Heritage Series

Robust building techniques and a simple standard rig make this a good first-boat choice for young families and juniors. — Boats.com

A small boat built in a big way, the 170CC is fully featured center console boats that can take you anywhere.

These center console boats give you more interior room which means more space for people, equipment and fish. Comfortable seating for six, loads of storage, a stable Deep-V hull, and unsinkable construction make these center console boats stand out and stand up to the sea.

170CC Virtual Tour

170cc specifications, features & options gallery.

Bow area with toast accented cushions with anchor locker

Additional info, if available, will be shown here.

Stainless cup holders

Standard Features

  • PermaGrid® Fiberglass Stringer System
  • Limited Lifetime Structural Hull Warranty
  • NMMA, ABYC & CE Certified
  • Self Bailing Non-Skid Decks
  • No Wood, All Composite Construction
  • Closed-Cell Foam Flotation
  • Variable Deadrise Deep V Hull
  • High-Density Composite Transom
  • White Gelcoat Hull Color
  • Stainless Steel Bow and Stern Lifting Rings (3)
  • Welded 316L Stainless Steel 1” Split Bow Rail
  • 8″ Stainless Steel Cleats (4)
  • Heavy Duty White Rubrail with Black Insert
  • Folding Stainless Steel Transom Boarding Ladder w/ Grab Handle
  • Portable 6 Gallon Fuel Tanks (2)(2)
  • 3/8″ Clear Acrylic Windshield
  • Stainless Steel Steering Wheel
  • Hydraulic Steering w/ Tilt Helm
  • Ritchie Compass
  • Welded 316L Stainless Steel Console Grab Rail
  • LED Navigation Lights
  • LED Cockpit/Livewell Lighting
  • 1000 GPH Auto/Manual Bilge Pump (1)
  • Console Switch Panel with waterproof switches, circuit breakers, 12V Outlet, Waterproof Electrical Connectors, Tin-Plated Copper Wiring & Group 24 Battery with Battery switch
  • Console Interior Light
  • Heavy-Duty Marine Grade UV Resistant Vinyl Upholstery
  • Custom Convertible Fiberglass Helm Seat/Leaning Post w/ Storage
  • Premium Console Cooler Seat w/ Cushion & Backrest
  • Transom Quarter Seats w/ Cushions & Backrests (2)
  • Transom Jump Seat Storage Compartments
  • Insulated Bow Locker Storage w/ Overboard Drain

Yamaha F115 Four Stroke

Optional Features

Hullside Color Dark w/ White Bottom

  • COLORS: Stars & Stripes Blue

Hullside Color light w/ White Bottom

  • COLORS: Pewter, Ice Blue, Sea Foam Green
  • Canvas Suntop – Black, Navy, Toast
  • Console Cover – Black, Navy, Toast
  • Garmin EchoMap Chirp 74CV with GT24 Transducer
  • Fusion Stereo RA55 with JL Audio 6.5″ M3 Speakers (2)
  • Lenco Trim Tabs
  • Removable Ski Pylon
  • Fishing Package: 17 gal Baitwell, Raw Water Washdown, Extra Gunwale Rod Holders, Stainless Steel Console Rod Racks, Built-In Stern Mounted Tackle Box

The Great Island Hopper

With plenty of storage and quick-action versatility, this center console was created for island get-togethers.

170cc The Great Island Hopper

Stable and Solid

Sea capabilities to the max for this smaller-sized center with great handling even in rough conditions — stability within 17 feet.

170cc Featured

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2022 Bayliner Element M17

  • Updated: October 5, 2021

Bayliner Element M17 running

Building on the successful Element Series and its strategy to increase boater participation, Bayliner announced the launch of the Element M17, the next iteration of its award-winning Element series. Bayliner’s Element M15, which launched in 2020, was recently named among the 2021 Boating Industry’s Top Products Awards.

With an overall length of 17 feet and starting at an inclusive price of $18,995, the Element M17 is built on the same foundation that has defined the Element Series models offering smooth handling and on-water accessibility to appeal to the next generation of boaters. The Element M17 features an upgraded seven-person capacity with ample space throughout the helm and cockpit, as well as options for fishing and water sports activities.

Bayliner Element M17 beached

From bow to stern, the Element M17 features:

  • A rounded M-hull transition for a smooth and enjoyable ride
  • Premium upholstery with detailed stitching and color-matched piping
  • Ample storage at the helm and transom storage with non-slip texture
  • Nine integrated cupholders and USB ports for comfort and convenience

Additionally, the Element M17 is powered by a standard 60HP Mercury Marine outboard engine offering award-winning performance and reliability, or optional 75HP or 90HP.

Read Next: Our Test of the Bayliner Element F18

“The Element Series represents a thoughtful combination of quality and intuitive design touchpoints providing a pathway for increased boater participation,” said Corey Duke, General Manager. “We’re thrilled to be adding to our award-winning lineup with the Element M17 offering our consumers additional capacity as we continue to lead the marketplace in offering superior performance at an accessible and inclusive price point – all with the goal of making the on-water experience easy, relaxed and incredibly fun.”

Bayliner Element M17 inshore

The Element’s standard pricing structure is inclusive of the boat, trailer, and a 60HP engine. Three optional upgrade packages with a focus on convenience and a seamless customer purchasing experience are also available, including:

  • “M Sport” package – includes a 6-foot Bimini top, automatic bilge pump, stereo, snap cover, and ski tow pylon for water sports
  • “M Comfort” package – includes “M Sport” options plus bow filler cushions, bow block off, stainless steel upgrade, and portside lounge seat with cupholders
  • “M Fish” package – includes an aerated livewell, fish finder, bow casting platform and seat, and a trolling motor bracket

The Element M17 will be on display for the first time at the Annapolis Boat Show and the Fort Lauderdale International Boat Show in October. To learn more about the all-new Element M17, click here.

About Bayliner

Headquartered in Knoxville, Tennessee,  Bayliner  is a recognized global leader in the fiberglass recreational boating industry. Through quality craftsmanship and a diverse product offering, Bayliner strives to make boating an accessible, affordable pastime for everyone worldwide. For more information, visit  bayliner.com . Bayliner is a brand of Brunswick Corporation (NYSE: BC).

  • More: 0-20ft , Bayliner Boats , Boats , outboards , Runabouts

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BoatingNarrative

What Size Motor Do I Need For A 17 Foot Boat? (How to Know!)

In order to know what size motor you need for your 17 foot boat, it’s important to understand how much power is necessary to push the boat through the water and the variables that impact this (such as the size of the motor and the weight of the boat).

There are a lot of things that people do wrong when choosing a motor, but once you understand the different factors that come into play, it becomes much easier to make an informed decision.

In this article, we’ll talk about what size motor do I need for my 17 foot boat?

What Size Motor Do I Need For A 17 Foot Boat

Here’s What Size Motor Do I Need For A 17 Foot Boat:

Typically, you need at least a 20 horsepower outboard motor for a 17-foot boat. However, some boats have smaller motors, such as the 7 to 12 hp range.

Many new boat owners face this same problem. It is challenging, if not impossible, to know which engine is the best one. Most motor manufacturers can recommend the correct engine for a boat. For some engines, this may not be the one you want.

What Size Motor Is Best For a 17 Foot Boat?

What Size Motor Is Best For a 17 Foot Boat

The topic of what size motor is optimal for a 17-foot boat has no simple answer. The size of the motor you require is determined by a variety of factors, including the hull of your boat, how you plan to use the boat, and your budget.

When picking a motor for a 17-foot boat, there are a few things to keep in mind:

  • The hull of your boat will affect how much power you need. A heavier boat will require a more powerful motor.
  • How you plan to use your boat will also affect the size of the motor you need. If you intend to use your boat for cruising rather than racing, you will need a different size motor.
  • Your budget is another important factor to consider when choosing a motor for your boat. More powerful motors will be more expensive.

When it comes to calculating the appropriate motor size, which is optimal for a 17-foot boat, there is no one-size-fits-all solution. The motor size you require is determined by the following factors on your specific boat and how you plan to use it. Talk to a professional to find the right size motor for your boat.

Considerations When Choosing The Right Motor

Considerations When Choosing The Right Motor

There are a few crucial considerations to make when choosing a motor for your boat. The most important factor is how much weight your boat will be able to carry and how much fuel it will need.

A lot of variables, such as throttle, shaft size, and cruising rpm, impact these two factors, so there isn’t an easy answer. To choose the right motor, you first need to know what kind of boat you have.

The size of the motor will also depend on the type of boat. 

  • A pontoon boat will need a different size motor than a fishing boat. 
  • When choosing the right motor for your 17 foot boat, there are a few things to consider. 
  • The first thing to consider is the weight of your boat. The heavier your boat is, the more power you will need from your motor. 
  • The second thing to consider is the type of water you will be using your boat in. If you are using your boat in calm waters, you won’t need as much power as you would if you were using your boat in rough waters. 
  • The third thing to consider is how fast you want to go. If you are just using your boat for leisurely activities, you won’t use nearly as much power as you would if you were racing your boat.

Once you have considered all of these factors, you can then decide on the size of motor you need for your 17 foot boat.

How Much Does a Motor Cost?

