equipment can cost you more than $15000, and it is dangerous to be out to sea with shoddy equipment. You will also be charged a fee - more than $1000 - when you cross the Panama canal .

You will also run into other fees while you are out to sea. Having your boat tied down during a hurricane will cost you around $500. You will also have to pay for storage, and you will run into other fees at ports.

Repairs are another part of your expenses, as you may have to pay $1000 or $2000 to fix your autopilot or engine. If you want satellite internet while you are out to sea, this will cost you about $120 per month, and you will only be able to use a very small amount of data. Nonetheless, $3000 a month is more than enough to pay for all of these expenses, and $1500 per month might be enough if you can keep your costs low.

Take everything into account, or else your expenses may be higher than you planned. You might rent a car when visiting a country, have to pay for medical expenses, or go to bars and restaurants. Expenses can appear suddenly and unexpectedly.

Some people also like to fly home during the middle of a long sailing trip. They want to get away from the sea for a while and then return to their boat and continue. Flying home only once or twice might not make your trip vastly more expensive.

Know exactly where you are going before you set sail

A sailing trip around the world has to be taken seriously and planned out properly in advance. You want to see as much of the world as possible on your adventure, so plan accordingly. When heading across the pacific, most sailors want to see Bora Bora, Tahiti, Samoa, and other famous pacific islands.

Estimate where you will be on each month of your trip

You should make a timeline even if you do not stick to it. You should know roughly where in the world you will be during each week or month of your journey. Without knowing where in the world you are going to be each month, it is not even easy to know how long you will be out to sea for.

Timing is also crucial for avoiding hurricanes. Sailing is an adventure in part because it is fairly dangerous. Don't make it any more dangerous than it typically is.

You absolutely have to avoid sailing through hurricane-prone parts of the world during hurricane season. Hurricanes can and do kill foolish sailors. You must time out your trip so that you sail through hurricane-prone parts of the world when there is no risk of a hurricane that time of year.

Take the wind direction into consideration. You can sail against the wind, but it is easier to sail with it. Know which way the wind will blow during each part of your journey.

Know as much about each place you are sailing through as possible

Is it safe to dock in each of the countries you plan to stop in? Some of the countries you are planning to stop in may be dangerous.

Are all of these countries considered safe for small groups of sailors? The last thing you want is to be taken advantage of somewhere where the law might not be able to help you.

Take care of everything in advance

Make sure you get everything done before you leave. Some things can only be done before you set sail and not in the middle of the trip. Get all of the paperwork you need, and get any vaccinations you need before the trip.

If you need visas to visit the countries you plan to visit, get this work done in advance. It will be much harder to take care of these things after you have already set sail. Go to your doctor for a medical examination before you leave, and take enough of any medication you need with you on your trip.

Make sure the boat is in excellent condition

Have a professional look at your boat first. There could be dangerous technical problems with your boat that you might not immediately notice. Be on the safe side and get your boat looked at properly first.

Buying a used boat is not always the best idea. The cost of fixing your boat may be more than you bought the used boat for in the worst cases. Going to sea with a serious problem with your ship could be a disaster, so let a boat mechanic take a look at your vessel first.

Prepare for emergencies

You and everyone you are sailing with should know what to do in an emergency. If a heavy storm hits you, what do you do? Everyone in your crew has to know what to do in these situations.

Pirates are still very real, and you have to know what to do if you encounter dangerous people at sea. The sea can be unpredictable, and your emergency plans should cover many different situations.

Taking the right emergency supplies with you is a must. Bring a life jacket, flares, and a fire extinguisher. Make sure you have clothing that will keep you warm and dry in whatever weather and climate you encounter. Have a list of numbers for all of the emergency personnel you might call if you are in danger.

Make sure your boat is still in good condition whenever you port

One of the most important things you can do for your own safety while out to sea is check your boat every time you stop at any port. Always make sure that your boat is still in good condition. More than a few people die sailing, and this is often because of not immediately noticing and fixing problems with their ships.

As well as maintaining your ship, you have to maintain other equipment. A broken satellite phone or broken radar could get you killed. Regularly test your equipment.

Obey the laws wherever you go

As soon as you sail close enough to the coast of any country, you are no longer in international waters and have to obey the laws of whichever country you are in. You cannot know a lot about the laws of each country you are visiting, but you should know a little. Be aware of any unusual laws that are relevant to sailors.

Be prepared to be away from home for years

Whether you are sailing away on your own boat or not, you are going to be away from home for a long time. While it is possible to sail around the world fast (the world record is doing it in only 40 days), an around the world sailing trip takes three or four years on average. Sailing around the world is not a vacation but an epic adventure that takes up a significant chunk of your life. Eventually, you will return to life on land, and you will see life differently after your sailing experience.

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I've personally had thousands of questions about sailing and sailboats over the years. As I learn and experience sailing, and the community, I share the answers that work and make sense to me, here on Life of Sailing.

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“QuickStart” to Choosing Your World Route and Timing:

Trade Winds, Cyclones and Currents

Posted: August 12, 2015

With limitless possibilities for sailing around the world, how do you select which way to go choosing the safest and most comfortable route around the world depends largely on the weather. most cruisers choose warmer climates, sailing down wind, avoiding areas/seasons of storms and hurricanes (called “cyclones” in the southern hemisphere) and using current boosts when possible. by looking at the probabilities of good conditions, it is possible to select a route for the most safe and comfortable sailing experience., trade winds: there is a more-or-less continuous flow of air called the trade winds. because the earth is warmer at the equator and colder at the poles, and because of the earth’s rotation, this flow is generally westerly (from the west) near the poles and easterly nearer the equator (as shown in the fig. 2)., a popular circumnavigation route (starting at the panama canal) follows the trade winds across the south pacific, north of australia, across the indian ocean south of the equator, around south africa, and back across the south atlantic as shown by the satellite track of our circumnavigation in celebrate ., note the large area of westerly wind in the far southern latitudes. you’ll find most round-the-world racers taking advantage of this wind and rounding the world eastbound instead of the more cruiser-friendly westbound. this far southern route is doable but is likely to be rougher, colder, and less pleasant along with being faster., avoiding cyclones/hurricanes: most cruisers avoid hurricanes by staying out of areas at times when they are most likely to occur. hurricanes are powered by warm ocean waters and the water is warmest at the end of summer. the worst major hurricanes/cyclones (“storms”) will occur in the northern hemisphere in july-october and in the southern hemisphere in december-april (although dangerous storms can and do sometimes occur outside these periods). as shown in fig 3, there are few cyclones at all in the south atlantic and the eastern south pacific., a suggested timing for the route pictured in fig. 1 is to depart panama in early february, arriving in french polynesia as the cyclone season winds down at the end of march. then, the direct route is to proceed through the cyclone zone (stopping along the way) to arrive in south africa in early november before the start of the next storm season in the indian ocean. then one crosses the south atlantic in mid january, early enough to get to the caribbean and leave prior to the start of its hurricane season in june. this “one-year” circumnavigation takes about 15 months and may sound like a rigid and speedy schedule but in reality there is considerable time and flexibility for sight-seeing. for example, rather than spending four weeks in french polynesia, you might choose to stay longer and spend less time in fiji., in order to have more time in the south pacific, you might choose to spend a summer (dec-april) in new zealand. note that to stay in sync with the storm seasons, any significant stopover adds a year to the circumnavigation route. by planning to spend the extra year, you don’t have to be in new zealand until november and you have an extra few months in the south pacific., some sailors choose to risk the storm seasons and plan on safe harbors and/or outrunning storms as demonstrated by the large number of boats that spend summers in the caribbean. this is ok as long as one understands the risks and prepares appropriately but i prefer not to take on this added risk., major ocean currents: the world has areas of major ocean currents such as the gulf stream (caribbean and eastern atlantic), agulhas (south africa), south atlantic and the north brazilian that must be considered while cruising the significant bodies of water that must be crossed. in general, the currents flow with the trade winds and are helpful to downwind sailors (except for about 500 miles rounding south africa). on the occasion of an adverse wind, however, be aware that a wind-against-current situation will cause an unpleasant and potentially dangerous sea-state., this article is intended just to get you started. the possibilities are limitless but by following the weather patterns, winds, and currents, you can plan a cruise which is safer and more comfortable..

yachting around the world

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My Cruiser Life Magazine

Sail Around the World Route – Best Options Explained

Before you ponder your route to sail around the world, think about why you’re even thinking about such an undertaking. 

There are countless sailing routes you can take to circumnavigate the globe, but each one is for a different sort of sailor. The two most common routes are the mid-latitudes “Milk Run” and the high-latitudes journey through the Southern Ocean or Northwest Passage.

Here’s a look at some of these very different trips and the types of sailors and vessels that accomplish each one every year.

Table of Contents

Basic planning factors – winds, currents, and storms, the classic sail around the world route – the milk run, circumnavigating in the southern ocean, an alternate sail around the world route the northwest passage, which sailing routes would you pick for your circumnavigation, sailing routes around the world faqs.

sailing around the world route

The Basics of Sailing Routes Around the World

First, some lingo. Sailors refer to a sail around the world route as a “circumnavigation.”

Taking a boat around the world requires some gumption. So why do it at all? For some, it is the goal of having done it. For others, it’s a fun way to combine their passions of sailing and travel. Some folks compete in races to see who can do it fastest. And some folks think it would be a good lark and a neat way to see the world.

Whatever reason draws you to the idea of completing a circumnavigation, you aren’t alone. Every year there are rallies or races that you can join to meet up with like-minded people. And for as many people who compete in rallies, there are likely an equal number of people doing it on their own. 

No matter how you cut it, a circumnavigation is made up of numerous legs. So if traveling and seeing the sights is your goal, then it only makes sense to take your time and visit as many places as you can along the way. 

Folks with a limited time frame will inevitably miss something or rush through someplace they want to see. 

For sightseers, the goal of a circumnavigation might be secondary to seeing the places they want to see. In other words, someone with their heart set on circumnavigating might set a schedule of two years to get it done, while another sailor who wants to complete loops in the Atlantic and Pacific might have a lot more time to visit more countries and ports of call. 

