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My Life in the Bush of Ghosts

Using found sounds and trance-like rhythms, Byrne and Eno stumbled onto the future. This groundbreaking work anticipated the creative/technological innovations of contemporary electronic dance music, world music, even hip-hop. Re-mastered, re-sequenced version includes seven previously unreleased tracks.

When the David Byrne / Brian Eno collaboration My Life in the Bush of Ghosts was first released in 1981, Rolling Stone called it “an undeniably awesome feat of tape editing and rhythmic ingenuity.” It was widely considered a watershed record for future genres from world music to electronica, and almost 25 years later, the influence of My Life in the Bush of Ghosts is evident in music ranging from The Bomb Squad’s productions for Public Enemy to Moby, Kruder and Dorfmeister, and Goldie. Nonesuch reissued the album—remixed, remastered, and with seven bonus tracks—on its 25th anniversary, in 2006.

In keeping with the original spirit of the album, and in line with Creative Commons licenses, all the multitracks from two of the songs on the album will be available for download at bush-of-ghosts.com . Users will be able to remix the tracks and upload to the site, listen, and rate others remixes and upload videos they have made themselves. The site will also feature archival press from the original album release, essays, photos from the original sessions, polaroids taken by David Byrne and a video made by Bruce Conner for the song "Mea Culpa" which is also included on the CD itself.

My Life in the Bush of Ghosts is inspired by Byrne’s and Eno’s shared love of African pop, and their particular fascination with the music of 1970s West Africa. In addition to playing by Byrne and Eno, the album incorporates a variety of “found” voices: radio talk-show hosts, Lebanese mountain singers, preachers, exorcism ceremonies, Muslim chanting, and Egyptian pop, among others. My Life in the Bush of Ghosts also includes the contributions of eleven other musicians, including Bill Laswell, Tim Wright, David van Tieghem, and the Talking Heads’ Chris Frantz.

Byrne’s and Eno’s explanations of My Life in the Bush of Ghosts could easily be descriptions of records released two decades later and considered groundbreaking for theirtime. Eno says, “It's almost collage music, like grafting a piece of one culture onto a piece of another onto a piece of another, and trying to make them work as a coherent musical idea, and also trying to make something you can dance to.”

Byrne further elucidates the recording process: “At that time there were no samplers, so the found vocals were inserted into the music by trial and error. We’d have two tape machines playing simultaneously, one containing the track and the other the vocal and, if the gods willed, which they often seemed to, there would be a serendipity, the vocal and the track would at least seem to feel like they belonged together, and it would be a ‘take.’ It was all ‘played” and very seat-of-the-pants. There was none of the incremental tweaking and time-correcting that is possible with modern samplers and computers, so throwing the vocals against the tracks was in our case almost a performance.”

PRODUCTION CREDITS All songs originally recorded 1979-1980 Produced By Brian Eno and David Byrne Studios: RPM, New York, NY, August 4 & 16, 1979; Engineer: Neal Teeman Assistant Engineer: Hugh Dwyer Blue Rock, New York, NY, September 5, 1979; Engineer: Eddie Korvin Assistant Engineer: Michael Ewasko Eldorado, Los Angeles, CA, February & March 1980; Engineer: Dave Jerden Assistant Engineer: George Sloane Different Fur, San Francisco, CA, April 1980; Engineer: Stacy Baird Assistant Engineers: Don Mack, Howard Johnston Sigma, New York, NY, October 1980; Engineer: John Potoker Mastered by Greg Calbi at Sterling Sound, New York, NY, April 28, 2005

All songs written by Brian Eno / David Byrne, except track 3 by Brian Eno / David Byrne / Busta Jones

Title from the book My Life in the Bush of Ghosts by Amos Tutuola (Grove Press) Reissue design by Peter Buchanan-Smith; original package design by Peter Saville Booklet cover image: still from a video by Brian Eno

This is available from Nonesuch in the US and Canada only

MUSICIANS Brian Eno and David Byrne, guitars, basses, synthesizers, drums, percussions, found objects