This is a difficult question to answer because there are many factors to consider. The size of the motor, the type of motor, the brand, and the features all play a role in the cost of the motor.

The size of the motor is one of the most important factors to consider when determining the cost. A bigger motor will typically cost more than a smaller motor. The type of motor is also important. A four-stroke motor will typically cost more than a two-stroke motor. The brand of the motor is also a factor. Some brands are more expensive than others.

The features of the motor also play a role in the cost. A motor with an electric start will typically cost more than a motor without an electric start. A motor with higher horsepower will also typically cost more than a motor with lower horsepower.

Ultimately, the cost of the motor will depend on the specific motor you are looking at. You can’t get an all-encompassing response to this topic.

How Big of A Motor Can You Put on A 17 Ft Boat?

The size of the motor will be determined by the size and weight of the boat. The max horsepower for a 17 foot boat is 300 hp. You want to make sure that the motor is not too big for the boat. If it is too big, it can be bad for the boat and can cause damage. 

Most 17 foot boats can hold up to a 115 hp motor. The size of the motor also depends on the type of boat. A fiberglass boat will be able to hold a bigger motor than an aluminum boat. 

A small boat will need a different size motor than a much larger boat. In addition, make certain that the motor has adequate power to run the boat for an extended period of time. The motor should have enough torque to run the boat at top speed for a long period of time.

A 70 hp motor should be enough for most 17 foot boats. Make sure you obtain the right size motor for your boat. If you’re unsure, you can always talk to a professional. They will be able to help you find the right size motor for your boat.

What Determines Max Hp on A Boat?

There are a few factors, but the three primary ones are the hull’s safe carrying capacity, the amount of stress the hull can withstand, and the type of watercraft.

  • The hull’s safe carrying capacity is the weight limit of the boat and everything it can safely carry. This includes the weight of the boat, the engine, the fuel, the passengers, and any cargo.
  • The amount of stress the hull can withstand is determined by its design and the material it is made from.
  • The type of watercraft also plays a role in determining the maximum hp.

Some of the factors affecting are:

  • The size and weight of the boat
  • The type of hull
  • The type of engine
  • The type of propeller
  • The type of fuel
  • The type of water

Common Mistakes When Determining The Motor Size

Common Mistakes When Determining The Motor Size

In order to determine how much power you need, there are several frequent blunders that individuals make.

One mistake is getting a motor that is too large. This can be expensive and may use more fuel than you need. It can also make your boat less versatile.

Another mistake is getting a motor that is underpowered. This can make it difficult to get your boat up to speed and can be dangerous in rough conditions.

The amount of power you need will depend on the size and capacity of your boat. The capacity plate on your boat will list the maximum weight and number of people your boat can safely carry.

You also need to consider the type of boat you have. Sterndrive boats need more power than boats with outboards. Outboards are more versatile and can be used on a wider variety of boats.

Finally, you need to consider how you will be using your boat. If you want to go fast, you will need more power than if you are just slow cruising.

Can I Put a Bigger Motor on My Boat than It’s Rated For?

Most boat manufacturers rate their boats with a certain size motor in mind. This is the size motor that the boat is designed to handle. Putting a bigger motor on a boat than it is rated for can be generally bad for a number of reasons. 

  • More horsepower than the boat is designed for can put undue stress on the hull and other parts of the boat, leading to damage. 
  • A bigger motor will usually have more cylinders than a smaller one and thus will consume more fuel. Running the boat at high speeds can put a strain on the engine, which can be expensive. 
  • A bigger motor can also damage the boat’s propeller and maybe even bend long shafts, leading to shaft damage. 
  • Finally, a bigger motor will usually mean less fuel economy, meaning you will have to fill up the tank more often. 

So, what can you do to give your boat more oomph? Talk to a professional. They will be able to help you find the right size motor for your boat and advise you on the best way to get the power you want without damaging your boat.

Are Two Motors Better than One?

Most people think that having two motors on a boat is better than just having one. However, this is not always the case. Having two motors can actually be more expensive and require more space.

They are also heavier and use more fuel, which can increase fuel consumption. Additionally, two motors may not be able to go as fast as one motor due to drag, and they may not be able to travel as many miles.

Outboard vs. Inboard: Does Size Matter

Outboard vs. Inboard_ Does Size Matter

In most cases, the size of your boat will dictate the size of the motor you need. For example, a 17-foot boat will usually need an outboard motor with a shaft length of 20-25 inches.

Some exceptions to this rule exist. If you’re using your boat for fishing or other low-speed activities, you may be able to get away with a smaller motor. Longer journeys or high speeds may necessitate an even more powerful motor, however.

In general, outboard motors are more versatile than inboard motors. They’re perfect for small to medium-sized boats and can be used for a variety of activities. Plus, they’re relatively easy to install and maintain.

Inboard motors are best suited for larger boats. They’re usually less powerful than outboard motors and can provide a smoother ride. However, they’re also more expensive and require more maintenance.

Boat Horsepower-To-Weight Ratio

The size of the motor you’ll need for your 17-foot boat will depend on the weight of your boat and the desired speed. A good rule of thumb is to have 20 to 40 pounds of weight per 1 horsepower. This means that a 40 horsepower motor should be able to move a boat that weighs between 1,000 and 1,600 pounds.

Number of People Onboard Influence Size Of Motor

The number of people who will be on board your boat will have an influence on the size of motor you need. If you plan on having a lot of people on your boat, you will need a larger motor. If you only plan on having a few people on your boat, you can get away with a smaller motor.

Here are some things to keep in mind when deciding how many people will be on your boat:

  • The more people you have on your boat, the longer your boat will be in the water. This means that you will need a larger motor to power your boat.
  • More people you have, the louder your boat will be. This is because the engine will have to work harder to move the boat through the water.
  • The more versatile your boat, the more people you can carry. This is because you will be able to switch to sails if need to be, to go faster and farther.
  • The more people you have on your boat, the fewer miles per hour you will be able to go. This is because the boat needs more power to displace more water.
  • The more people you have on your boat, the lower your speed will be. This is because the boat will be heavier and will not be able to move as fast through the water.

Does Insurance Cover Bigger Motor Then It Is Recommend?

No, insurance companies will not cover a bigger motor than what is recommended for a 17 foot boat. They may cover damages caused by the bigger motor, but not the motor itself. 

  • The size of the motor should be based on the size and weight of the boat. 
  • A 17 foot boat should have a motor that is no bigger than 30-40 horsepower. 
  • The weight of the boat should be considered when deciding on the size of the motor. 
  • A heavier boat will need a bigger motor to be able to move it.

In fact, if you were to put a bigger motor on your boat than what is recommended, your insurance company could drop you from their coverage.

In conclusion, the size of the motor you need for a 17 foot boat depends on a variety of factors. The biggest factor is the weight of the boat, as a heavier boat will need a bigger motor to move it. Other factors include the type of boat, how you plan to use the boat, and the water conditions you’ll be operating in.

The maximum horsepower for the boat, the octane of the fuel, the mph, and the boat capacity all play a role in deciding what size motor you need. Versatile motorboats are a good choice for a fishing trip or the long run because they offer a variety of features and can be used for different purposes.

So, to sum it up, the size of motor you need for a 17 foot boat depends on the weight of the boat, the type of boat, and the type of water you’ll be using it in. If you’re unsure of what size motor to get, it’s always best to consult with a professional.

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  • 17 Ft Aluminum Boat

17 foot motorboat

17 Ft Aluminum Boat Boats for sale

1-15 of 226

1999 Horizon 17

1999 Horizon 17

Sunset, Louisiana

Make Horizon

Category Aluminum Fish Boats

Posted Over 1 Month

New motor in 2018. Boat and trailer were repainted and outfitted with updated gear. Low hours on the motor, the trailer is in good shape with newer tires. Normal wear and tear on the hull but there are no major dents in the aluminum. Stock #244047 17' powered by a 2018 50HP Tohatsu 4-stroke engine, updated trolling motor, onboard battery chargers! Located in Sunset Louisiana, this is a 1999 Horizon Aluminium 17ft boat with a 2018 four-stroke Tohatsu 50hp engine with very low hours. Throttle control and stick steering are operated at the forward seat giving you a clear view of what's ahead to steer clear of those stumps. The boat was refurbished with all updated carpet and re-painted, along with the trailer. Nicely equipped with a Minn Kota Edge trolling motor and a Humminbird Piranha fishfinder with an updated transponder. Call me today to view this boat or make an offer. Reason for selling is not using enough.