Every sailor and every boat comes into this adventure with different goals. Therefore, it’s important to think about your motivations and the sort of circumnavigation that you’d like to have. What’s the most important part to you, and how much money and time can you dedicate to the endeavor? 

Sailing Routes Around the World

Most pleasure boaters contemplating a circumnavigation are interested in the safest route to sail around the world. Part of the safety and enjoyment of the crew comes from planning the trip to follow the prevailing wind patterns around the globe.

When sitting on land, you might think of the wind as unpredictable and variable depending on the day and weather conditions. And while that is true all over the world, at sea prevailing weather patterns tend to be more steady. 

That means by understanding the causes and patterns in the winds, you can use them to your advantage on a circumnavigation. 

For example, let’s look at the North Atlantic circuit. If a yacht wants to depart Europe for North America, its best bet is to head south first and follow the area between 10 and 30 degrees north latitude westbound. Why? Because this is the area where the winds flow from the east almost constantly. Since ships used these winds to get to the Caribbean in the old days, they are still known as the Trade Winds. 

What if you want to go the other way, back to Europe? In that case, your best bet is to head north and make your easterly course between 40 and 60 degrees north latitudes. There, the prevailing winds are westerly and will push you back to Europe. 

While sailboats can sail into the wind, doing so is called “beating” for a reason. It’s rough on the boat and crew; it’s tiring and unpleasant. You’ll have to do it occasionally, but a successful and comfortable passage is usually the result of planning so you don’t have to sail to weather. 

Similarly, you can use the world’s ocean currents to your advantage. If the Gulf Stream can give you a knot or two of an extra push toward Europe, you should take it! It makes a big difference when your normal speed is six knots. Trying to fight against it for any length of time could double your trip planning and make for a very nasty ride.

And then there is the risk of storms at sea. With good trip and weather planning, a boat can circumnavigate without ever experiencing a bad storm at sea.

That requires conservative planning to avoid areas and times of the year when the weather is bad. To do this means you must plan to be in the right places at the right times. Pilot charts are published for every ocean sector on Earth, showing the prevailing winds for any given month and the probability of encountering a severe storm in the area. 

Using pilot charts and the historical prevalence of hurricanes or cyclones, sailors can plan to transit these areas only during quiet times. In other words, no one wants to be in the middle of the North Atlantic during peak hurricane season or during winter gales, but being in the middle of the North Atlantic in May is pretty optimal. 

Likewise, you don’t want to be in the middle of the South Pacific during February when it is peak cyclone season, but June or July is good.

The classic route for circumnavigating is based on the path of least resistance, making it the safest route to sail around the world. These routes utilize the prevailing winds to make as many downwind, fair-weather passages as possible. 

The goal of this route is not speed but comfort and safety. This is the route you take your family on. This is the route that around the world rallies, like the World ARC Rally , use for every trip. 

Starting from the Caribbean, this route travels westbound and keeps close to the equator. Of course, you can start anywhere, but many yachts cross their wakes (begin and end their voyage) somewhere in the Lesser Antilles. 

After crossing the Caribbean Sea, transit is arranged through the Panama Canal. Canal transits are expensive and time-consuming, and they usually involve a broker to arrange all the paperwork and scheduling. 

Before the canal was constructed, the only way to make the journey was to travel south in the Atlantic and pass Cape Horn. There, you can follow Drakes Passage through Argentina’s islands and Patagonia’s wild lands. Many expedition yachts still choose this route to see this remote and beautiful part of the world. 

After the Panama Canal, most yachts take familiar sailing routes across the Pacific . The first stop is the Galapagos Islands. This takes you mostly south along the coast of Central America and across the equator into the Southern Hemisphere.

From the Galapagos, the single longest passage lies ahead–roughly 3,200 nautical miles to the Marquesas Islands of French Polynesia. This trip takes most sailboats about 14 days. An alternate route takes you farther south. It doesn’t shorten the trip but allows you to visit Rapa Nui (Easter Island) and Pitcairn Islands.

Once in French Polynesia, you can island hop your way through the South Pacific island nations, but with a weary eye on the weather. The point is to avoid the area during cyclone season, roughly the summer months (December through April or so). 

At this point, many yachts find a hurricane hole where they can relax during storm season. Usually, it is time to haul out and complete some maintenance after so many sea miles. Some make it south and out of the cyclone belt to New Zealand or Australia. Others opt to stay in the islands but find a well-sheltered marina or boatyard where they can haul out.

Once cyclone season is winding down, the next big passage awaits. After passing through the Torres Straits, stops in Northwestern Australia and Indonesia welcome you to the Indian Ocean. There are only a few isolated stops after that. Many yachts make one long passage out of it, although many enjoy a few stops, like Cocos Keeling, Maldives, Diego Garcia, or Seychelles.

This is where the route branches in two directions. Traditionally, boats would transit on a northwest course and into the Gulf of Aden. From there, you follow the Red Sea to the Suez Canal and the Mediterranean Sea. The Mediterranean is, of course, one of the most storied cruising grounds on the planet. You can cruise from Turkey and Greece to Italy, France, and Spain, with countless famous ports of call along the way. 

Unfortunately, the route to get there, through the Gulf of Aden and around the Horn of Africa, is home to bands of pirates who have been known to prey on leisure yachts and commercial vessels alike. For this reason, this route has fallen out of favor in recent years. 

Instead, boats head to South Africa. The country makes a good landfall point from which you can travel home or take land excursions to see the rest of Africa. Popular stops on the way are the islands of Reunion and Mauritius. Some folks also like to visit Madagascar.

After rounding the Cape of Good Hope, yachts are back in the Atlantic and can head northwest toward the Caribbean. You can make a few stops along the way, mostly isolated island nations like St. Helena and Ascension Islands. After that, it’s a straight shot back across the equator and to the Windward Islands of the Caribbean. 

When coming from the Mediterranean, boats heat westbound through the Straights of Gibraltar. The next stop is the Canary Islands. How long does it take to sail across the Atlantic? It’s a roughly 17-day passage downwind to the Windward Islands.

sailing around the world on the milk run

Most people take two full years or longer to complete a circumnavigation as described above, but even that only allows a little time to see the sights. So a more realistic number would be four or five years. 

This route isn’t for those looking to get it done in the shortest amount of time. Instead, the Southern Ocean Route is the favored path for those looking to trade a bit of safety for speed. This route, due to the prevailing winds along the route, is completed from west to east. 

Races like the Clipper Around the World , Vendee Globe , and the Golden Globe Around the World Race use this path. It utilizes the open expanses of the Southern Ocean. Once you get into these high latitudes, there are no real landmasses in your way, and you can steer a course all the way around the world in record time.

Of course, the Southern Ocean is not for the faint of heart. High-latitude sailing involves biting cold weather and dangerous gales. You’ll be rounding Cape Horn through Drakes Passage, one of the dicest stretches of water on the planet. 

It’s a punishing stretch of ocean, and boats are often beaten and bruised. Dismastings and equipment failures are common. In other words, a sailor who chooses this route must be ready for anything, capable of handling whatever the sea throws at them, and sailing an extremely well-founded bluewater vessel.

sailing the southern ocean

In recent years it has been in vogue to attempt a transit of the Northwest Passage, thereby making it possible to circumnavigate the high latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere. Obviously, this is a summertime endeavor only, and even then, only during years when the ice pack has completely melted. This is happening more and more, so the route is gaining popularity.

The leg that makes this possible starts from the United Kingdom going west across the Atlantic to Greenland through the Labrador Sea. The Northwest Passage itself then bisects Canada’s northern territories. Finally, you end up on the northern coast of Alaska. Then, keeping the mainland of North America to port, you continue south into the Pacific Ocean.

From the Aleutian Islands, the most favorable course is to transit to the west coast of North America. After that, you can make your way south along the famous Inside Passage, a network of fjords in British Columbia that can link you to Puget Sound and the Seattle metro area. 

Once in the US, your next steps are southbound transits to Baja, Mexico, or jumps like sailing to Hawaii from California . You can then join the normal routes across the South Pacific islands to Australia or Southeast Asia.

Both the Southern Ocean and the Northwest Passage routes are high-latitude routes that carry more risk than the Milk Run. High-latitude sailing involves dealing with more frequent severe weather systems, stronger winds, and greater variability in the weather in general. They’re also farther from services and more remote, so self-sufficiency is even more vital. 

While you can do the Milk Run in nearly any of best bluewater cruising sailboats , these high-latitudes routes are more comfortable in a robust expedition-level vessel. These are the perfect places for that aluminum sailboat you’ve been dreaming about.

sailing around the world in the Northwest Passage

There is much to learn and think about if you want to circumnavigate. If you’re dreaming of sailing the world, consider starting your research by picking up a book or two written by someone who has done it. Here are three stories of circumnavigations, but there are countless others and blogs galore to be found on the internet. 

yachting around the world

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Jimmy Cornell is the master of how to sail around the world. His “World Cruising” series of guides includes everything you’d ever need to know, from weather systems and route planning to legal formalities. This book, 200,000 Miles , combines some of those technicalities with a biographical story of his journey.

yachting around the world

Sailing Around the World Alone is Joshua Slocum’s story of his journey. It’s not a modern tale–Slocum set out in the late 1890s from Nova Scotia. But his adventure is the OG tale of sailing around the world and is worth a read. 

yachting around the world

  • Used Book in Good Condition

Lin and Larry Pardey circumnavigated several times (both eastbound and westbound), but if you totaled up the miles they sailed, it would be more like seven times. The difference, of course, is enjoying every port and stop along the way.

While they never wrote a book specifically about sailing around the world, their cruising tales live on in the various tales and how-to guides they produced over the years. 

Capable Cruiser discusses techniques that will get you there, interwoven by the Pardey’s inimitable charm and wit. For more travel inspiration, check out their original series of books: Cruising in Seraffyn , Seraffyn’s European Adventure, Seraffyn’s Mediterranean Adventure, and Seraffyn’s Oriental Adventure.

What route do you take to sail around the world?