John Cooksey, drums (4) Chris Frantz, drums (3) Dennis Keeley, bodhran, (2) Mingo Lewis, bata, sticks (5, 8) Prairie Prince, can, bass drum (5, 8) Jose Rossy, congas, agong-gong (7) Steve Scales, congas, metals (4) David van Tieghem, drums, percussion (1, 3) Busta Jones, bass (3) Bill Laswell, bass (1) Tim Wright, click bass (1) Rooks on track 4 courtesy April Potts, Eglingham Hall

bush of ghosts remix

My Life in the Bush of Ghosts by Brian Eno + David Byrne

bush of ghosts remix

Track Listing

  • 1 America Is Waiting 3:36
  • 10 Come with Us 2:38
  • 11 Mountain of Needles 2:35
  • 12 Pitch to Voltage 2:38
  • 13 Two Against Three 1:56
  • 14 Vocal Outtakes 0:36
  • 15 New Feet 2:25
  • 16 Defiant 3:41
  • 17 Number 8 Mix 3:31
  • 18 Solo Guitar with Tin Foil 2:56
  • 2 Mea Culpa 4:57
  • 3 Regiment 4:10
  • 4 Help Me Somebody 4:18
  • 5 The Jezebel Spirit 4:55
  • 6 Very, Very Hungry 3:20
  • 7 Moonlight in Glory 4:30
  • 8 The Carrier 4:19
  • 9 A Secret Life 2:30

News & Reviews

bush of ghosts remix

"When I interviewed David Byrne in November, I enjoyed it so much that when the interview was over, I asked if he'd consider returning before Christmas to play some of his favorite Christmas recordings," Terry Gross, host of NPR's Fresh Air , says on today's show. "I am very grateful that he said yes ... I consider David Byrne's return to our show a great Christmas gift for all of us." Byrne offers a Christmas playlist with his own seasonally appropriate song and others by Gaby Moreno, The Pogues and Kirsty MacColl, James Brown, Prince, Paul Simon, The Staples Singers, Neko Case, and more. You can hear their conversation and the playlist here.

bush of ghosts remix

David Byrne is on NPR’s Fresh Air to talk with host Terry Gross about Talking Heads—whose 1984 concert film Stop Making Sense is in theaters now—and his own evolution, from early musical influences to overcoming setbacks, leading him to wonder what allows people to persevere. "Why is it that people don't give up? That's a real puzzle to me," he says. "I just thought, 'No, I love this. I'm going to keep doing it myself … because I enjoy it.’ So I kept going.” You can hear it here.

About This Album

More from david byrne , fatboy slim.

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My Life in the Bush of Ghosts

Image may contain Graphics Art Text Advertisement Poster Purple Furniture and Tabletop

By Chris Dahlen

Rock / Electronic

March 23, 2006

As David Byrne describes in his liner notes, My Life in the Bush of Ghosts placed its bets on serendipity: "It is assumed that I write lyrics (and the accompanying music) for songs because I have something I need to 'express.'," he writes. "I find that more often, on the contrary, it is the music and the lyric that trigger the emotion within me rather than the other way around." Maybe because it's so obviously the product of trial-and-error experimentation, Bush of Ghosts sounded like a quirky side project on its release in 1981; heck, it didn't even have any "songs." But today, Nonesuch has repackaged it as a near-masterpiece, a milestone of sampled music, and a peace summit in the continual West-meets-rest struggle. So we're supposed to see Bush of Ghosts as a tick on the timeline of important transgressive records.

It mostly holds up to that scrutiny. An album that's built on serendipity-- on Brian Eno fooling around with a new type of drum machine, on syncing the hook in a tape loop to a chorus, on finding the right horrors on the radio-- can't score 100%. But even if you cut it some slack, crucial parts of the album don't sound as intriguing today as they once did-- namely, all of the voices.

The sampled speech from various, mainly religious, sources ties the album into a long and prestigious history of artists who used found sound, which David Toop capably outlines in the liner notes. It's still the secret sauce that provokes a reaction from the listener. But what reaction you have lies outside of Byrne's, Eno's, or your control. On the first half, where the voices are least chopped up, it's difficult to divorce them from their origins. A couple of tracks read as satire-- "America Is Waiting" sounds like Negativland with a way better rhythm section-- and others as kitsch. "Help Me Somebody" pulls a neat trick by turning a preacher into an r&b; singer, but the exorcist on "The Jezebel Spirit" doesn't raise as many hairs on the back of my neck now that taping a crazy evangelist has become the art music equivalent of broadcasting crank phone calls. We can't just hear them for their sound or cadences without digging into the meanings, and not everyone will find the meanings profound.

On the other hand, the rhythm tracks still kick ass 10 ways to Sunday, thanks both to the fly-by apperances of Bill Laswell, Chris Frantz, Prairie Prince, and a half dozen others, and to the inspired messing about of Eno and Byrne as they turned boxes and food tins into percussion. Tape loops are funkier than laptops, and the modern ear is so aware of the digital "noodging" of a sample to a beat that the refreshingly knocked-together arrangements of Bush of Ghosts are a vast improvement. At one stage of the project, they dreamed about documenting the music of a fake foreign culture. They largely pulled it off, and you can tell a lot about this far-off place from its music: It's a futuristic yet tribal town made of resonant sheets of metal and amplified plastic containers, that the populace has to bang constantly in perfect time to make the traffic move, and the stoves heat up, and the lights flicker on at night, and to coax mismatched couples into making love and breeding new percussionists.