17ft V haul aluminum boat

17ft V haul aluminum boat

Riverview, Florida

Boat is in great condition motor runs but needs carburetor work has Bimini top 3 life jackets call ask for Homer for more information 1250 obo

17ft aluminum skiff fishing boat

17ft aluminum skiff fishing boat

Maringouin, Louisiana

17ft aluminum skiff. With a 40 mariner and 30 lb thrust trolling motor and 2" pipe trailer! Runs great and ready for fishing! Asking $2000! Call or text 225-505-9040 or 225-718-5583

17 FT - GRUMMAN ALUMINUM FISHING BOAT. NICE.

17 FT - GRUMMAN ALUMINUM FISHING BOAT. NICE.

Dresden, New York

Make GRUMMAN

Model SPORT FISHING

Category Sport Fishing Boats

Length 17.0

1989 - GRUMMAN ALUMINUM FISHING BOAT - V-BOTTOM - ITS A 1989 PACKAGE SET-UP ITS ALL 1989 - GALVIZED TRAILER - GOOD TIRES AND BEARIND - LIGHTS WORK FINE - ALL GOOD CONDITION - --- 50 HORSE - FORCE (CHRYSLER) - SINGLE CARB 2-CYLINDER - RUNS PERFECT - JUST HAD LOWER UNIT ALL DONE - IMPELLER ASSEMBLY - UPPER AND LOWER SEALS - NEWER BATTERY - 2-TANKS(CLEAN) - ELECTRIC-CHOKE ON KEY - STARTS EASY - RUNS SUPER - GARAGE KEPT ALL ITS LIFE - UNDER NEATH THE BOAT IS CLEAN - VERY TIGHT - THE SIDES HAVE A COUPLE SCRATCHES - INTERIOR IS PRETTY MUCH MINT - CONTROLS ALL WORK FINE - NEW FACTORY BILGE PUMP - DUAL-LIVE WELLS(BIG-ONES) FRONT AND REAR - FRONT TROLLER MOTOR - CARPETING IS TIGHT AND FIRM - NICE LOOKING BOAT IN PERSON - SWEET SET-UP IF U KNOW WHAT YOUR LOOKING AT - FRONT LIGHT DOES NOT WORK - FLICKERS A LITTLE - REAR LIGHT GOOD - WITH A DEPTH FINDER - WORKS FINE - NICE LOOKING BOAT IN THE WATER - HAS A RIVER BOAT LOOOK TO IT - CENTER IS WIDE - AROUND 70 INCH - ILL DOUBLE CHECK - EMAIL WITH ANY OTHER SERIOUS INTEREST - SWEET FISHING BOAT.

17 FT - GRUMMAN ALUMINUM FISHING BOAT. NICE.

16ft aluminum river boat

Madison, Georgia

I have a 16'9 aluminum polar kraft river boat for sale. It has a solid aluminum hull (no rivets) and a full 48in deck. Flooring, carpet, seats, trailer running boards, trl tires, and trl lights plus wiring were all replaced back in February.And I had engine impeller replaced in March during its yearly check up at the mech. It is powered by a 40hp Mercury engine. It has a live well (new aerator), radio, new bilge pump, new nav lights, trolling motor, depth/fish finder, 3 life vests, fire extinguisher, and throw cushion. I will consider trades of equal value. $3000 OBO. Thank you for your time my name is Jeremy. You can reach me at 7zero6 two5five one17seven. Text any time please no calls from 10pm to 6am.

16ft aluminum river boat

1998 Xpress 17 FT

Request Price

Hattiesburg, Mississippi

Make Xpress

Model 17 FT

Category Aluminum Fishing Boats

1998 Xpress 17 FT 1998 XPRESS 17 FT GREAT BOAT FOR LESS THAN 5K!!! This Boat will do anything you ask! From pulling a tube with the kids, to an afternoon fishing trip you can do it all for less with a legendary XPRESS BOAT POWDERED BY YAMAHA!!

16 FT ALUMINUM BOAT  17 HORSE MERCURY FLORIDA

16 FT ALUMINUM BOAT 17 HORSE MERCURY FLORIDA

Crystal River, Florida

Make MICROCRAFT

WATER READY

1992 Starcraft SFM 170 17 FT Aluminum boat only

1992 Starcraft SFM 170 17 FT Aluminum boat only

Westminster, Maryland

Make Starcraft

1992 Starcraft SFM 170 17 FT Aluminum boat only, the hull and everything attached to it except the motor, controls and trailer. I am willing to sell the matching trailer and 70HP mercury engine to the winning buyer if interested. The boat is in fair condition and all around a pretty nice set up, 20 gallon inboard gas tank removable live well set up. seats on the bow and 3 pedal stool seats, 2 bilge pumps 1 auto and one controlled by a switch. The seats are no mounted to the floor and will need new hardware to do so, I used it for crabbing and needed the room. Lights are complete and work, horn, anchor, oars, 6 life vest are all included. The boat has storage compartments on both sides port and starboard that will hold most of you staple items. No leaks and the windshield is not cracked. The inside is all carpeted with no soft spots. I have some of the original canvas and Bimini top that are included but is not a complete set. It is rated for 6 people and is pretty fast with the 70HP engine on it, but could go up or down to suit your needs. I plan to keep the motor and matching Starcraft trailer for my next boat but will set as a set for the right price in interested send me a message. The boat has a clear Maryland title and is being sold as is with not implied warranty or guaranties, all sales are final no returns. To purchase this boat you must use the buy it now option and pay a $500 deposit the balance must be paid in cash at time of pick up. Please ask any questions before buying and no I wont ship it or sell it out side of eBay. 100% positive feedback so buy with confidence!

2013 17 ft Grizzly Tracker Camo Aluminum Boat

2013 17 ft Grizzly Tracker Camo Aluminum Boat

Senatobia, Mississippi

Make Bass Tracker

Model Sc1754

2013 17 ft Grizzly Tracker Camo Aluminum Boat Every guys dream hunting boat. One owner that's a boat mechanic. Well maintained. Includes Hull, 50 Mercury, and trailer. Price negotiable. Needs to go asap.

19 ft all Aluminum 5500 lb boat trailer 17

19 ft all Aluminum 5500 lb boat trailer 17

Boiling Springs, South Carolina

I have a 19 ft all Aluminum welded frame 5500 lb boat trailer for a 17-22 ft boat. I have a heavy duty, ALL aluminum, fully adjustable, 20 ft , 5500 lb Bulldog single axle- boat trailer for sale. This trailer is not a bolt together frame, that is partially aluminum.. It is an all aluminum, 5/8 guage, fully adjustable boat trailer, loaded with almost all new thing, from the ball hitch assembly, to new tire/wheels, bunk boards, 14 LED lights, wiring, painted fiberglass fenders, rollers, tow chain, winch assembly and strap, etc. The only non-aluminum parts, are the 5500 lb axle, the NEW 15" wheels or the trailer ball plate. All the rest is aluminum, with a few odds and ends being stainless steel. Even the adjustable bunk brackets are made of 100% aluminum. The trailer's axle housing is totally adjustable, with the frame walls having pre-drilled adjustable markers where the axle can slid forward or backward into 8 positions. Further, the axle is a 5500lb steel axle which is in new condition. This trailer originally had a 22 ft cuddy cabin Larson boat on it. However, the way I have it set up right now is for a 17 ft center console boat. Like I mentioned already, everything is adjustable for both a flats style smaller boat or larger deep v cuddy style boat. The winch assembly slides 3-4 feet in either direction, as well as up and down, and along with the bunk board brackets, forward or backwards. from a flats style to the deep-v style. This trailer also had added new tow chains and ball hitch assembly up front with all new wiring and loaded with LED lighting, included on the rail arms. It has 3 sets of yellow side marker, LED lights on the either side, as well as 8 in the rear for stop, running and turn signals. I also added brand new, non-skidding, yellow Neoprene rollers (5 down the center, 2 on sides, plus bow stop) through-out the trailer and one padded trailer frame rail. All recently brand new. Add the brand new Steel belted 15" trailer wheels on it, and you will see this turn key trailer is a great bargain at $1500.00. I spent in the yellow rollers alone over $250, then add the same amount for all the new LED lights on it,. Add an additional $50 in brackets, $25 more for wiring, $100 + for 2x6x12 carpeted new bunk boards, over $125 in aluminum and stainless steel hardware, and $325 on 15" radial tire / wheels, with two kick-up jacks, and things add up quickly. I had an aluminum welder go through the entire trailer for me and make sure every joint was additionally welded beyond measure for added strength. I won't mention those costs. All is in like new to new condition . I even had the fiberglass fenders factory repainted in the teal color, which includes a two stage sealant, to bring out the look of this beautiful trailer. The side guide rails were even redone for an easier boat guide/ drive on in the water . You won't see two of these out there, especially this clean and new. $1500 OBO call me if interested in it (941) 228-8631

17ft Bass Aluminum Motor Trailer Boat Excellent Condition

17ft Bass Aluminum Motor Trailer Boat Excellent Condition

Euclid, Ohio

1978, 17 ft Aluminum Bass Boat. Enjoy the luxury of comfort while catching fish.

17ft Polar Craft Aluminum boat with ice runners

17ft Polar Craft Aluminum boat with ice runners

Granite City, Illinois

17ft Polar Craft Aluminum boat with ice runners. 1992 Mariner 25HP Motor as new with stainless prop. Motor guide trolling motor - power pedestal and butt seat plus two extra seats. Live well and rod box. ROLCO Trailer with spare Always kept boat in garage - very good condition. Just serviced by dealer - new water pump & gear oil change - it's ready to go! New license -- till 2015. $4000 cash only Granite City pu Please call  - no text please.