There are several ways to circumnavigate, but the most common is the “Milk Run.” This route goes from the Caribbean through the Panama Canal. From there, it heads south to the Galapagos Islands and into the South Pacific. After Tahiti, yachts head to Australia, across the Indian Ocean, and through the Suez Canal into the Mediterranean Sea. Finally, leaving the Med, boats cross the Atlantic to the Caribbean to close the circle, or “cross their wake,” as they say.

How long does it take to sail around the world?

The WorldARC around the world sailing rally usually lasts 18 months, but you can do it quicker by selecting fewer stops or taking faster routes. For most sailors, however, the length of the trip around the world really depends on how much they stop along the way and for how long. If the purpose of the trip is to travel and see the world, it makes little sense to rush and do it in the shortest possible time. Many circumnavigations take five or more years. 

How much does it cost per month to sail around the world?

Sailing has been described as the most expensive way to get somewhere for free. The cost to sail around the world is extremely variable–it is impossible to pin down any price. On the one hand, the type of boat makes a difference. The larger the boat, the larger the costs. The lifestyle you choose while sailing matters, too–lavish resort marinas cost more than anchoring away from town. Hiring professionals to do boat maintenance costs more than doing it all yourself. There are ways to do it lavishly and ways to be cheap about it. Comfortable cruising is somewhere in the middle, but where exactly that depends entirely on you. 

How big of a sailboat do you need to sail around the world?

Many solo sailors and couples have circumnavigated in boats less than 30 feet long. Lin and Larry Pardy wrote many novels as they circled the globe on 22-foot-long Seraffyn , a Lyle Hess-designed cutter. The size of the boat has everything to do with your cruising style and budget. So long as the vessel is well-founded and designed to take the rigors of bluewater passages, size matters less than many people think.

yachting around the world

Matt has been boating around Florida for over 25 years in everything from small powerboats to large cruising catamarans. He currently lives aboard a 38-foot Cabo Rico sailboat with his wife Lucy and adventure dog Chelsea. Together, they cruise between winters in The Bahamas and summers in the Chesapeake Bay.

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yachting around the world

Exploring the globe: Sailing around the world

  • Exploring the globe: Sailing around the world

Have you ever dreamt of embarking on a global adventure, where the vastness of the open ocean becomes your playground? Sailing around the world is an exhilarating journey that offers a unique blend of excitement, challenges, and unforgettable experiences. In this article, we'll delve into the intricacies of sailing around the world, providing you with insights on routes, preparation, and the wonders that await. So, hoist the sails and let's set sail on a virtual voyage across the world's oceans!

Choosing the right route

Selecting the right route is crucial for a successful circumnavigation. The choice of route depends on factors such as weather patterns, prevailing winds, and time of year. Sailors often choose between the traditional eastward or westward routes, with variations based on personal preferences and regional considerations.

Preparing for the journey

Getting the right yacht.

Your yacht will be your home for the duration of the journey, so choosing the right vessel is paramount. It should be seaworthy, equipped with essential amenities, and capable of withstanding various sea conditions. Many sailors opt for sturdy, ocean-going sailboats designed to handle long passages.

Essential skills and training

Embarking on a global sailing journey requires more than just a sense of adventure. Acquiring essential sailing skills and undergoing proper training is imperative. From navigation and weather analysis to emergency procedures, these skills are crucial for a safe and enjoyable voyage.

Provisioning and supplies

Proper provisioning is essential to ensure a steady supply of food, water, and other necessities throughout the journey. Sailors need to plan meticulously to stock up on non-perishables, water desalination systems, medical supplies, and spare parts for the yacht.

Read our top notch articles on topics such as sailing, sailing tips and destinations in our Magazine .

Navigating the challenges

Weather and climate considerations.

Sailing around the world exposes sailors to a myriad of weather conditions, from serene calms to raging storms. Understanding global weather patterns and the impact of seasonal changes is vital for route planning and safe navigation.

Dealing with isolation

Isolation can be both a challenge and a gift during a circumnavigation. Spending weeks or months at sea with limited human interaction requires mental and emotional resilience. However, the isolation also offers a unique opportunity for introspection and connection with the vastness of the ocean.

Safety measures

Safety should always be a top priority. This involves wearing appropriate safety gear, having reliable communication equipment, and adhering to best practices for avoiding accidents and emergencies.

Beautiful port of Alicante, Spain at Mediterranean sea.

Beautiful port of Alicante, Spain at Mediterranean sea.

The thrill of the journey

Encountering diverse cultures.

One of the most enriching aspects of sailing around the world is the chance to engage with diverse cultures and traditions. Visiting different ports and interacting with local communities provides a unique perspective on global interconnectedness.

Witnessing marine life

The oceans teem with diverse marine life, and a circumnavigation offers numerous chances to witness marine creatures in their natural habitats. From dolphins playing in the bow waves to majestic whales breaching the surface, these encounters are truly awe-inspiring.

Captivating sunrises and sunsets

Sailing offers front-row seats to some of the most breathtaking natural displays. Watching the sun rise and set over the horizon while surrounded by the expanse of the sea is a truly magical experience.

Setting sail: Step by step

Departure planning.

Embarking on a journey of this magnitude requires meticulous planning. From plotting the initial route to preparing the yacht and crew, a successful departure lays the foundation for the entire voyage.

Daily life onboard

Life at sea comes with its own rhythm. Days are spent navigating, maintaining the yacht, cooking, and indulging in quiet contemplation. Nights bring starlit skies and the gentle lull of the waves.

Exploring ports and landfalls

The thrill of reaching a new port after days at sea is indescribable. Exploring new landscapes, trying local cuisine, and connecting with fellow sailors and locals are highlights of any landfall.

Fastest circumnavigations in history

Over the years, sailors have achieved remarkable feats of speed in circumnavigation. The fastest solo circumnavigation record stands as a testament to human determination and skill, demonstrating the incredible potential of both sailor and vessel.

Embarking on a journey to sail around the world is a daring pursuit that promises adventure, self-discovery, and a profound connection with our planet's oceans. The challenges and rewards of such an endeavor are unmatched, making it an aspiration cherished by adventurers and sailors alike. So, whether you're an experienced sailor or a novice dreaming of the open sea, the world is waiting for you to cast off and explore its watery wonders.

So what are you waiting for? Take a look at our range of charter boats and head to some of our favourite sailing destinations .

FAQs about sailing around the world

How long does it take to sail around the world, what's the fastest sail around the world, how much does it cost to sail around the world.

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Do You Want to Sail Around The World? Here’s 7 Ways to Make it Happen!

yachting around the world

Are you dreaming about sailing around the world?

Thankfully, quite a few of us humans have thrown out the dated mentality that we have to grow up, get married, have kids, get a good job and then when we retire we can travel (or have fun). Who wants to wait until they’re 65 years old to sail around the world?

My family and I have been sailing around the world for over five years now.

And while doing so we’ve come across a wide variety of opportunities to sail around the world . Allow me to list them…

How to Sail Around the World – 7 Ways to Make It Happen

1. get paid to sail around the world.

Get paid to sail around the world

Review various crew-training courses and find a link between your skillset and crew jobs.

Qualifications include: Deckhands, Steward/ess, Engineering, Interior Training, Chef, all the way through to becoming a qualified Captain.

Our friend Stephanie is currently working her way up to being a Captain. To get her hours in, she’s spent time crewing on a 90’ motor yacht in the Caribbean, a 65’ sailboat in the Mediterranean and she’s now on a 120’ floating palace in the Pacific.

As her job qualifications increase so does her pay packet. AND… let’s not forget that she’s seeing the world in the process.

Gerald, another friend, works for a high-end sailboat manufacturer. He services all the sailboats currently making their way around the world in a three year organized around-the-world rally.

On each leg of the journey, he joins a different boat heading to the next destination. In-between passages he works on servicing the whole feet.

And these are just a few of many examples of how you can get paid to sail around the world.

If you want to do a professional sailing course, then courses from the American Sailing Association ( ASA ) and the  Royal Yachting Association ( RYA ) are good, internationally recognized options. The courses are offered by many sailing schools all over the world.

2. Volunteer to Crew on Smaller Sailboats

Want to sail around the world? Volunteer on smaller sailboats

Are you in a rush to get on a sailboat? Would you prefer to skip the qualifications and head straight for the experiential side of sailing? If so, get in touch with sailors that are currently sailing around the world and offer to volunteer your time.

We took four volunteers sailing across the Atlantic Ocean with us and have had several others join us for one or many long-distance passages.

You can find sailing couples and families on YouTube (many have Youtube channels), by searching for Sailing Bloggers, and by joining sailing groups (on Facebook for example).

And there are dedicated websites such as Crewseekers.net and Crewbay.com where you can create a profile listing your experience and information about where and when you’d like to sail.

When emailing or talking to a boat owner explain your desire to volunteer, any relevant skillsets, and your availability.

We’re always looking for an extra pair of hands but it’s great when we have guests that know about electrics, plumbing, woodwork, cooking, and those that are happy to help us entertain our seven-year-old!

3. Seek out Boat Sitting Opportunities

How to sail around the world? Boat sitting options

This is a great opportunity for those that want to sail around the world but don’t actually like sailing OR like the idea of sailing but get seasick.

Most boat owners making their way around the world take time out to go home. They’ll often find the safest marina they can but leaving a boat is scary for a boat owner.

Some owners find boat sitters that will babysit the boat for a few weeks or even months.

There’s often no exchange of money but both parties win. The boat owner has someone keeping an eye on things and the boat sitter gets free accommodation in a variety of awesome spots.

To find these opportunities, simply search on Google, ‘ boat sitter jobs ’.

4. Date a Single Boat Owner

a sailboat sailing around the world

This might seem like a crazy objective but it happens all the time.

Boat owner boy or girl meets non-boat-owner girl or boy. They fall in love and the boat owner says, ‘let’s sail around the world’. The rest is history.

To increase your chances of success, hang out in marinas and yacht clubs.

Of course be careful, because you do end up sharing a small living space in often very remote places. But, I’ve heard many beautiful love stories.