The seven bonus tracks will provoke more arguments than they settle. The setlist of Bush of Ghosts has changed several times over the years, and the diehard fans will still have to swap left-out cuts that aren't resurrected here; most famously, "Qu'ran", an apparently sacreligious recording of Koran verses set to music, doesn't get anywhere near this reissue. The songs that are here include a few that sound almost finished, including "Pitch to Voltage", and others that would fit almost as well as anything in the second half of the disc. The last cut, "Solo Guitar with Tin Foil", features someone, presumably Byrne, playing a haunting tune on a guitar with an impossibly clean tone-- a fitting end to an album that, for all its transcontinental fingerprints, sounds strikingly free of impurities.

Though Bush of Ghosts was a link in the chain between Steve Reich and the Bomb Squad, I'm not convinced that this talking point helps us enjoy the album. However, Nonesuch made an interesting move that could help Bush of Ghosts make history all over again: they launched a "remix" website, at www.bush-of-ghosts.com , where any of us can download multitracked versions of two songs, load them up in the editor of our choice, and under a Creative Commons license, do whatever we want with them.

As I write this, the site hasn't launched, and even if it were up, I can't tell how lively its community will be, how edgy the remixers can get, and how many rules will pen them in. Nonesuch copped out by posting only part of the album, instead of every piece of tape they owned, and I suspect that the bush-of-ghosts.com site may just be a corporate sandbox for wannabe remixers. But I could be wrong; I haven't tried to submit my mash-up of "Qu'ran" and Denmark's National Anthem yet. What matters is that they started the site and released these tracks, and by doing so, they put a stake in the ground-- not the first one, but an important one-- for Creative Commons licensing, Web 2.0 album releases ("this is an album where you participate!"), and the culture of remixing.

And by handing over their multitracks, Byrne and Eno also make a powerful acknowledgement of their own helplessness. It is a basic but real fact of our time that sampling can work both ways. In the 80s, you could fairly make an argument that Byrne and Eno were the Western white men appropriating all kinds of Others, be they domestic and primitive, or foreign and exotic. Now the world can return the favor: Anyone can rip this work apart and use it any way they please, and you can bet that if some kid in the Third World sends a killer remix to the right blogger, it'll travel faster and farther than this carefully curated reissue. Byrne and Eno counted on a certain amount of serendipity in their studio; today, they can witness the serendipity of what happens to their killer rhythm tracks-- the ones they released, and all the others that people will use anyway. And the strongest message they could send is not only that they've relinquished control, but that they admit they already lost it-- whether they like it or not.

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"My Life in the Bush of Ghosts" available for remixes

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Byrne/Eno "Bush of Ghosts" tracks re-released under CC

David Byrne and Brian Eno's masterpiece My Life In The Bush Of Ghosts (1981) has been remastered, and two of the songs are now being distributed as multitracks under a Creative Commons license for your remixing pleasure. Snip from website:

This is the first time complete and total access to original tracks with remix and sampling possibilities have been officially offered on line. In keeping with the spirit of the original album, Brian and David are offering for download all the multitracks on two of the songs. Through signing up to the user license, and in line with Creative Commons licenses, you are free to edit, remix, sample and mutilate these tracks however you like. Add them to your own song or create a new one. Visitors are welcome to post their mixes or songs that incorporate these audio files on the site for others to hear and rate.

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Is it available yet?

I clicked on links, went to boing boing etc- it looks like this isn't up yet.

I guess it's coming soon. Very interesting turn of events if this comes to pass.

Lee Knight

I loved that album.

Out! Out Jezebel OUT!

Yeah, that album had a huge influence on me. Dunno if you saw the Rolling Stone review on it. Disparaging review, saying that the hip-hop guys had used the sampling before them and done it more effectively, and saying that "Remain in Light" was far superior because it had a "real rhythm section" (?). At any rate, I really loved it when I first heard it, and love it now. I have the old CD version with "Q'uran" on it, which was subsequently taken off future copies of the CD.