1997 War Eagle 17ft Aluminum boat 90hp Johnson TROLLING MOTOR Live Well

1997 War Eagle 17ft Aluminum boat 90hp Johnson TROLLING MOTOR Live Well

Jackson, Mississippi

Make War Eagle

Category Fishing Boats

1997 WAR EAGLE 754 BIG 90HP JOHNSON ENGINELIVE WELLTROLLING MOTORINCLUDES TRAILERRECENT SERVICE INLUDING NEW BILGE PUMP, STATOR, CARB KITS, BATTERY & MORECALL 601-218-1223 FOR MORE INFO OR PRICING! WATCH THE VIDEO IN 720 HIGH DEF! WATCH TO THE END FOR A DEMO ON THE WATER! Just out of service with the Mississippi Dept. of Wildlife, Fisheries & Parks is this 1997 War Eagle 754 aluminum 17ft (approximately) fishing boat. We just did a full service including a new bilge pump, fresh battery, and new carb kits for the engine as well as a new stator. It fires up with a tap of the key & runs perfect plus the oil injection system works perfectly as well so no hassling with having to premix your fuel!

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The BlueCat 17 the perfect boat for near shore fishing

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The bluecat 17 the perfect boat for fishing or family.

Meet the BlueCat 17 - your perfect companion for memorable fishing expeditions and family outings. Sporting a class-leading 7-foot beam, this compact catamaran surprises with an abundance of space and superior stability. Powered by Mercury Racing engines ranging from 90hp to 150hp, it ensures reliable and exhilarating performance without compromising on comfort or safety. Whether you're seeking the thrill of the catch or cherishing quality family time, the BlueCat 17 provides the ideal platform. Enjoy simplicity, versatility, and fun in this small but mighty catamaran.

The BlueCat 17 is hand made with attention to detail

Discover the BlueCat 17, a testament to craftsmanship and attention to detail. All our catamarans are meticulously handcrafted by our quality-focused employees, ensuring every inch reflects our commitment to excellence. The result is not just a boat, but a high-performing vessel that combines agile handling, impressive speed, and dependable stability. Experience the difference of a hand-made catamaran with the BlueCat 17 - where quality engineering meets masterful craftsmanship for superior on-water performance.

The BlueCat 17 takes on the chop with no problems

Experience the captivating prowess of the BlueCat 17 as it effortlessly tackles choppy waters. This small yet mighty catamaran handles rough conditions with ease, gliding smoothly across the surface like a cloud sweeping across the sky. Despite its compact size, it's designed to maintain stability and composure, making every journey comfortable and secure. Enjoy the thrill of the ride without compromise with the BlueCat 17 – your perfect partner for navigating through the slop with grace and speed.

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All boats are available to ship nationwide fob Indiantown, Florida.

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17 foot motorboat

The BlueCat 17

Meet the BlueCat 17 - your perfect companion for memorable fishing expeditions and family outings. Sporting a class-leading 7-foot beam, this compact catamaran surprises with an abundance of space and superior stability.

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Experience the difference of a hand-made catamaran with the BlueCat 17 - where quality engineering meets masterful craftsmanship for superior on-water performance.

17 foot motorboat

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97 Grumman 18ft boat Helix 7 Fishfinder ACC F&R, 2 live wells, 2 coolers,trolley motor with foot control,new Bimini top. Comes with accessories. 97 Shoreline trailer, New hubs, working lights 99...

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Hollis Nevells through a window.

The Mayday Call: How One Death at Sea Transformed a Fishing Fleet

The opioid epidemic has made a dangerous job even more deadly. And when there’s an overdose at sea, fishermen have to take care of one another.

Hollis Nevells aboard the Karen Nicole, a fishing vessel based in Massachusetts whose owner adopted a Narcan training program because of rising opioid overdoses in the industry. Credit... David Guttenfelder for The New York Times

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By C.J. Chivers

C.J. Chivers is a staff writer for the magazine. He reported from fishing ports in Massachusetts, Rhode Island and New Jersey for several months.

  • June 6, 2024

The call from the Atlantic Ocean sounded over VHF radio on a midsummer afternoon. “Mayday, mayday, mayday,” the transmission began, then addressed the nearest U.S. Coast Guard command center. “Sector Delaware Bay, this is the vessel Jersey Pride. Come in.”

Listen to this article, read by James Patrick Cronin

About 40 miles east-southeast of Barnegat Light, N.J., the Jersey Pride, a 116-foot fishing vessel with a distinctive royal blue hull, was towing a harvesting dredge through clam beds 20 fathoms down when its crew found a deckhand unresponsive in a bunk. The captain suspected an overdose. After trying to revive the man, he rushed to the radio. “Yes, Coast Guard, uh, I just tried to wake a guy up and he’s got black blood in his nose,” he said, sounding short of breath on Channel 16, the international hailing and distress frequency for vessels at sea. “I got guys working on him. Come in.”

The seas were gentle, the air hot. In cramped crew quarters in the forepeak, the deckhand, Brian Murphy, was warm but not breathing in a black tee and jeans. He had no discernible pulse. Dark fluid stained his nostrils. A marine welder and father of four, Murphy, 40, had been mostly unemployed for months, spending time caring for his children while his wife worked nights. A few days earlier, while he was on a brief welding gig to repair the Jersey Pride at its dock, the captain groused about being short-handed. Murphy agreed to fill in. Now it was July 20, 2021, the third day of the first commercial fishing trip of his life. Another somber sequence in the opioid epidemic was nearing its end.

“Captain,” a Coast Guard petty officer asked, “is there CPR in progress?”

“Yes, there is,” the captain replied.

About 17 miles to the Jersey Pride’s southeast, the fishing vessel Karen Nicole was hauling back its two scallop dredges and preparing to swing aboard its catch. Through the low rumble of the 78-foot boat’s diesel engine and the high whine of its winches, the mate, Hollis Nevells, listened to the conversation crackling over a wheelhouse radio. Nevells had lost a brother-in-law and about 15 peers to fatal overdoses. When the Jersey Pride’s captain broadcast details of his imperiled deckhand — “His last name is Murphy,” he said — Nevells understood what he heard in human terms. That’s someone’s son or brother, he thought.

Nevells knew the inventory of his own vessel’s trauma kit. It contained bandages, tape, tourniquets, splints, analgesics and balms, but no Narcan, the opioid antidote. Without it, there was little to do beyond hope the Jersey Pride’s captain would announce that the other deckhands successfully revived their co-worker. Only then, Nevells knew, would the Coast Guard send a helicopter.

Murphy remained without vital signs. His pupils, the captain told the Coast Guard, had dilated to “the size of the iris.” The Jersey Pride swung its bow shoreward toward the Manasquan River, where medical examiners would meet the boat at its dock. Another commercial fisherman was gone.

Since the opioid crisis hit the United States in the late 1990s, no community has been spared. First with prescription painkillers, then with heroin after tighter prescription rules pushed people dependent on opioids to underground markets, and more recently with illicitly manufactured fentanyl and its many analogues, the epidemic has killed roughly 800,000 people by overdose since 1999, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. With fatalities averaging more than 80,000 a year for three years running, it is the nation’s leading cause of accidental death.

The death toll includes victims from all walks of life, but multiple studies illuminate how fatalities cluster along occupational lines. A 2022 report by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health noted that employees in fishing, forestry, agriculture and hunting had the highest rates of all industries, closely followed by workers in construction trades. The news affirmed what was visible on these jobs. Federal data had long established that such workers — at risk from falls, equipment mishaps or drowning — were the most likely to die in workplace accidents in the United States. Now opioids stalked their ranks disproportionately, too.

In fishing fleets, the reasons are many and clear. First is the grueling nature of the job. “The fishing industry and the relationship to substance use is the story of pain, mental and physical pain, and the lack of access to support,” says J.J. Bartlett, president and founder of Fishing Partnership Support Services, a nonprofit that provides free safety training to fishing communities in the Northeast and the Mid-Atlantic.

The deck of the Karen Nicole at night piled with scallop shells.

The risk is also rooted in how fishery employment is organized. Crew members on fishing vessels are typically independent contractors paid a fraction of the profit (a “share,” in industry jargon) after each trip. They generally lack benefits or support common to full-time employment on land, including health insurance, paid sick time and access to human-resource departments or unions. Physical conditions factor in, too. Offshore fishing boats tend to operate ceaselessly. Captains divide crew work into long, overlapping watches that offer little sleep and require arduous labor on slick, pitching decks, sometimes in extreme weather. The work can assume an ultramarathon character. When a valuable catch is running, as squid do in summer south of Nantucket, many boats will fill holds or freezers over several days, return to port to offload, then immediately take on food, fuel and ice and head back out, a practice known as “turn and burn” that can leave crews haggard. Stress, pain and injuries are inherent in such circumstances, including common musculoskeletal injuries and, on scallop vessels, an unusual and excruciating affliction known as “the grip” — caused by constant shucking — that can make hands curl and seize up for days. No matter the suffering, deckhands are expected to keep pace. Those who can are rewarded with checks, sometimes large checks, and respect, an intangible more elusive than wealth. Those who can’t are not invited back.

Its hardships notwithstanding, the industry is a reservoir of human drive and ocean-roaming talent, providing good wages and meaningful work to the independent-minded, the rugged, the nomadic and the traditionally inclined, along with immigrants and people with criminal records or powerful allergies to the stultifying confines of office life. On the water, pedigree and background checks mean little. Reputation is all. In this way, the vessels preserve a professional culture as old as human civilization and bring to shore immense amounts of healthful food, for which everyone is paid by the pound, not by the hour.