5. Go on a Sailboat Cruise or Join an Around the World Race Boat

Going on a sailboat cruise is a way to sail around the world

Some sailboats continuously go around the world. You can choose the area you want to see and pay for that particular leg of the journey.

If you have the funds to go all the way around the world, bonus. If not, you can do a different leg every year until you achieve your goal.

6. Set up a Boat Share

Want to sail around the world? Set up a boat share

Find some friends that have similar ambitions as you have. Pool your money together to get a boat. Once the boat is obtained, work on a plan to sail it around the world.

There are several syndicate boat owners making their way around the world doing one to two passages a year.

The owners work year-round but take vacations to sail the boat to the next destination. This makes it a great way to sail around the world while keeping your job.

7. Buy Your Own Boat

dog on a sailboat

This isn’t as difficult as it may seem. For US$40,000 you could get a reasonable boat to sail around the world in.

Many boaters sell their house, buy a boat and turn to a nomadic sea life. The key issue is to find a source of income while sailing around the world.

Renting out property, working online and finding work-from-home jobs are ways that many people make it work.

Or, there are those that buy a boat and sail it six months out of the year and return home to work for six months.

Before you buy a boat though, do a lot of research.

Boats require more maintenance than you probably thought (it sometimes feels like the work never ends!). And, if you want to sail around the world the boat you choose needs to be up to the job.

I’d recommend reading all the blogs you can find about living on a sailboat and about sailing around the world. Watch Youtube videos from people who are currently sailing around the world to get inspired and to get an idea of what it would be like to do this yourself.

Also Read: How to Work Remotely From Anywhere in the World and My Experiences Sailing Across the Atlantic

Sail Around the World. Make it Happen!

Sailing around the world is one of the most exhilarating, fulfilling, and incredible ways to see the world.

And you don’t have to wait until you win the lottery to make it happen.

Tip: if you want to get more sailing experience, or want to figure out if sailing around the world is really for you, chartering a boat is a good option. When you volunteer as crew, the owners often don’t have the time or ability to teach you real sailing. But when you charter a boat with a captain, the captain is there to, literally, show you the ropes.

Or, charter a boat without a captain if you know how to sail already and want to build miles and perhaps try out different boats.

I know, chartering a boat may sound expensive, but split the cost with friends (or post a message in a sailing group on Facebook to share a boat with other sailing enthusiasts) and it will all of a sudden cost you barely more than a hotel room.

Click&Boat is one of the best websites to charter a sailboat in most countries around the world.

Renting a boat in Greece is a popular option to build miles and gain experience, as I describe in this article .

Whichever way you choose to start your sailing adventure, I hope I’ll see you on the sea soon!

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Like this article about how to sail around the world? Pin it!

Have you fantasized about sailing around the world? It might be a lot easier to make this dream a reality than you think! These are 7 ways you could make it happen: sail around the world in a way that works for you!

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17 thoughts on “Do You Want to Sail Around The World? Here’s 7 Ways to Make it Happen!”

I would love to have the chance to sail the 7 seas!!

Where can I find a person looking for a traveling worker/friend? Hopefully that’s how they would see a person to circumnavigate the globe with anyway. I Just don’t want to feel like I’m on an adventure with my boss. I’m extremely serious about sailing around the world. Really looking to try and find someone with a fire under them to start a trip sooner rather than later. One or two people to help me getting the whole thing going from the acquisition of a boat to finish. CHEAPLY will be a great adventure.

Hi Ben, did you try connecting with other people through sailing forums or sailing Facebook groups? You are very likely to find people there who are interested in sailing around the world in the same way as you are.

Hi ben! did you ever make your journey around the world on a sailboat? I want to do the same thing even if I have to give a little and pay a little.

Great post. Thank you heaps. Would love to set sail soon. If theres any single ladies with an ocean cruising boat out there looking for a friendly sailor to date, hit me up 😉. Cant wait to circumnavigate the planet with you.

I would love to spend a year at sea. Just need a way to do it!

So glad to have found your site! All my husband is doing is looking at boats for sail and talked of leaving his job to sail around the world. It sounds wonderful, but we have a 7 year old and one about to leave for adulting in 1 1/2 years. So I just don’t know how to take that leap. He is ready to get away from his crazy job. So many things to think about as a mom and I know my kids would learn SO much more in life than just common core stuff the US is currently teaching.

I want to sail around the world. Well I’m dying and I can’t be cured so my last wish is to buy a sailing boat like an ocean going yacht and just pack some food and normal provisions and just cast off and set sail. I’m looking to buy an old boat that’s ok for the open seas and just go. I know how to rig the sails and basic things but I can’t read maps or do the compass but that’s not a problem. I have sourced ocean yacht that has got the milage behind it but it’s an old wooden boat. I’m not too worried as it’s a sound boat but i need to know how to set the auto pilot and set the course from here in the uk to america first stop. ive got at least 8 months left in my life so I want to just head out to sea. The boat is 22 ft long. It’s a good solid boat as far as I’m told. It has a compass and an inboard engine and it can be crewed by 1 man. I’m kinda disabled so I thought I would set the mainsail and then the other 2 sails and just get the boat out off the harbor and then just follow the coast around till I get to the open sea and then head towards the north star and see where it takes me. I don’t know how to use the radio but it should be simple I guess. I’ve got plenty of excess fuel for the inboard engine and a tank of fresh water. I have no charts as I can’t read them but I’m guessing head along the English channel till I get to the Atlantic ocean then head towards Ireland and then from there head towards America across the Irish sea. I ain’t got no licenses for radio but that’s not a problem if it ain’t going to be used.

I want to do this trip before I pop off to the promised land and the time by my self will help me to come to terms with what I’ve got to come. Anyway, any help in telling me instructions on what to do on my boat as to keeping engine and lighting working and how to do the autopilot and the other instruments will be a help.

It’s something I’ve longed to do sail a yacht on the ocean as they say you don’t know till you try it. Please any tips would be helpful.

Love this post! Trying to achieve the dream right now, can’t wait to finally take the leap and buy the boat 🙂 Am loving reading about your other adventures.

Haha I absolutely love this post idea and dating a boat owner is definitely my favorite! 😀 Maybe I’ll add that to my bucket list, cause I can definitely see me sailing around the world! Also, your pictures look stunning!

I would love to sail around the world but alas I can get quite sea sick! Definitely need to take more meds or natural remedies to be able to complete this challenge! Wouldn’t mind dating a boat owner for it either 😀

Since buying my own boat is impossible, I actually love the idea of being a boat caretaker! I really didn’t think there was something like that but it sounds about perfect. You get to live on a boat without investing any money at all, for weeks! What an amazing idea 😀

Wow sounds just awsome!!

LOL I somehow don’t think any of those will happen for me – but I had no idea there were so many options to sail around the world. And, if you could find me a dating site where I could filter out ‘single boat owners’ who are also millionaires, that would be a good starting point…

Sounds like a dream come true if you don’t get seasick! I would love to sail around the world. Just looking at your photos entices me to do it. But as I do get terribly seasick I don’t think I would have a good time.

Those pictures look absolutely stunning! I have been sailing before, but always close to land, where the water is “friendly” 🙂 I’m not sure if I have the stomach to cross complete oceans though 🙂

Date a single boat owner! Ha, that’s funny. More likely than buying my own boat though. What an adventure!

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Around-the-World Cruises: Everything Travelers Need to Know About These Epic Voyages

By Scott Laird and Mark Ellwood

AroundtheWorld Cruises Everything Travelers Need to Know About These Epic Voyages

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An around-the-world cruise is often thought of as the pinnacle of a  sailing vacation . Some cruisers treat these multi-month journeys as once-in-a-lifetime trips; others are frequent guests, a world cruise but one piece of their annual travel plans. There are also the enduring tales of older travelers who elect for extended world voyages as an unconventional retirement plan . (Though as onboard WiFi becomes more reliable, it's now possible to work remote from many cruise ships, as well.)

Whatever the reason, the allure of this mode of travel is strong. Why not unpack once, enjoying fairy godmother-like service, exemplary amenities, and always-changing views for months on end? Plenty of cruisers with time and money on their hands do exactly that, choosing an extended at-sea lifestyle for at least a portion of the year. Around-the-world cruises often run from early January through March or April, although new off-season itineraries are being introduced.

If an epic voyage across multiple oceans and continents fits into your future, be prepared to plan the trip far in advance. World cruises have a strong following among cruisers—many of the sailings can sell out up to a year before departure. Travelers can also book shorter “segments” joining the ship for only a portion of the journey, but cruise lines often add significant value-adds to those booking the entire voyage—everything from free business class airfare to other exclusives like special parties and invite-only shore excursions.

Here's everything travelers need to know about taking an around-the-world cruise, including tricks from veteran world cruisers, booking tips, and some of the best itineraries in 2025 and beyond.

This article has been updated with new information since its original publish date.

Booking tips for around-the-world cruises

How much is a cruise to go around the world.

World cruises, which may not actually circumnavigate the globe entirely, but are generally in a category that covers at least three continents and lasts from 90 to 150 days, generally start around $140 per passenger per night based on double occupancy. All in all, the cost of 100-plus day world cruise can range from $16,000 to over $800,000 per person, depending on the line and cabin type.

Is an around the world cruise worth it?

That’s certainly subjective, but travelers already accustomed to cruising—who appreciate the amenities of a ship and the lifestyle of a new port to view through the window every few days—will likely consider world cruises good value.

How much does a 180-day cruise around the world cost?

The longest world voyages we found generally lasted up to 140 to 150 days at their upper limits, although Oceania Cruises world cruises can be 180 days or more, starting at $48,799 per passenger.

Advice from frequent world cruisers

Roger Foenander and his partner David Mutton—loyalists to Viking Cruises —note the lack of pressure to see and do things within a tight timeframe on longer journeys, which provides plenty of freedom to relax. That might mean attending onboard enrichment lectures, spending the afternoon playing cards with fellow passengers, or dipping into the onboard spa and sauna before cocktail hour.

Linda Wiseman, who has traveled with Cunard , suggests new faces can help get ahead of any monotony: “In the dining room, we tell the maître d’ not to seat us with another couple who is sailing the whole thing—that way, our seat mates switch every few weeks, and we can meet different people.”