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Our Lives in the Bush of Disquiet

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Our Lives in the Bush of Disquiet A dozen remixes (2006) of Brian Eno and David Byrne's My Life in the Bush of Ghosts (1981) - - - In early 2006, musicians Brian Eno and David Byrne together took two different routes in commemoration of the 25th anniversary of My Life in the Bush of Ghosts, their 1981 album that mixed found sounds and cut'n'paste techniques into arty, often danceable pop concoctions. The first was standard procedure: they remastered the original album and reissued it on CD with bonus tracks, plus liner notes that made the historical case for the album's groundbreaking approach to sampling. The second was more open-ended: Eno and Byrne uploaded to a website, bush-of-ghosts.com/remix, the constituent parts of two tracks off My Life in the Bush of Ghosts: "Help Me Somebody," a pulsating bit of ersatz African juju, and "A Secret Life," a more languorous stretch of elegiac atmospherics. The website, launched on March 8, 2006, invited fans to upload their own versions of the material, and upload they did, almost 200 renditions of the two songs in the site's first six months. If the bonus matter on the reissued CD provided a glimpse into the album's unusual recording process, the remix website opened the door to the studio and welcomed listeners in to participate. The use of remixes for promotional purposes is far from unprecedented, but it has a certain trenchant quality in regard to My Life in the Bush of Ghosts. When the album came out in 1981, it had already been several years in the making. Its backing musicians included the cream of the avant-rock world, such as bassists Busta Jones and Bill Laswell, percussionist David van Tieghem and drummer Chris Frantz (fellow member, with Byrne, of the band Talking Heads). More importantly, the vocals on the record's 11 tracks were provided by a host of unwitting accompanists in the form, then a fairly radical concept, of samples, notably exotically non-Western ethnological documentation and inherently Western evangelists. And more importantly still, the live and tape elements on My Life in the Bush of Ghosts meshed seamlessly, because Eno and Byrne chopped them all up in the process of producing the album. Well, "seamlessly" isn't the correct word in this case. The elements meshed "seamfully," given that the duo's conceptual artifice was essential to the music's flavor: multi-cultural to the point of kaleidoscopic, disinterested in narrative but packed with observations, the cacophony lending unfamiliar vibrancy to the rhythms. Now, 25 years later, everything from hip-hop to mashups to Internet culture has made sampling a fact of daily life. Mass-market personal computers arrive preloaded with software that essentially allows anyone to make his or her own Bush of Ghosts. And thus, to commemorate the album's re-release, Eno and Byrne turned their own music from subject to object, from composition to compost, from sampler to sampled. For Our Lives in the Bush of Disquiet, I contacted a dozen musicians whose work I admire; I wanted to hear what their renditions of the Eno and Byrne tracks might sound like, and none of them had yet joined in the activities at the bush-of-ghosts.com website. With only a few exceptions, these individuals already participate regularly in the loose community of musicians who post their own music for free download on the web, via netlabels, social networking services or their own websites. The 12 graciously agreed to participate in this project and the resulting compilation ranges from tributes to reconsiderations, from distant reflections to associative interpretations. There are takes on "Help Me Somebody" that milk the funk in the preacher's voice and there are takes on "A Secret Life" so quiet as to make the original sound like rock'n'roll by comparison. As sequenced here, Our Lives in the Bush of Disquiet opens with an entry, by AllThatFall, resembling what My Life in the Bush of Ghosts might have sounded like had it been created for the first time in 2006. It builds on our experience, as listeners, with music sewn from samples; what was once innovative to the point of confusion is now commonplace - the esoteric quality of the original's haphazard construction has given way to music, like AllThatFall's, that is comforting for all its ramshackle, jittery energy. Several other contributions to this project likewise reflect the joyousness of the original. MrBiggs' track burbles with tiny effects that suggest the influence of hip-hop, a then-young genre that was toying with sample-based music coincident with Eno and Byrne's late-1970s studio efforts. It also has a pure-pop melody that is entirely MrBiggs' own. Prehab's rendition, like AllThatFall's, is very much what My Life in the Bush of Ghosts might have been like were the album first produced in 2006, not so much because of its timbre but because of its politics. With its sound-bite quotes from President George W. Bush, it also serves as something of a correction to the reissue. The 2006 CD excluded a track, "Qu'ran," included on the original album, which used chanted bits of the sacred Muslim book. (In an feat of editing worthy of a Milan Kundera short story, the reissue doesn't even mention the absence of "Qu'ran.") Ego Response Technician tweaks the original fairly beyond the realm of recognition, pushing it onto the dance floor, while Roddy Schrock strikes out across the rhythmic territory of the source material, but with an ear for its minimalist tendencies. Pocka and doogie separately find a tension between rhythm and texture. Both hint at something that might suddenly gain momentum, but revel instead in the available sounds. Like Ego Response Technician's, the pieces by Mark Rushton and My Fun are far enough removed from the original album to constitute something entirely their own, something with narrative intent. What's interesting is how their use of field recordings touches on the chance rhythmic occurrences in the original, which most of the other tracks don't necessarily have to their credit, due to the way that digitally mediated sampling today routinely incurs metronomic precision. At the more atmospheric end of the continuum, several musicians aim for a spaciousness that My Life in the Bush of Ghosts only hinted at. Stephane Leonard unearths a formidable drone before violently exploding it, (dj) morsanek mixes in additional musical sources for a track whose detail-oriented effort is masked by its continuity of tone, and john kannenberg emphasizes a level of quietude that Eno and Byrne, in their pre-digital studio, likely hadn't dreamed of. These dozen tracks represent the individual musicians' various journeys through the bush of ghosts. Marc Weidenbaum Disquiet.com September 2006 PS: In addition to the dozen MP3 files, this release includes a document with information from each of the contributors about their tracks, plus a "front" and "back" cover.