Taken together, these circumstances pressure deckhands to work through fatigue, ailments and injuries. One means is via stimulants or painkillers, or both, making it no surprise that in the fentanyl era fishing crews suffer rates of fatal overdose up to five times that of the general population. “This is an unaddressed public-health crisis,” Bartlett says, “for workers without a safety net.”

Commercial fishing in the United States also operates in a gap in the legal framework governing other industries running vessels at sea. The federal regulations mandating drug-testing for mariners on vessels in commercial service — including ferries, tugs and cargo ships as well as research and charter boats — exempt all fishing boats except the very largest. Some companies screen anyhow. But with no legal requirement, captains and crews are generally tested only after a serious incident, like a sinking, collision or death on deck. Toxicology tests are also performed on fishermen’s corpses, when the authorities manage to recover them. “We always find out too late,” says Jason D. Neubauer, deputy chief of the Coast Guard’s Office of Investigations & Casualty Analysis. One of Neubauer’s uncles, a lumberjack, was addicted to heroin for decades. “I take this personally every time I see a mariner dying from drugs,” he says, “because I have seen the struggle.”

None of these employment factors are new. Working fishermen have always faced pain, exhaustion and incentives to work through both. (A weeklong trip aboard a scalloper, among the most remunerative fishing jobs, can pay $10,000 or more — a check no deckhand wants to miss.) Heroin, cocaine and amphetamines were common in ports a generation ago. Veteran captains say drug use was much more widespread then, before smaller catch limits and tighter regulations forced the industry to trim fleets and sometimes the size of crews. Contraction, employers say, compelled vessels to hire more selectively, reducing the presence of illicit drugs.

If use is down, potency is up. Much of the increased danger is because of fentanyl, which the Drug Enforcement Administration considers 50 times stronger than heroin. Fentanyl suppresses respiration and can kill quickly, challenging the industry’s spirit of self-reliance. When offshore, laboring between heaving seas and endless sky, fishermen cook for themselves, repair damaged equipment themselves and rely on one another for first aid. Everything depends on a few sets of able hands. Barring calamity, there exists no expectation of further help. The ethos — simultaneously celebrated and unsettling — is largely the same over the horizon off the Atlantic, Pacific and Gulf coasts, in fisheries bringing billions of pounds of seafood to consumers each year. When the severity of an ailment or injury is beyond what crews can manage alone, a baked-in math restricts access to trauma care. Fishing vessels routinely operate eight hours or more from land, putting employees in circumstances utterly different from those of most workers in the United States, where response times for E.M.T.s are measured in minutes. The Coast Guard runs a highly regarded search-and-rescue service, but when a vessel’s location is remote or a storm howling, Coast Guard aircraft might require hours to arrive. Urgency does not eliminate distance and weather. A fentanyl overdose can kill in minutes, a timeline no Coast Guard asset can beat.

As the epidemic has claimed crew member after crew member, the death toll has been behind a push to bring harm-reduction strategies out onto the ocean. Chief among them are efforts to train crews to identify and treat an overdose and a push to saturate fleets with naloxone, the opioid antagonist, commonly administered as a nasal spray under the trade name Narcan, that can reverse overdoses and retrieve a fading patient from a mortal slide. The initiatives have made some inroads. But in a proud industry where names are made on punishing work and high-seas savvy, naloxone distribution has also faced resistance from vessel owners or captains concerned about the message carrying Narcan might send. Where proponents have succeeded, they have done so in part by demonstrating that harm reduction isn’t an abdication of fishermen’s responsibility — but a natural extension of it.

Before venturing into commercial fishing, Brian Murphy endured a run of difficult years. He separated from his wife in 2015 and moved to Florida, where he found, then lost, employment before running low on cash during the pandemic. He returned in late 2020 to his wife’s home in Vineland, reuniting their children with both parents and putting himself within an hour or so of commercial fishing docks along the shore. He hoped to find work welding for the fleet as he co-parented and put his life in order. “He was getting there,” his wife, Christina, says. “All he needed was a job.”

The deckhand position looked like the break he sought. It paid roughly $1,000 for three days at sea. The captain, Rodney Bart, seemed more than accommodating. Though he lived about 70 miles away, he agreed to pick up Murphy before the trip. Murphy told his wife he might put his wages toward a car, which could help him find a land job. Christina had reservations. She had heard stories of captains’ working crews past exhaustion and tolerating drugs on board. But she understood that her husband needed work. The back of his neck bore a small tattoo of the letter M adorned with a crown. “King Murph,” he called himself. He longed for that old stride.

What his family did not know was that the Jersey Pride, a boat that formerly enjoyed an excellent reputation, was in decline. Its hull and bulkheads were thick with rust. Its big gray-bearded captain, Bart, struggled with addiction to opioids and meth. A friend warned Murphy the vessel was “bad news,” says Murphy’s father, Brian Haferl. Murphy took the job anyhow.

On July 17, 2021, the evening before Murphy departed, he stayed up playing Call of Duty with a younger brother, Doug Haferl. Christina worked the night shift at a trucking firm. She returned home in the darkness and gave Brian a bag of bedding and clean clothes. When Bart showed up before dawn, Murphy dipped into the bedroom to say goodbye. Christina shared what cash she had — about $15 — to put toward cigarettes. “I didn’t have much else to give him,” she says. Then her husband left, off to make a check.

For two days Christina wondered how Brian was doing and whether he was getting sleep. I hope that blanket was enough, she thought. On the third day, a friend from a boatyard called. He said that Murphy was unconscious on the boat and that the Coast Guard might be flying out to help. Christina chose hope. “I figured they’d probably get the helicopter out there and revive him,” she says. About a half-hour later, a Coast Guard captain arrived at her home to inform her Brian was dead.

The captain shared what investigators gleaned at the dock: Murphy hurt his back, was pacing back and forth and had been in an argument with another deckhand. He got into a bunk to rest, and was soon found lifeless. “They just said he was acting really weird,” she says. The Coast Guard captain also said a small plastic bag had been found with him that appeared to contain drug residue. Christina was suspicious. Her husband had no money to buy drugs, and though he occasionally used Percocet pills and meth in the past, had not been using since returning home.

The same night, a police officer called Murphy’s father to notify him. Haferl was enraged. He told the officer that someone on the vessel must have given his son drugs and that he was heading to the dock with a rifle. “The guys on that boat better duck,” he said. The officer advised against this. If he caused a disturbance boatside, Haferl recalls him saying, “We’re going to be fishing you out of the river.”

Haferl could not rush to the Jersey Pride anyhow. Fishermen are paid by what they catch. Once medical examiners took custody of Murphy’s body, the vessel slipped back out the inlet to continue clamming. Murphy had boarded the boat with a duffel from home. He was carried off in jeans, socks and a T-shirt. Not even his shoes came back. When the Jersey Pride completed its trip, his family started calling Bart, the captain, seeking answers and Brian’s personal effects. Bart did not return calls. Neither did the owner, Doug Stocker. Eventually, Christina said, the friend from the boatyard dropped off her husband’s wallet and a phone. Both were sealed in plastic bags. Silence draped over the case. “No one was telling anyone anything,” Murphy’s father said.

Stocker, the Jersey Pride’s owner, relieved Bart of his position in fall 2021, then died that December. Bart died in 2023. Murphy’s family learned little beyond the contents of the autopsy report from the Ocean County Medical Examiner’s office. Its toxicology results were definitive. They showed the presence of fentanyl, methamphetamine and the animal tranquilizer xylazine in Murphy’s cardiac blood, leading the examiner to rule his death a result of “acute toxic effects” of three drugs. (Xylazine is another recent adulterant in black-market drug supplies.)

The report also revealed a surprise: Murphy’s blood contained traces of naloxone. Why he died nonetheless raised more unanswered questions. There were possible explanations. The crew may have administered naloxone perimortem, at the moment of death, too late to save his life but in time to show up in his blood. Alternately, the fentanyl may have been too potent for the amount of naloxone on board and failed to revive Murphy at all. A more disturbing possibility, which suggested a potential lapse in training, was that after Murphy received Narcan, Bart opted to let him rest and recover, and either the naloxone wore off or the other drugs proved lethal without intervention.

The last possibility was both maddening to consider and hard to fathom, given Bart’s personal experience with the sorrows of the epidemic. His adult daughter, Maureen, became dependent on prescription painkillers after a hip injury, completed rehab and relapsed fatally in 2018. Wracked with grief, Bart, who in 2017 completed an outpatient detox program for his own addiction, resumed use, one relative said. In March 2018 he overdosed aboard the Jersey Pride while it was alongside an Atlantic City dock. Narcan saved the captain that day. His pain deepened. His son, Rodney Bart Jr., followed him into clamming as a teenager and rose to become a mate on another clamming vessel, the John N. In 2020, about a year before Murphy died, Bart’s son fatally overdosed on fentanyl and heroin while towing a dredge off the Jersey Shore.