New Orleans-based philanthropist and veteran world cruiser Phyllis Taylor observes that these sailings are a class set apart, without the frenzied pace of shorter itineraries: “The difference between a short cruise and a  world cruise  is night and day, storm and calm, fleeting thought and thoughtfulness. I enter the bar in the evening, in no time my favorite song is being played, my favorite drinks sit before me. I go to dinner and my favorite table is waiting for me, and my waiter has already served the iced water with lemon just as I like it."

But the real value of a world cruise, Taylor says, is the chance to fully immerse in and savor the experience: “With an extended cruise you absorb the lifestyle of life at sea; with the great advantage of having a crew and staff that treats you like royalty.”

The best around-the-world cruise itineraries

Silversea Silver Cloud

You can book world cruises in their entirety or join one leg of the journey for a shorter voyage.

Silversea’s 136-day sailing onboard their newest ship, Silver Dawn , will embark in Tokyo in January 2025. Called Controtempo , the cruise will sail in the opposite direction and season of many world cruises, taking in Japan and China in January before heading to Southeast Asia, Sri Lanka, the Maldives , and Seychelles in February. The ship will spend the spring making its way up Africa’s Atlantic Coast—arriving in the Baltic Sea before cruising to Iceland and Greenland (an uncommon call for World Cruises), then tracing Newfoundland and New England to New York.

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Fares start at $77,560 “Port-to-Port” or $79,060 “Door-to-Door,” which includes business class airfare and transfers—including pickups and drop-offs in the traveler’s home city.

Princess Cruises

Most world cruises departing from North America head to sea in January, but in 2026 Princess Cruises will be offering 114-day World Cruises during the northern summer. Departing in early May from Auckland, New Zealand; or Sydney or Brisbane, Australia (mid-autumn in the Southern Hemisphere), the sailings are timed to arrive in Western and Northern Europe during the peak of summer, promising endless sunny days.

The sailing also has a number of long stretches of sea days for cruisers who like time to unwind and enjoy the amenities of the ship, Crown Princess . Some of the longer ocean crossings, like Brisbane to Bali and Colombo, Sri Lanka to Aqaba, Jordan will take a week or longer, while three other ocean crossings are at least four days.

Inside cabins start at $15,588 per passenger or from $22,248 for Princess Plus fares, which includes beverages, WiFi, and onboard gratuities.

Crystal’s land partnerships with parent company Abercrombie & Kent are front and center during their 2025 World Cruise , a 123-night sailing departing from Fort Lauderdale on January 7 onboard the Crystal Serenity —fresh off a complete refurbishment that reduced the total number of cabins, which now all offer butler service in every room or suite category.

With port calls in South America, Africa, India, the Middle East, and Europe, Crystal will offer guests a number of overland packages in partnership with Abercrombie & Kent—think multi-night side trips to the Galápagos Islands , Machu Picchu, the Serengeti, Taj Mahal, or Karnak Temple.

Guests booking Crystal's full World Cruise will have included Business Class airfare, $1,500 shipboard credit, luggage valet, and airport transfers. Fares start at $66,500 per passenger based on double occupancy in an Ocean View Deluxe stateroom.

Regent's luxury world cruises tend to sell out far in advance.

Regent's luxury world cruises tend to sell out far in advance.

Regent Seven Seas

Regent Seven Seas Cruises has already opened their 2027 world cruise for booking—and they have a tendency to sell out quickly. It will be the first year a larger Explorer Class ship, the Seven Seas Splendor , will undertake the world voyage, calling at 71 ports en route from Miami to New York in January 2027.

The routing will take the ship from the Caribbean to the Pacific coast of Mexico via the Panama Canal, Hawaii, several ports in French Polynesia (calling twice at both Moorea and Bora Bora), Australia, Southeast Asia, India, the Persian Gulf, the Eastern and Western Mediterranean, and Bermuda before arriving in New York.

Early bookers will get a long list of added amenities, including first class airfare, a pre-cruise gala in Miami, exclusive shoreside experiences in Panama City, Colombo, and Málaga , unlimited shore excursions, unlimited beverages, gratuities, transfers, door-to-door luggage service, and unlimited laundry, dry cleaning, and pressing. Fares start at $91,449 per passenger and go up to $839,999 per passenger for the ship’s most luxurious suite.

Oceania Cruises

Many world cruises depart in January and sail in the 100- to 140-day range, mostly wrapping up by April or May. Oceania’s 180-day world cruises last until midsummer, and are often “true” around-the-world sailings, ending in the same port they first embarked from.

Oceania’s 2025 Global Horizons sailing lasts a whopping 196 days onboard Insignia , roundtrip from Miami. The sailing includes several destinations in the Eastern Caribbean, and—extraordinary for a world voyage—a week of scenic cruising along the Amazon River . The voyage continues in South America before crossing the Atlantic to the remote islands of Tristan de Cunha, a British Overseas Territory, before making landfall again in Namibia , tracing the African coast through South Africa, Mozambique, and the French department of Mayotte (another rare stop for a cruise), island-hopping in the Indian Ocean before calling in India.

The sailing covers a lot of ground in Asia—Thailand, Malaysia, Vietnam, Singapore, China, Japan, the Philippines, Brunei, and Indonesia—before cruising the west and south coasts of Australia, New Zealand, New Caledonia, Vanuatu, Fiji, French Polynesia, and Hawaii. Crossing the Pacific to San Diego the ship then hops down the coasts of Mexico and Central America through the Panama Canal before returning to Miami in mid-July.

Oceania’s 2026 Around the World in 180 Days sailing is also roundtrip from Miami. Sailing westbound, the itinerary covers the east and west coasts of South America, the South Pacific, Australia, Southeast Asia, and much of the Middle East before transiting the Mediterranean to spend significant time in northwestern Europe and the Baltic Sea before crossing the far north Atlantic via Iceland and Canada before returning to Miami.

Starting fares for each of the world voyages currently range from $48,799 to to $57,999, including a number of value-adds like roundtrip airfare and airport transfers, plus a number of added onboard amenities.

The Safest Sailing Routes Around the World (Which to Avoid)

There are several ways you could sail around the world, but if you want to minimize the inevitable risks, there's really only one way to go. Let's take a look at places to go and places you should definitely avoid.

What is the safest sailing route around the world? Sail from the Atlantic westward to the Caribbean, using the trade winds, crossing the Panama Canal, the South Pacific Ocean, and then either around Cape of Good Hope or through the Suez Canal. The safest sailing conditions are along the equator since it provides the most reliable sailing weather and calmest waters.

There are certain places you want to avoid if possible, but you will need to compromise. Below, we'll explore how to find the right way for you.

Key takeaways: Avoid the Gulf of Aden, the Cook Strait, the Drake Passage, the Timor Sea, and the Southern Ocean if possible. Sail close to the equator and use the Panama Canal.

Trying to circle the Earth is fine. Doing that on a boat is among the most complicated ways to go about such a thing. The knowledge required and the number of variables that can go wrong is sky-high. But it is also among the most, if not the most rewarding ways.

yachting around the world

On this page:

Choosing the right path, the fast route, the pleasure route, what routes to avoid.

Choosing the right route can be the difference between success and failure. If you choose the right one and time it well, it can be literally smooth sailing all the way , where your biggest worry will be the occasional maintenance.

If you choose the wrong route, though, you will have your hands full the whole time, and the chances you giving up will go up.

What are the best routes to sail around the world?

  • The fast route - through the Southern Ocean. This route is fast but also more dangerous due to unpredictable weather.
  • The pleasure route - staying as close to the equator as possible. This route will be safer, with more reliable sailing weather.

yachting around the world

21 Places to Avoid Sailing Around the World (In Order)

Let's have a closer look at both of these - this is a big deal, so we gotta explore the details to know what we sign up for.

The idea here is to pick the safest one. And since safety is a relative term , let's have a look at two main points of view.

yachting around the world

What's the fastest sailing route around the world? The fastest sailing route around the world is the sail south from the Atlantic towards the Southern Ocean (Antarctica) and circumnavigate the world around Cape of Good Hope and Cape Horn. Sail back up north to the Atlantic starting point to complete the circumnavigation.

Being away on the sea poses risks - some of which you can avoid, some of which you can't. The conclusion being that the longer you are out there, statistically, the higher the chance something will break or that you will be unable to outrun bad weather - or that you will bump into something - since trash floating in the oceans and breaking boats is, unfortunately, a thing now.

yachting around the world

Wear and tear is an intrinsic part of sailing; many sailors say that. For instance, Atlantic crossing is more about maintenance than actual sailing skill. The longer you are out there, the more you expose your boat to elements, and things are bound to break.

Similarly, if you plan for a longer route, you have to have more things with you in terms of provisions and equipment. That means a heavier load on the boat, which affects handling and takes up space.

41 Sailboat Cruising Essentials To get an idea of what you'll require to bring on a long sailboat cruise, we've made a list of 41 cruising essentials you should definitely bring along. Read all about cruising essentials

And last but not least, there is the mental aspect of it all. Though you might feel up to the task now, being on the sea for a long time can prove tricky - whether that be because of loneliness (or the constant presence of people you might not see eye to eye with) the relative mundanity of the scenery or the lack of civilization.

So if you want to avoid all that as much as possible, choose the route chosen by those who are in a hurry - such as Vendée Globe racers.

The fastest route around the world

Starting in the European North Atlantic, this route runs south to the South Atlantic. Once it gets into the waters of the Southern Ocean (the one surrounding Antarctica), it stays there, circles the globe, around the Capes, and then up the South, and eventually up the North Atlantic again.

yachting around the world

Know that this is not really much of a scenic route or a route that would show you the most interesting parts of the world - it is solely aimed at getting around as fast as possible in the most straightforward way possible.

As mentioned, the overarching principle here is to make the journey as fast as possible - and that is where the safety of this route lies in - exposing yourself to the risk for the least amount of time possible. That being said, be careful around the Cape Horn - an infamously tricky place to navigate.