A federal wrongful-death lawsuit filed by Rodney Jr.’s family in early 2023 sketched a work force in addiction’s grip. It claimed that for more than six months before Rodney Jr.’s overdose, he complained that “the entire crew including the captain were using heroin during fishing operations”; that the captain supplied heroin to the crew, including to Rodney Jr.; that another crew member almost died by overdose on board in 2019; that Rodney Jr. nearly stepped on a needle on the boat; and that he saw “the captain nodded out” in the wheelhouse several times. Immediately after Rodney Jr.’s death, the suit claimed, the captain discussed with the crew “fabricating a story to the United States Coast Guard that decedent had died at the dock.” That night, the suit claimed, the captain falsely told the authorities that Rodney Jr. suffered a heart attack.

The parties settled early this year for an undisclosed sum. In telephone interviews, an owner of the vessel, John Kelleher, said he had zero tolerance for drug use and was not aware his crew was injecting heroin. After the death, he said, “I fired everybody that was on that boat.” Kelleher’s vessels now carry Narcan, though he was ambivalent about its presence. “It says it’s OK to have a heroin addict on the boat?” he asked. “I don’t want to promote that on the boat. We owe millions of dollars to the bank. You can’t have crews out there to catch clams driving around in circles.”

Hours after Murphy died, the Karen Nicole’s mate, Hollis Nevells, used a satellite phone to call his wife, Stacy Alexander-Nevells, in Fairhaven, Mass. The Karen Nicole is part of a large family-run enterprise in greater New Bedford, the most lucrative fishing port in the United States. Alexander-Nevells, a daughter of the business’s founder, grew up in commercial fishing. She sensed something was wrong. “Is everyone OK?” she asked.

“I just heard someone die on the radio,” Nevells said. “It was so close, so close, and I couldn’t help.”

Hearing strain in his voice, Alexander-Nevells was swept with pain. Her brother Warren Jr., a shore worker in the family business, died of a prescription-opioid overdose in 2009. She lived quietly in that shadow. Thinking of Murphy’s fellow crew members, and of other boats listening as the captain publicly broadcast Murphy’s deathbed symptoms, she felt an inner wall fall. “That was the first time I started processing how far-reaching one death could be, especially a preventable one,” she says. “For days I couldn’t stop thinking about it.”

In a conversation with a girlfriend, her friend mentioned Narcan. Alexander-Nevells knew of the drug, but thought of it as something administered only by emergency medical workers. That was no longer true. In 2018 Massachusetts authorized pharmacies to dispense Narcan without a prescription to opioid users, their families and “persons in a position to assist individuals at risk of experiencing an opioid-related overdose.” The Alexander fleet, employing more than 100 people in a high-risk industry, qualified. (Last year the Food and Drug Administration approved Narcan for over-the-counter sales, removing more barriers to distribution.) Had the Karen Nicole carried naloxone, Alexander-Nevells thought, Murphy might still be alive. Still she balked. She realized she knew almost nothing about the drug. “I didn’t know dose,” she says. “I didn’t know how to use it.”

All around the harbor there were signs of need. For as long as any commercial fisherman could remember, greater New Bedford suffered from widespread substance use. Before recent pockets of shoreline gentrification appeared, some of the city’s former bars, notably the National Club, were the stuff of coastal legend. Older fishermen say there was little in the 1990s like the National during nor’easters and hurricanes, when scores of boats lashed together in port, rain and gales blasted the streets and crews rode out the weather at the bar. Booze flowed. Drugs were easy to find. And fishermen between trips often had wads of cash. “We were basically pirates back then,” one older scalloper says. “The way we lived, the way we fished. It was a free-for-all.” The scalloper, later incarcerated in Maine for heroin possession, says he stopped using opioids before fentanyl tainted the heroin supply. “I got out just in time,” he says. “It’s the only reason I’m still alive.” (His girlfriend’s son, a young fisherman, overdosed fatally the week before; to protect his household’s privacy, he asked that his name be withheld.) Capt. Clint Prindle, who commands the Coast Guard sector in southeastern New England, also recalls the era. As a young officer he was stationed in New Bedford on the cutter Campbell. The tour, he says, “was the only time in my career I was issued puncture-resistant gloves” — a precaution against loose syringes on fishing vessels.

For all these stories, the fishing industry was hardly the sole driver of the city’s underground trade, and drug use there remains widespread independent of the fleet. An investigation by The New Bedford Light, a nonprofit news site, found that one in every 1,250 city residents died of an overdose in 2022, more than twice the rate statewide. (Nationally, about one in 4,070 people died of opioid overdoses in 2022.) The report also found that about one out of eight New Bedford residents had enrolled in drug- or alcohol-addiction treatment since 2012. Such data aligns with the experience of Tyler Miranda, a scallop-vessel captain who grew up in the city. “The people who had money were drug dealers or fishermen,” he says. “When I was young, I knew a few fishermen, but most of my friends were in the other business.” These conditions helped make overdoses part of the local medical routine, prompting the city, with help from organizations like Fishing Partnership, to distribute free Narcan.

The movement has still not been fully embraced. A survey of commercial fishing captains published last year in The American Journal of Industrial Medicine suggested that skepticism about stocking Narcan persisted. Of 61 captains, 10 had undergone naloxone training, and only five said their vessels carried the drug. The survey’s data ended in 2020, and Fishing Partnership says the numbers have risen. Since 2016, the partnership’s opioid-education and Narcan-distribution program has trained about 2,500 people in the industry from Maine to North Carolina, about 80 percent of them in the last three years, says Dan Orchard, the partnership’s executive vice president. But with resistance lingering, Alexander-Nevells was unsure whether she could get Narcan on her family’s fleet. That would depend on her father, Warren J. Alexander.

Alexander is a tall, reserved man with neatly combed white hair who entered commercial fishing in the 1960s at age 13 by packing herring on weekends at Cape May. As a young man he lobstered, potted sea bass and worked on trawlers and clammers before setting out on his own with the purchase of a decades-old wooden schooner. The boat sank near Cape May while returning in a storm; Alexander tells the story of hearing its propeller still turning as he treaded water above the descending hull. Undeterred, he gambled big, having steel clamming vessels built in shipyards in the Gulf of Mexico and bringing them north. By the 1990s he was one of New Jersey’s most successful clam harvesters, and odds were good that any can of clam chowder in the United States contained shellfish scraped from the sea floor by an Alexander dredge. He moved the business to New England in 1993, weathering two more sinkings and a pair of fatal accidents as it continued to grow. In the ensuing years, he left clamming and largely switched to scalloping, and now owns more than 20 steel vessels, which he watches over from a waterfront warehouse, greeting captains and crews with the soft-spoken self-assurance of a man who has seen it all.

His daughter knew him as more than a fleet manager. He was a father who lost his son, Warren Jr., to opioids. He lived the torturous contours of the epidemic firsthand. She pitched her idea with shared loss in mind. Warren listened and ruled. “I’m not going to mandate it,” he said. “But if you can get captains to agree to it, you can give it a try.”

The Fishing Partnership’s program to put naloxone on boats and provide crews with overdose first-aid training began after Debra Kelsey, a community health worker, met a grieving fisherman at an event of the Massachusetts Lobstermen’s Association in 2015. The man’s son fatally overdosed about six months before. “He told me his ex-wife had been instrumental in getting Narcan into the hands of the police in Quincy, where he was from,” she says. Kelsey was intrigued — first by the lifesaving value of naloxone, but also by who was trained and designated to carry it.

She lived with a fisherman. She knew the industry and admired its inviolable code: Out on the ocean, fishing boats rushed to help each other. Whether flooding, fire or medical emergency, they came to one another’s aid, and in many cases were first on the scene. “In a mayday call,” she says, “a fishing vessel will often get there before the Coast Guard.” In the particular conditions of work on the water, fishermen functioned as first responders. Kelsey wondered if this ancient trait could be harnessed to save lives in new ways. Naloxone dispensers felt like a suddenly necessary component in vessel safety kits — just like fire extinguishers and throwable lifesaving rings.

In 2017, in part at her urging, Fishing Partnership introduced overdose education and naloxone distribution into the free first-aid classes it offered to captains and crews. Buoyed by a federal grant to New Bedford, the program expanded in 2019 and found an ally in the Coast Guard, which often hosted the partnership’s training sessions at its stations in fishing ports. Its officers echoed Kelsey’s view that naloxone dispensers had become essential onboard equipment.

Naloxone still faced barriers, often from fishermen themselves. Many captains insisted that they forbade illicit drugs and that carrying naloxone functioned as a hypocritical wink, a suggestion that drugs were allowed. Stigma, too, played a role. “People were like, ‘These fishermen are drunks, they’re addicts, they’re living the wild life,’” Kelsey says. She disagreed — addiction isn’t a moral failure, she’d say, it’s a disease — and pressed her message. Stocking naloxone did not mean condoning drug use. It meant a vessel was more fully aligned with the mariner’s code.

Stigma was not the only obstacle. Fear played a role as well. The Coast Guard, for all its support, is a complicated harm-reduction partner. It operates as both a rescue and law-enforcement agency, which leaves many fishermen with a split-screen perception of the organization — appreciating the former role while bristling at the latter. Worries about inviting police action on a boat already dealing with a crew member down make some captains reluctant to report drug-related medical issues, says Captain Prindle, the service’s sector commander. “Often we’ll get a case where the master of a vessel reports they have a cardiac issue or shortness of breath or anxiety issues,” he says. “They leave out the opioids piece.”

Upon returning to the region in 2021, Prindle began attending the partnership’s Narcan training sessions, at which he assured attendees that if they made a mayday call for an overdose, Coast Guard teams would focus on saving a mariner’s life, not on searching for contraband. His message aligned with the experience of service members who patrol the waters. “I don’t think any of us on this boat, when we have an opioid overdose to deal with, want to arrest anybody,” says Petty Officer Third Class Justus Christopher, who runs a 47-foot motor lifeboat out of Martha’s Vineyard. Christopher recalls a vessel with a deckhand in withdrawal. “We got a call that a guy was afraid for his life, and it was a guy dopesick in his bunk,” he says. Other crew members, seething that the deckhand stopped working for his share, were hazing him. Someone defecated in his hat, Christopher said, and smeared Icy Hot in his bedding. The boarding team removed the man. “It never went through our minds to search the boat for drugs,” Christopher said.

With naloxone now available, converts to harm reduction are becoming plentiful around ports. Nuno Lemos, 50, a deckhand in his eighth year of abstinence, moved to New Bedford from Portugal as a teenager. While in high school he did his first commercial trip, working on a trawler and earning $1,200 in five days. On some boats back then, he said, captains dispensed stimulants and painkillers as performance enhancers. His use grew heavy. Between fishing trips, he smoked crack for days, then snorted heroin to come down. “Chasing the dragon,” he says. The habit consumed his income, so he supplemented wages by pinching cash from fellow deckhands’ wallets and hiding fish and scallops under ice below deck, then retrieving the stolen product at the dock for black-market wholesalers. His professional reputation plummeted. He spiraled at home too. Lemos had a son with a woman also battling addiction. In no condition to raise their child, they both lost access to the boy. Her parents took over his care. “I was selfish and self-centered,” he says. “The drugs ran the show.”

In 2016, Lemos hit bottom. He walked off a fishing boat that was laid up in Provincetown during a storm and binge-drank for hours, then burglarized a home to fund a bus ride back to New Bedford. That afternoon he took refuge in the unfinished basement of a bakery and injected what he thought was heroin. He collapsed. His mother, who rented an apartment upstairs, summoned paramedics, who reversed the overdose with naloxone. Lemos shrugged off his brush with death. “I was in the hospital for a few hours, and I got high right after,” he says. But the experience left its impression. He got his hands on Narcan and kept two other people alive. One was a fisherman named Mario, the other “a kid on Rivet Street,” he says, whom he barely knew. Later that year, ashamed and worried he would die without knowing his son, he checked into rehab. Months later he resumed work, first hanging drywall, then back on scalloper decks. As his sobriety lasted, he reunited with his son. His praise of naloxone now borders on liturgy. “Narcan is a God-given thing that should be part of everybody’s training, especially in the business that I am in,” he says. “It’s a pivotal tool of survival that should be on every boat.”

Another fisherman, Justin Souza, 38, started fishing at age 20 and soon was taking opioid pills to manage pain. He moved to heroin when OxyContin became scarce on the streets. When fentanyl entered underground markets, he says, it started killing his friends, ultimately claiming about 20 people he knew, a half-dozen of them fishermen. His first encounter with naloxone was jarringly personal: He was in an apartment with a friend who slipped into unconsciousness and was gargling for breath. “My buddy was dying, and I had a bag of drugs,” he said. “It was either call 911 or my buddy is dead. So I called 911, hid the stuff, and they came and hit him with Narcan.” The man survived. Souza was arrested on an unrelated possession charge in 2017. In jail he changed course. “I cried out to Jesus,” he said, “and he showed up.”

Upon release he entered treatment and has been abstinent since, for which he credits God. Reliable again, Souza was hired by Tyler Miranda, captain of the scallop vessel Mirage, who promoted him to engineer, the crew member responsible for maintaining the boat’s winches and power plant. The Mirage’s crew is a testament to the power of redemption. Once addicted to opioids himself, Miranda has abstained since 2017. He became captain two years into his sobriety, and stocked naloxone onboard shortly after.

Eight days after Brian Murphy died, Kelsey and a co-worker showed up at the Ocean Wave, one of Alexander’s scallopers, to train its crew. The instructors mixed demonstrations on how to administer Narcan — one spray into one nostril, the second into the other — with assurances that the drug was harmless if used on someone suffering a condition other than overdose. The training carried another message, which was not intuitive: Merely administering Narcan was not enough. Multiple dispensers were sometimes required to restore a patient’s breathing, and this was true even if a patient resumed seemingly normal respiration. If the opioids were particularly potent, a patient might backslide as the antagonist wore off. Patients in respiratory distress also often suffered “polysubstance overdoses,” like fentanyl mixed with other drugs, including cocaine, amphetamines or xylazine. Alcohol might be involved, too. With so many variables, anyone revived with naloxone should be rushed to professional care. In an overdose at sea, they said, a victim’s peers should make a mayday call, so the Coast Guard could hurry the patient to a hospital.

After the partnership trained two more Alexander crews, Warren heard positive feedback from his captains. He issued his judgment. “Now it’s mandatory,” he said. Within weeks of the Jersey Pride’s mayday call, Narcan distribution and training became permanent elements of the company’s operation. Alexander-Nevells credits Murphy. He spent about 72 hours as a commercial fisherman, died on the job and left a legacy. “He changed my dad’s fleet,” she says. “I know for a fact that without Brian Murphy, this program doesn’t exist.”

In New Jersey, where Murphy’s family suffered the agonies of sudden, unexpected loss, followed by the humiliation of being ghosted by those who knew what happened to him aboard the Jersey Pride, the changes to the Alexander fleet came as welcome news. His brother, Doug Haferl, recalls his sibling with warmth and gratitude. Their parents divorced when the kids were young, and their father worked long hours as a crane operator. Brian assumed the role of father figure. “He took me and my brother Tom under his wing,” he says. The thought that Brian’s death helped put naloxone on boats and might one day save a life, he says, “is about the best thing I could hope for.”

Deckhands and captains come and go. Naloxone dispensers expire. To keep the fleet current, Alexander-Nevells booked refresher training throughout 2023 and into 2024. At one class, Kelsey met the Karen Nicole’s captain and five-person crew. The group gathered in the galley. Everyone present had lost friends. Kelsey recited symptoms. “If someone overdoses,” she said, “they will make a noise — ”

“It’s a gargle,” said Myles Jones, a deckhand. “I know what it is.”

He stood by a freezer, a compact, muscular man in a white sleeveless tee. “I’ve lost a son,” he said. The room fell still.

“I’m sorry,” Kelsey said. She stepped across the galley and wrapped him in a hug. Jones managed a pained smile. “I lost an uncle, too,” he said.

Kelsey continued the class, then examined the Narcan aboard to ensure it had not expired. The boat headed to sea.

In the wheelhouse, the mate, Hollis Nevells, said that Narcan fit a mentality fishing jobs require. He shared a story of a drunk fisherman who crashed a house party years ago in his hometown on Deer Isle, Maine. To prevent him from driving his pickup truck, other guests took his keys and stashed them atop a refrigerator. Furious, the man produced a pistol, pointed it at Nevells’s face and demanded the keys’ return. Thus persuaded, Nevells retrieved them. The man drove away only to call a short while later, upset. His truck was stuck in mud. He wanted help. Several fishermen drove to him, separated him from the pistol and beat the truck with baseball bats until it was totaled. “Island justice,” Nevells said. In his view, carrying Narcan matched this rough, self-help spirit: On the ocean, crews needed to solve problems themselves, and with Narcan came the power to save a life. Nevells had lost many peers to overdoses, among them the man who leveled the pistol at his face. He remembered feeling helpless as the Jersey Pride broadcast graphic descriptions at the hour of Murphy’s death. He did not want to feel that way again.

The captain, Duane Natale, agreed. He had seen firsthand how delaying death bought time for a rescue. Scallopers tow massive steel dredges that cut furrows through the ocean bottom and snatch scallops along the way. By winch and boom, the dredges are periodically lifted above deck to shake out catch, then lowered again. The procedure is exceptionally dangerous. A swinging dredge, about 15 feet wide and weighing more than a ton, can crush a man in one sickening crunch. In the 1990s, Natale saw a falling dredge shear off a deckhand’s extended right arm. A makeshift tourniquet tightened around the stump kept the man alive until a helicopter lifted him away. Had they not been trained, the deckhand would have died. Natale saw a similar role for Narcan: a means to stop a fatality and let the Coast Guard do its work. “I like it a lot,” he said. “Last thing I want on my conscience is someone dying on my boat.”