And for those of you who are looking at the globe while reading this, thinking it is a bit of cheating - since you don't really go around, but circle the globe at its thin end - know that the length of this route is more or less 26,000 nautical miles, which is very roughly the length of the equator. So you will be doing the work in the end.

What's the safest sailing route around the world? The safest sailing route around the world is to stay as close to the equator as possible to make use of the more favorable winds there. This route requires sailing through the Panama and Suez Canals, the Caribbean, the Mediterranean, the South Pacific, and the Atlantic.

The above route might be fast, but it is about technically getting around, not really about the enjoyment of the world you are circling. So if that is what you have in mind, if you are not particularly in a hurry and don't mind stopping here and there to enjoy the local cuisine and whatnot, this one might be for you.

Speaking of stopping, the above route also doesn't allow for many stops. And that is what the safety of the Pleasure Route lies in. It keeps you close to the coast quite often, so you don't have to plan as much when it comes to consumables, spares, and energy - and if something breaks, you can dock at the next opportunity and have it repaired.

You will never be far from civilization (as far as circumnavigations go). With all the ports available, situations that would otherwise prove risky, like running low on water or wear and tear, can be tackled with relative safety.

The safest route around the world

This route runs from the Caribbean through the Panama Canal, then crosses the South Pacific to get to the shores of Australia, then through the Indian Ocean towards the countries of Southeast Asia and maybe India, then down towards South Africa with a stop or few on the way, eventually getting into the South Atlantic and back to the Caribbean.

If you find yourself in Europe, you will probably get to the Canaries first, then continue to the Caribbean. And similarly, towards the end of your route, after passing South Africa, you will go up to the Canaries and then back to Europe.

yachting around the world

Looking at the map, you will see this route certainly doesn't have speed in mind but rather providing the traveler with enough opportunities to stop and admire. You can see Panama, then stop at Galapagos, visit the Pitcairn Islands, New Zealand, Australia, Indonesia, Srí Lanka, India, Madagascar, South Africa… and that is just touching on to the major points of which there can be twice as much if you want to.

If you read diaries of those who went down this route, you will see this is indeed the case most of the time - stopping at a place and enjoying it, rather than leaving the port immediately after a shopping trip and a good night's sleep. It is a great way to get to know the world from many sides and is the true traveler's path.

How long does it take to sail around the world? It can take anywhere from 100 days up to 20 years. We've compared three sailing speeds for both sailing routes for you. Read all about circumnavigation speed

There really is no whole route that would pose risks, rather places you might feel enticed to go through to save time, only to regret this later. We have picked out places that you are likely to want to go through if you circumnavigate, so have a look and if you see your picks below, be careful.

The Gulf of Aden is pirate territory

Among these is the Gulf of Aden. All those films about pirates hijacking cargo ships? Yep, that's the place. Just about anybody will strongly advise you against it since it poses a man-made danger like no other place on the sea in the world. Why do people still take it when going from the Mediterranean to the Arabian sea or vice versa? Because the alternative means a circa 17,000 kilometers long detour around the whole continent of Africa.

The Cook Strait and Drake Passage are very unpredictable

Also, avoid the Cook Strait, a passage between the North and the South islands of New Zealand. These are among the most unpredictable waters in the world.

yachting around the world

The same goes for the Drake Passage, between the southernmost tip of America and Antarctica. High winds, very strong currents, and high chances of icebergs make this a deadly zone. We list it in the Fast Route, and it can be navigated without damage, but it requires skill. If you are not confident, avoid it.

The Timor Sea has 100 storms per year

Timor Sea - if you go north of Australia into the Southeast Asian regions, be careful - 100 storms per year is nothing out of the ordinary here. Even big oil rigs have to be constructed differently there to withstand the constant bad weather, with evacuations of the workers to the shore being nothing special.

The Southern Ocean is difficult to navigate

The Southern Ocean. Yes, yes, I know, the very route we suggested. While it is true what we said, that it is the fastest route around the globe, it is where the freezing waters around the Antarctic meet the warm waters up north. That results in storms and swells, which, paired with icebergs and the whole place being remote, thus unlikely to offer much help, means one tricky ocean to sail through.

Just as is the case with the Drake Passage, the idea here is not to forbid you from entering it, if you have got the skill - but rather to warn you if you do not.

The two routes mentioned above are among the most famous ones - one for speed, one for its beauty. They both have their advantages and disadvantages but are often traveled, so as far as safety goes, both have a lot to offer. Choose wisely.

Chocolate Angel Richardson

iS THERE ANYWAY TO GET THIS ARTICLE? iT ONLY PRINTS OUT WITH A BUNCH OF ADVERTISEMENTS. i DON’T SEE A PRINT ANYWHERE??? tHANK YOU

william wieckert

Sissy rosenstein.

If I go near Somalia what are my chances of getting gang raped by pirated?

Francis Drelling

Your articles on this topic are great. Do you think you might write one simply telling the best, and the worst, times to sail in the warriors regions where people circumnavigate? That way we could use it as a guide as we ponder our routes.

would like to find out about the red tape involved for entering a forign port/country & staying awhile

Your safest path around the world takes your right through the Gulf of Aden, which in the next paragraph you say to avoid.

You don’t build a barn dumbass. What do you think this is, 1785?

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Charter Season: 7 of the World’s Best Yachting Locations

From the French Riviera to the British Virgin Islands, Luxury Defined explores seven glamorous yachting destinations around the globe

Does anything even approach the romance, adventure, and freedom of cruising the Seven Seas in a luxury yacht? The vessel is built to enhance, embrace, and refine every aspect of life at sea. The best designs emphasize space, fixtures, finishes—and creature comforts.  

The superyacht dials all that up to 11 by maximizing livability with such amenities as swimming pools, personal watercraft (a minisub , anyone?), satellite links, private chefs, outdoor entertainment decks, cinemas, even helipads.    

For any sea traveler, though, the best leg of any voyage is the voyage home . This edition of Luxury Defined showcases the world’s most livable yachting destinations, and the homes that equal—or even exceed—superyacht luxury.  Welcome home, sailor, home from the sea.  

1. The French Riviera  

French Riviera coastline

Perhaps the most glamorous seaside destination in Europe, the French Riviera , or Côte d’Azur, draws the sailor and sunseeker alike. Picture-postcard villages and chic beach resorts line the coast from the cosmopolitan glitz of Saint-Tropez and Cannes to the unspoiled beauty of Port-Cros.  

The winter resort city of Nice, with its ample sunshine, white sand beaches, and special events such as the Cannes Film Festival attract a who’s who of international glitterati. West along the coastline, past the jet-set destination of Saint-Tropez, the island of Porquerolles awaits, with a peaceful escape from the bustle of the mainland.  

Waterfront estate on French Riviera

2. Costa Smeralda, Sardinia, Italy  

Coast of Italy

Sardinia’s Emerald Coast is a playground for the jet set, and its dramatic, unspoiled coastline and luxury marinas draw yacht folk from all over. The marine grottoes of Cala Gonone and the rock formations of Capo Testa, shaped by centuries of sea winds, are favorite attractions.  

While the quaint towns of Carloforte and Castelsardo provide local color, the exclusive Yacht Club Costa Smeralda offers dining, a clubhouse, and spa services. Sailors can explore the tiny islands of the Maddalena archipelago or the white sandy beaches and rocky cliffs along the Gallura coast. Tranquil sunset viewing turns to fine dining and sizzling nightlife in the exclusive restaurants, clubs, and discos of Porto Cervo and Porto Rotondo.  

Italian estate on the coast

3. The Greek Islands

Greek islands

Surrounded by its “wine-dark” seas and thousands of islands, ancient Greece prospered with a maritime culture that became the cradle of Western civilization.  

There is plenty left to explore, from the natural beauty of its uninhabited isles to the beaches and cosmopolitan nightlife that have made islands such as Mykonos into global destinations. Yachters can stop for an archaeological exploration on Rhodes or Delos, a night on the tiles in the tavernas of Athens, to the nightclub scene of Mykonos, Corfu, and Crete, the largest of the Greek islands.  

The adventure starts in the ancient seaport of Piraeus, in southwestern Athens. Zea Marina is one of the finest, full-service marinas in the Mediterranean, offering 670 berths for vessels up to 492 feet.  

Greek Islands waterfront home

4. The Bahamas  

Yachts in The Bahamas

The 700 islands of The Bahamas begin at Bimini, just 45 miles off the coast of Miami, and stretch 500 miles southwest to the islands of Great Inagua and Little Inagua, neighboring the Turks and Caicos Islands.  

The Bahamas were made famous by Ian Fleming (the islands featured in the James Bond spy thrillers Casino Royale , Thunderball , The Spy Who Loved Me , Never Say Never Again , and License to Kill ). But they’ve been a haven for sailors and swashbucklers since the 18th century.  

They’re a paradise below the waterline, too, for sport fishing, snorkeling and scuba diving. Palm-lined beaches, nature preserves, world-class golf courses, and colorful Colonial-style villas welcome seafarers ashore.  

Bahamas waterfront estate

5. The Florida Keys  

Florida Keys

The Florida Keys arc southwest from Virginia Key in the Atlantic Ocean (just south of Miami Beach) to Loggerhead Key in Dry Tortugas National Park, a remote seven-island archipelago in the Gulf of Mexico, 70 miles off Key West. The islands are easy to navigate. Cruising in the Keys can mean a leisurely and scenic sail through the shallow interconnected basins of Florida Bay or a more adventurous trip out on the open waters of the Atlantic.    

But it’s not all plain sailing. Mariners can drop anchor in a coral cove to swim, snorkel, or fish, or drop anchor in Islamorada, the “Sportfishing Capital of the World.”  Of course, a trip to the Keys is not complete without a visit to continental America’s southernmost city, Key West, otherwise known as the Conch Republic—a place described as “close to perfect and far from normal,” where flip-flops are the official footwear and every day the sunset is applauded.  