In water 45 fathoms deep the boat steamed at 4.8 knots, towing dredges through sandy muck while the crew sweated through an incessant loop. From a hydraulic control station at the wheelhouse’s aft end, Nevells or Natale periodically hoisted the dredges and shook out tons of scallops, which slid out onto the steel deck in rumbling cascades of pink-and-white shells. Working fast, Hollis and the deckhands shoveled the catch into baskets and hustled it to sheltered cutting stations, where with stainless-steel knives they separated each scallop’s adductor muscle — the portion that makes its way to seafood cases and restaurant plates — from its gob of guts. Hands worked fast, flicking adductors into buckets and guts down chutes that plopped them onto greenish water beside the hull. Large sharks swam lazy circles alongside, turning to flash pale undersides while inhaling easy meals. Music thumped and blared: metal one hour, techno the next. When enough buckets were full of meat and rinsed in saltwater, two deckhands transferred the glistening, ivory-colored catch into roughly 50-pound cloth sacks, handed them down a hatch into the cool fish-hold and buried them beneath ice. Everyone else kept shucking.

The deckhands worked in staggered pairs: 11 hours of shoveling and shucking followed by four hours to shower, eat, sleep and bandage hands, then back on deck for 11 more hours. It continued for days. Daylight became dusk; dusk became night; night became dawn. Sea states changed. Fog and mist soaked the crew and shrouded the vessel, then lifted, revealing other boats on the horizon doing the same thing. The work never stopped. As exhaustion set in, people swayed where they stood, still hauling heavy baskets and shucking. To stay awake they downed coffee and Red Bull, smoked cigarettes and spoke little. One man wore a T-shirt stenciled with a solitary word. It read as both a personal statement and command to everyone else: Grind. Early on the fifth day, the Karen Nicole reached its 12,000-pound federal trip limit. Natale turned the boat toward New Bedford, almost a 24-hour steam away, and cooked everyone a rib-eye steak. The crew showered, ate and slept a few hours, then woke to scrub the boat. On shore two days later, each deckhand received his share: $9,090.61.

Within a year of its mayday call, the Jersey Pride entered a transformation. After the death in 2021 of the vessel’s owner, Doug Stocker, the boat passed to the family of his brother, Clint. A recently retired detective sergeant from the Middle Township Police Department, Clint Stocker was not affiliated with the Jersey Pride when Rodney Bart was its captain, and he knew little of what happened to Murphy, whom he never met. His view on opioid use was clear. “I tolerate none of that,” he says. He also needed no introduction to Narcan, having administered it as a police officer. The boat carries dispensers, he says, “just in case.”

In the midnight blackness this spring after the Jersey Pride returned to port, the vessel’s mate and deckhands described a job-site turnaround. The mate, Justin Puglisi, joined the crew about two months after Murphy’s death. His personal history in commercial fishing began with a loss that resonated through the industry: His father was taken by the sea with the vessel Beth Dee Bob, one of four clam boats that went to the bottom over 13 days in 1999, killing 10 fishermen. As a teenager Puglisi claimed his place in the surviving fleet. The Jersey Pride, he said, was in rough shape when he signed on. The bunk where Murphy overdosed remained unoccupied, the subject of vague stories about a deckhand’s death. Rodney Bart, still the captain, was using fentanyl onboard. “It was blatant,” Puglisi said. “He was leaving empty bags in the wheelhouse.” Two deckhands were heavy users, too. One wandered the boat with a syringe behind his ear. Puglisi had slipped into addiction himself. He was 32, had been using opioids for 15 years and was regularly buying and snorting fentanyl and crystal meth, which he bought in bulk. “I started with pills like everyone else, then switched to the cheaper stuff,” he said.

Bart was fired in fall 2021. But it was after Clint Stocker’s family took over that the operation markedly changed. Clint and his son Craig, who managed the boat’s maintenance, hired new crew members, invested in new electronics and implemented a schedule that gave crew members a week off work after two weeks onboard. They replaced the outriggers and eventually had the boat’s twin diesel engines rebuilt. Puglisi stood at a wheelhouse window. Around him were signs of attentive upkeep: new hoses, valves and a hydraulic pump; fresh upholstery on the wheelhouse bench; a new computer monitor connected to a satellite navigation system. The owners planned to repaint the boat, Puglisi said, but focused on more important maintenance first. “They put their money where it matters,” he said.

The overhaul was more than mechanical. In summer 2022, Puglisi fell asleep in the galley after getting high. When the Stockers heard, they helped find him a bed at rehab for six weeks, then gave him time to attend 90 Narcotics Anonymous meetings in 90 days. “They were like, ‘Go, and your job will be here when you get back,’” he said. When he returned, they put him straight to work. “It was all business,” Puglisi said. He rolled up his left sleeve to reveal a forearm tattoo — “One day at a time,” it read — and described the Jersey Pride as a good boat and fine workplace, unlike when Murphy was invited aboard. “I’ve worked for a lot of owners,” he said, “and this is the best boat I have been on. They take care of their crew.”

It was 1 a.m. A cold April wind blew hard from the northeast. Below Puglisi, three deckhands labored methodically under spotlights to offload catch. One, Bill Lapworth, was a former opioid user also in recovery now. His story matched countless others: He started with pills for pain relief, switched to heroin when the pills became harder to find and almost died when fentanyl poisoned the supply. He was revived by Narcan twice: first by E.M.T.s in an apartment, then by a friend as he slumped near death in a pickup truck. His friend had picked up free Narcan through a community handout program. Smoking a cigarette in the gusts as a crane swung metal cages of ocean quahogs overhead, Lapworth flashed the mischievous grin of a man pulled from the grave not once but twice, then offered a three-word endorsement of the little plastic dispensers to which he owed his life: “I got saved.”

Read by James Patrick Cronin

Audio produced by Elena Hecht

Narration produced by Anna Diamond

Engineered by Quinton Kamara

C.J. Chivers is a staff writer for the magazine and the author of two books, including “The Fighters: Americans in Combat in Afghanistan and Iraq.” He won the Pulitzer Prize for feature writing in 2017 for a profile of a former Marine with PTSD. David Guttenfelder is a photojournalist focusing on geopolitical conflict and conservation.

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    Take home a piece of engineering genius: the 175 Sportfish. This stylishly-polished model delivers a vast array of fishing features, including a 94-quart removable cooler/seat with backrest, extensive bow casting platform with separate storage area, large insulated fish box, aerated live well, plenty of seating and rod holders…all in an easily trailerable package.

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  13. 1852MT AURA 17' Jon Fishing & Hunting Boat

    Base Price, $1500.0 down, 8.49%APR for 15 years. Built tough to handle it all, the L1852 MT Aura Jon is a spacious workhorse with incredible versatility. At 17' 9" long and 6' 3" wide, the riveted aluminum Lowe® L1852MT Aura Jon is wide-open for possibilities, whether that's fishing, hunting, or working. A large raised front deck with storage ...

  14. What Size Motor Do I Need For A 17 Foot Boat? (How to Know!)

    The size of the motor will be determined by the size and weight of the boat. The max horsepower for a 17 foot boat is 300 hp. You want to make sure that the motor is not too big for the boat. If it is too big, it can be bad for the boat and can cause damage. Most 17 foot boats can hold up to a 115 hp motor.

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  16. 17 Ft Aluminum Boat Boats for sale

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  17. 13

    East Coast Location - Maryland - 17 ft. Pre-Owned: Chris Craft. $32,250.00. Local Pickup. 29 watching. 1975 Fiberform 17' Bowrider & Trailer - Engine Runs - Arizona. Pre-Owned: Fiberform. $10.00. 1 bid Ending Thursday at 1:00PM PDT 4d 2h Local Pickup. New Listing 1973 Steury Center Console Boat Model. Pre-Owned: Steury.

  18. The BlueCat 17 the perfect boat for near shore fishing

    The BlueCat 17 the perfect boat for fishing or family Meet the BlueCat 17 - your perfect companion for memorable fishing expeditions and family outings. Sporting a class-leading 7-foot beam, this compact catamaran surprises with an abundance of space and superior stability. Powered by Mercury Racing engines ranging fro

  19. Twin Vee 17 Classic boats for sale

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  20. Best Boat Brands

    Boston Whaler is unquestionably among the best-loved boat brands on the water today. Photo by Boston Whaler. 2. Boston Whaler. Boston Whaler makes fishing and luxury boats from 13' to 42' in 28 different models (as of August 2023), in all. For many years, Boston Whaler boats have been celebrated as "unsinkable".

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  22. Houseboat Docked at PRIVATE TROPICAL ISLAND with 17-ft Motorboat

    Houseboat Docked at PRIVATE TROPICAL ISLAND with 17-ft Motorboat + Kayaks! is located in Florida Keys. Houseboat Docked at PRIVATE TROPICAL ISLAND with 17-ft Motorboat + Kayaks! provides accommodation, featuring Air Conditioner, Parking, Pet Friendly, among other amenities.

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  24. 97 Grumman 18' boat,

    97 Grumman 18ft boat Helix 7 Fishfinder ACC F&R, 2 live wells, 2 coolers,trolley motor with foot control,new Bimini top. Comes with accessories. 97 Shoreline trailer, New hubs, working lights 99... CL. st louis > for sale by owner > boats. post; account; favorites. hidden. CL. st louis > boats - by owner ... Posted 2024-06-17 18:12 ...

  25. How a Death From Fentanyl Transformed a Fishing Fleet

    About 40 miles east-southeast of Barnegat Light, N.J., the Jersey Pride, a 116-foot fishing vessel with a distinctive royal blue hull, was towing a harvesting dredge through clam beds 20 fathoms ...

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