Florida Keys waterfront home

6. The British Virgin Islands  

British Virgin Islands

One of the world’s great sailing destinations, the BVI comprises four main islands—Tortola, Jost Van Dyke, Anegada, and Virgin Gorda. There are 50 more islands and cays, including Necker Island (Sir Richard Branson’s private paradise) and Salt Island, home of the wreck of the RMS Rhone, and hundreds of tiny palm-lined islets, sandbars, and rocky outcroppings to navigate, bounded by the beautiful Sir Francis Drake Channel, named after the Elizabethan admiral.   

There are countless draws for mariners: calm currents, steady trade winds, and protected bays. It’s a treasure trove, quite literally—some say it’s buried on Norman Island at the southern tip of the archipelago, made famous by Robert Louis Stevenson’s Treasure Island . Today, The Bight, one of the BVI’s most popular (and beautiful) anchorages, enchants seafarers with its sea caves, wreck-diving, and the infamous Willy T floating pirate bar and restaurant.   

British Virgin Islands waterfront home

7. Bermuda  

Bermuda

Bermuda has been the crossroads of the North Atlantic voyage since the town of St. George’s was settled by shipwrecked sailors in 1609. Between March and November each year, racing yachts from around the globe arrive in the harbors of St. George’s and Hamilton parishes to compete in regattas organized by Bermuda’s many sailing clubs. Thanks to the Gulf Stream, the island’s temperate climate is a year-round draw for leisure travelers, who come to cruise the island’s Great Sound and soak up the sun and local culture. The warm waters are ideal for scuba diving, whether it’s to explore marine wildlife habitats or historic shipwrecks that dot the reefs around Bermuda’s perimeter.

Bermuda house

Still exploring the Seven Seas? Set sail for luxury yachting homes here .  

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About the Clipper Round The World Race

About the race

The Clipper Race is one of the biggest challenges of the natural world and an endurance test like no other.

With no previous sailing experience necessary, before signing up for the intensive training programme, it’s a record-breaking 40,000 nautical mile race around the world on a 70-foot ocean racing yacht. The next edition will be the Clipper 2025-26 Race and will begin in late summer 2025. The route is divided into eight legs and between 13 and 16 individual races including six ocean crossings. You can choose to complete the full circumnavigation or select one or multiple legs.

The brainchild of Sir Robin Knox-Johnston, the first person to sail solo non-stop around the world, the first Clipper Race took place in 1996. Since then, almost 6,000 Race Crew from all walks of life and more than 60 nations have trained and raced in the Clipper Round the World Yacht Race; the only race in the world where the organisers supply a fleet of identical racing yachts (eleven), each with a fully qualified skipper and first mate to safely guide the crew. Crew complete four levels of intense ocean racer training before they compete. Mother Nature does not distinguish between female and male, professional or novice. There is nowhere to hide - if Mother Nature throws down the gauntlet, you must be ready to face the same challenges as the pro racer. Navigate the Atlantic Tradewinds and Doldrums en route to South America, endure the epic Roaring Forties, experience Indian Ocean sunsets, face the mountainous seas of the mighty Pacific - and bond with an international crew creating lifelong memories before returning victorious.

Seize the moment, unleash the adventure.

The Clipper Round the World Yacht Race is the only event of its type. Anyone, even if they have never stepped on a boat before, can join the adventure.

Maddie Church

History of the Race

Since the first Clipper Race crew left Plymouth in October 1996 on board eight 60-foot yachts, the race’s increase in size is almost immeasurable.

Today more than 5,000 people and three generations of Clipper Race ocean racing fleets have competed in what is known to be the world’s toughest ocean racing challenge.

The route of each edition of the race is unique, often formed by Host Ports around the globe. In the race’s twenty five year history, more than fifty cities have played host to the Clipper Race.

Click here to further explore the history of the race.

The third generation of one-design Clipper Race yachts debuted in the Clipper 2013-14 Race, proving to be faster and more dynamic than previous Clipper Race yachts.

The eleven 70-foot yachts make up world’s largest matched fleet of ocean racing yachts. Designed by renowned naval architect Tony Castro, they are the shining jewel in the Clipper Race crown, perfectly adapted to this gruelling sailing challenge.

Click here to learn more about the Clipper 70s.

Sir Robin Knox-Johnston

Over 50 years have gone by since Sir Robin Knox-Johnston made history by becoming the first man to sail solo and non-stop around the globe in 1968-69.

One of nine sailors to compete in the Times Golden Globe Race, Sir Robin set off from Falmouth, with no sponsorship, on 14 June 1968. With his yacht Suhaili packed to the gunwales with supplies he set off on a voyage that was to last just over ten months. He arrived back in Falmouth after 312 days at sea, on 22 April 1969, securing his place in the history books.

Sir Robin wanted everyone to have the opportunity to experience the challenge and sheer exhilaration of ocean racing because there are far more flags of success on the top of Mount Everest than on the high seas.

Among many other races, in 2007 Sir Robin has circumnavigated again in the VELUX 5 OCEANS race at the age of 68. In addition, Sir Robin competed in the 10th anniversary edition of the Route de Rhum race which started in St Malo, France, on 2 November 2014, and finished at the Caribbean island of Guadeloupe.

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How to buy tickets for the Olympic Games Paris 2024?

Tickets for the Olympic Games Paris 2024 are available for spectators around the world only on the official ticketing website. To buy tickets, click  here .

The Paris 2024 Hospitality program offers packages that include tickets for sporting events combined with exceptional services in the competition venues (boxes, lounges) or in the heart of the city (accommodation, transport options, gastronomy, tourist activities, etc.).

The Paris 2024 Hospitality program is delivered by the official Paris 2024 Hospitality provider, On Location.

For more information about the Paris 2024 Hospitality & Travel offers, click here .

What is the official mascot of the Olympic Games Paris 2024?

The Olympic Games Paris 2024 mascot is Olympic Phryge. The mascot is based on the traditional small Phrygian hats for which they are shaped after.

The name and design were chosen as symbols of freedom and to represent allegorical figures of the French republic.

The Olympic Phryge is decked out in blue, white and red - the colours of France’s famed tricolour flag - with the golden Paris 2024 logo emblazoned across its chest.

When and where are the next Olympic Games?

The Olympic Games Paris 2024 will take place in France from 26 July to 11 August.

What sports are in the Olympic Games Paris 2024?

  • 3X3 Basketball
  • Artistic Gymnastics
  • Artistic Swimming
  • Beach Volleyball
  • Canoe Slalom
  • Canoe Sprint
  • Cycling BMX Freestyle
  • Cycling BMX Racing
  • Cycling Mountain Bike
  • Cycling Road
  • Cycling Track
  • Marathon Swimming
  • Modern Pentathlon
  • Rhythmic Gymnastics
  • Rugby Sevens
  • Skateboarding
  • Sport Climbing
  • Table Tennis
  • Weightlifting

Where to watch the Olympic Games Paris 2024?

In France, the 2024 Olympic Games will be broadcast by Warner Bros. Discovery (formerly Discovery Inc.) via Eurosport, with free-to-air coverage sub-licensed to the country's public broadcaster France Télévisions. For a detailed list of the Paris 2024 Media Rights Holders here .

How many athletes compete in the Olympic Games Paris 2024?

Around 10,500 athletes from 206 NOCs will compete.

How often are the modern Olympic Games held?

The summer edition of the Olympic Games is normally held every four years.

Where will the 2028 and 2032 Olympic Games be held?

Los Angeles, USA, will host the next Olympic Games from 14 to 30 July 2028. Brisbane , Australia, will host the Games in 2032.

What is the difference between the Olympic Summer Games and the Olympic Winter Games?

The summer edition of the Olympic Games is a multi-sport event normally held once every four years usually in July or August.

The Olympic Winter Games are also held every four years in the winter months of the host location and the multi-sports competitions are practised on snow and ice.

Both Games are organised by the International Olympic Committee.

Which cities have hosted the Olympic Summer Games?

  • 1896 Athens
  • 1904 St. Louis
  • 1908 London
  • 1912 Stockholm
  • 1920 Antwerp
  • 1928 Amsterdam
  • 1932 Los Angeles
  • 1936 Berlin
  • 1948 London
  • 1952 Helsinki
  • 1956 Melbourne
  • 1968 Mexico City
  • 1972 Munich
  • 1976 Montreal
  • 1980 Moscow
  • 1984 Los Angeles
  • 1992 Barcelona
  • 1996 Atlanta
  • 2000 Sydney
  • 2004 Athens
  • 2008 Beijing
  • 2012 London
  • 2016 Rio de Janeiro

What year did the Olympic Games start?

The inaugural Games took place in 1896 in Athen s, Greece.

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Oyster Yachts announce they are back in profit with World Rally proving popular

Yachting World

  • May 14, 2024

Oyster Yachts has announced it is back in profit, six years after the company went under in early 2018.

yachting around the world

Oyster returned to profit in January this year and expects to make an overall profit for 2024 following a 29% year-on-year increase in turnover to £56.4m. After launching 32 yachts in 2022, the shipyard says its build bays remained full for the 2023 financial year.

Oyster reports that over the same year the company grew its staff by a third, expanding its service network, refit, after-sales support, crew, and charter services, following an additional £14.5m investment by owner and chairman Richard Hadida.

Ashley Highfield, CEO of Oyster Yachts, said: “We are confident Oyster is now in a strong position and has the resources and facilities to service our vessels world-wide and provide owners with truly personalised support. Investing heavily in the founding principles of Oyster Yachts is translating into stronger business results.”

The British boatbuilders dramatically ceased operations on 5 February 2018 after the private equity firm which had been supporting the company withdrew its financial backing. It was swiftly bought by software entrepreneur Hadida, who poured millions of pounds of investment into the company.

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Hadida also drove changes to the company including a streamlined range – and the introduction of smallest Oyster for many years, the Oyster 495 in 2022 – greater in-house control of design and manufacturing, and the introduction of Lloyd’s Register surveyors to instil consumer confidence after the Polina Star keel failure in 2015 (a contributing factor to the company’s previous financial woes).

The company also refreshed its marketing strategy. One of the key drivers of new boat sales has been the success of the Oyster World Rally , with around a quarter of new boat orders coming from Rally entrants.

Oyster has announced that entries will open for the 2028/29 rally on 18 June this year. The 2024/25 rally is currently underway and, remarkably, the 2026/27 rally is already full. Places are limited to 30 yachts for the 2028 edition, and organisers expect the 16-month tour to sell out swiftly.

The Oyster World Rally is an impressive sailing circumnavigation, fully supported by Oyster’s Rally team. Organised exclusively for Oyster owners, the Rally attracts a diverse group of international owners of all ages, along with their families and friends.

The fleet of 30 Oysters enjoys the world’s finest bluewater cruising over 16 months, logging a total distance of 27,000 nautical miles.

A variety of Rally packages are available from the Adventurer, standard package, up to a very VIP Voyager package including crew and consierge.

If you want to know more, you can join Oyster’s live Q&A Webinar , on June 5 th 2024.

You can find out more about the Oyster World Rally , and follow the current fleet as they explore French Polynesia.

If you enjoyed this….

Yachting World is the world’s leading magazine for bluewater cruisers and offshore sailors. Every month we have inspirational adventures and practical features to help you realise your sailing dreams. Build your knowledge with a subscription delivered to your door. See our latest offers and save at least 30% off the cover price.

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Orcas Sink 50-Foot Yacht Off the Coast of Morocco

T he boat-ramming orcas are back in action: Two people had to be rescued from a sailing yacht in the Strait of Gibraltar after the black-and-white marine mammals damaged the vessel so badly it later sank, reporters Reuters ’ David Latona.

The incident occurred around 9 a.m. local time Sunday, some 14 miles north of Cape Spartel in northern Morocco. Passengers aboard the 50-foot Alboran Cognac felt blows to the yacht’s hull and saw that the rudder had been damaged. As water began leaking onto the ship, they contacted the Maritime Rescue Coordination Center in Tarifa, Spain, which directed them to prepare for an emergency rescue.

About an hour later, a nearby oil tanker picked up the two crew members, who were customers of Spain-based Alboran Charter , which owns the yacht, reports the Washington Post ’s Dan Rosenzweig-Ziff.

The boat took on more water and sank soon after. It’s not clear how many orcas targeted the vessel.

The sinking of the Alboran Cognac is the latest in a string of incidents involving orcas and ships in the Strait of Gibraltar. The highly intelligent, social marine mammals made headlines last spring , when they sank a Swiss yacht called Champagne off the coast of Spain. In November, they brought down another ship , a Polish sailing yacht called the Grazie Mamma .

But the animals’ unusual behavior goes back even further: Since 2020, mariners have reported 700 interactions between orcas and ships in the Strait of Gibraltar, per Reuters. The Alboran Cognac is the fifth vessel orcas have sunk in the last three years, reports Live Science ’s Harry Baker.

Most of the incidents have been recorded in the Strait of Gibraltar, a waterway linking the Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea. The strait, which is bordered by Morocco to the south and by Spain to the north, is home to a distinct—and critically endangered —subpopulation of fewer than 50 orcas .

However, last June, orcas also rammed into a ship in the North Sea between Scotland and Norway, roughly 2,000 miles away from the Strait of Gibraltar. Scientists weren’t quite sure what to make of that incident, which raised the possibility that the destructive behavior was spreading to different groups of orcas.

In the meantime, authorities are urging mariners in the Strait of Gibraltar to exercise caution this summer. Spain’s Maritime Safety and Rescue Society recommends avoiding a large area between the Gulf of Cádiz and the Strait of Gibraltar; the agency also suggests that mariners sail as close to the coast as possible, especially from May to August, when orcas are more likely to be in the region.

If sailors do encounter orcas, the agency recommends they keep the vessel moving and head toward shallower waters. People onboard the ship should remain in the middle of the vessel and not approach the sides, where they may be at risk of falling overboard.

The agency also asked mariners to notify authorities of any orca encounters and, if possible, to take photographs of the creatures for identification.

Scientists remain puzzled by the orcas’ destructive behavior. A leading hypothesis is that a female nicknamed “White Gladis” started ramming into ships after having some sort of traumatic run-in with a vessel; she may also have been pregnant when she first started targeting ships. Since orcas are social creatures, other members of White Gladis’ group may have simply followed her lead and mimicked her actions.

“The idea of revenge is a great story, but there’s no evidence for it,” said Lori Marino , a neuroscientist and the founder and president of the Whale Sanctuary Project, to BBC Newsbeat ’s Shaun Dacosta last year.

Another possibility is that the orcas are curious about ships, or maybe, they’re just having fun.

“They’re probably socializing, yucking it up with each other about their adventures without realizing the terror they’re creating in their moments of joy,” said Andrew Trites , a marine mammal researcher at the University of British Columbia in Canada, to Business Insider ’s Erin Heger last summer.

Orcas have also been known to temporarily exhibit other unusual behaviors, like placing dead salmon atop their heads. The boat-ramming behavior may be another, similarly short-lived fad that the Strait of Gibraltar orcas will eventually move on from.

And they may already be doing just that: Between January and May 2024, the number of reported interactions with orcas was 65 percent lower than during the same period in 2023 and 40 percent lower than the average for those months across 2021, 2022 and 2023, according to the Atlantic Orca Working Group .

Whatever the orcas’ motivations, scientists have urged onlookers to avoid assigning human emotions to the animals’ behaviors. Though the boat-ramming killer whales have given rise to internet memes and merchandise that suggests they’re plotting an “ orca uprising ,” researchers argue that the marine mammals are not acting with malicious intent.

A subpopulation of orcas in the Strait of Gibraltar (not pictured) have interacted with roughly 700 boats since 2020, causing five of the vessels to sink.

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Spain warns boats of possible orca run-ins near the Strait of Gibraltar this summer

FILE - An Aerial view of Gibraltar rock seen from the neighbouring Spanish city of La Linea, Oct. 17, 2019. The ramming of a small boat by an orca in the Strait of Gibraltar prompted authorities in Spain to recommend Tuesday May 14, 2024 that small vessels stick to the coastline in that region to avoid often-scary interactions with killer whales. (AP Photo/Javier Fergo, File)

FILE - An Aerial view of Gibraltar rock seen from the neighbouring Spanish city of La Linea, Oct. 17, 2019. The ramming of a small boat by an orca in the Strait of Gibraltar prompted authorities in Spain to recommend Tuesday May 14, 2024 that small vessels stick to the coastline in that region to avoid often-scary interactions with killer whales. (AP Photo/Javier Fergo, File)

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BARCELONA, Spain (AP) — After another ramming of a boat by an orca in the Strait of Gibraltar, Spanish authorities recommended small vessels stick to the coastline in that region to avoid often-scary interactions with killer whales during the summer.

In the latest incident, two people aboard a 15-meter (50-foot) boat in Moroccan waters requested help from Spain’s maritime rescue service Sunday after reporting that an orca knocked the craft several times, damaging its rudder and causing a leak. The people were picked up by a passing oil tanker summoned by the rescuers, and their boat later sank.

Spain’s ministries for transport and the environment, along with its merchant marines, issued notices Tuesday urging both sailing boats and small motorboats to beware of orcas between May and August in the area between the Strait of Gibraltar and the Gulf of Cadiz.

The Atlantic Orca Working Group, a team of Spanish and Portuguese marine life researchers who study killer whales near the Iberia Peninsula, says were 197 such known interactions in 2021 and another 207 in 2022.

FILE - Geert Wilders, leader of the far-right party PVV, or Party for Freedom, talks to the media, two days after winning the most votes in a general election, in The Hague, Netherlands, on Nov. 24, 2023. Anti-Islam firebrand Geert Wilders is on the verge of brokering a four-party coalition in the Netherlands six months after coming in first in national elections, opening the prospect that yet another European Union nation will veer toward the hard right weeks ahead of EU-wide elections. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong, File)

A pod of orcas even disrupted a sailing race last year, when a boat sailing from the Netherlands to Italy had a 15-minute encounter with the animals, prompting the crew to drop their craft’s sails and raise a clatter to fend them off.

There have been no reports of attacks against swimmers. The interactions on boats seem to stop once the vessel becomes immobilized.

The researchers say that the killer whales seem to be targeting boats in a wide arc covering the western coast of the Iberia Peninsula, from the waters near the Strait of Gibraltar to Spain’s northwestern Galicia.

The orcas off the Iberian coast average from 5 to 6½ meters (16-21 feet) in length, compared to orcas in Antarctica that reach 9 meters (29½ feet).

yachting around the world

Killer whales ram and sink sailing yacht off Gibraltar coast

The Alboran Cognac was rammed by an unknown number of orcas in the Strait of Gibraltar at around 9am local time on Sunday, the Spanish maritime rescue service said.

Tuesday 14 May 2024 11:54, UK

yachting around the world

Orcas have sunk a yacht off the coast of Gibraltar - the latest in a string of similar attacks by the mammals over the past four years.

The Alboran Cognac sailing vessel was rammed by an unknown number of killer whales in the Strait of Gibraltar at around 9am local time on Sunday, the Spanish maritime rescue service said.

Two people were on board, who reported feeling blows to the boat's hull and rudder before it started taking on water.

They had to be rescued by a nearby oil tanker after they radioed the coastguard for help. The pair were taken to Gibraltar for safety, while the yacht was left adrift and later sank.

There have been around 700 interactions between orcas and ships since the trend emerged in the area in May 2020, according to the research group GTOA.

They believe such attacks could be the result of the orcas' playful curiosity or the animals confusing boats with competitors for bluefin tuna - their favourite prey.

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Experts claim these incidents, which have been confined to the strait that separates Spain and Portugal from Africa, are the work of a sub-population of around 15 orcas.

In May last year, a yacht called The Mustique was severely damaged by several of the whales and had to be towed to Cadiz.

Guidelines issued by the Spanish Transport Ministry stipulate that whenever ships observe any alteration in the behaviour of orcas - such as sudden changes of direction or speed - they should leave the area as soon as possible and avoid further disturbance to the animals during the manoeuvres.

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Every interaction between a ship and an orca must be reported to authorities.

Although known as killer whales, endangered orcas are part of the dolphin family. They can measure up to eight metres long and weigh up to six tonnes as adults.

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