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Our Lives in the Bush of Disquiet

A dozen remixes (2006) of brian eno and david byrne's my life in the bush of ghosts (1981).

OLitBoD-cover_front

In early 2006, musicians Brian Eno and David Byrne together took two different routes in commemoration of the 25th anniversary of My Life in the Bush of Ghosts , their 1981 album that mixed found sounds and cut’n’paste techniques into arty, often danceable pop concoctions.

The first was standard procedure: they remastered the original album and reissued it on CD with bonus tracks, plus liner notes that made the historical case for the album’s groundbreaking approach to sampling.

The second was more open-ended: Eno and Byrne uploaded to a website, bush-of-ghosts.com/remix , the constituent parts of two tracks off My Life in the Bush of Ghosts: “Help Me Somebody,” a pulsating bit of ersatz African juju, and “A Secret Life,” a more languorous stretch of elegiac atmospherics. The website, launched on March 8, 2006, invited fans to upload their own versions of the material, and upload they did, almost 200 renditions of the two songs in the site’s first six months.

If the bonus matter on the reissued CD provided a glimpse into the album’s unusual recording process, the remix website opened the door to the studio and welcomed listeners in to participate.

The use of remixes for promotional purposes is far from unprecedented, but it has a certain trenchant quality in regard to My Life in the Bush of Ghosts . When the album came out in 1981, it had already been several years in the making. Its backing musicians included the cream of the avant-rock world, such as bassists Busta Jones and Bill Laswell, percussionist David van Tieghem and drummer Chris Frantz (fellow member, with Byrne, of the band Talking Heads). More importantly, the vocals on the record’s 11 tracks were provided by a host of unwitting accompanists in the form, then a fairly radical concept, of samples, notably exotically non-Western ethnological documentation and inherently Western evangelists.

And more importantly still, the live and tape elements on My Life in the Bush of Ghosts meshed seamlessly, because Eno and Byrne chopped them all up in the process of producing the album. Well, “seamlessly” isn’t the correct word in this case. The elements meshed “seamfully,” given that the duo’s conceptual artifice was essential to the music’s flavor: multi-cultural to the point of kaleidoscopic, disinterested in narrative but packed with observations, the cacophony lending unfamiliar vibrancy to the rhythms.

Now, 25 years later, everything from hip-hop to mashups to Internet culture has made sampling a fact of daily life. Mass-market personal computers arrive preloaded with software that essentially allows anyone to make his or her own Bush of Ghosts . And thus, to commemorate the album’s re-release, Eno and Byrne turned their own music from subject to object, from composition to compost, from sampler to sampled.

For Our Lives in the Bush of Disquiet , I contacted a dozen musicians whose work I admire; I wanted to hear what their renditions of the Eno and Byrne tracks might sound like, and none of them had yet joined in the activities at the bush-of-ghosts.com website. With only a few exceptions, these individuals already participate regularly in the loose community of musicians who post their own music for free download on the web, via netlabels, social networking services or their own websites.

The 12 graciously agreed to participate in this project and the resulting compilation ranges from tributes to reconsiderations, from distant reflections to associative interpretations. There are takes on “Help Me Somebody” that milk the funk in the preacher’s voice and there are takes on “A Secret Life” so quiet as to make the original sound like rock’n’roll by comparison.

As sequenced here, Our Lives in the Bush of Disquiet opens with an entry, by AllThatFall , resembling what My Life in the Bush of Ghosts might have sounded like had it been created for the first time in 2006. It builds on our experience, as listeners, with music sewn from samples; what was once innovative to the point of confusion is now commonplace – the esoteric quality of the original’s haphazard construction has given way to music, like AllThatFall’s, that is comforting for all its ramshackle, jittery energy.

Several other contributions to this project likewise reflect the joyousness of the original. MrBiggs ‘ track burbles with tiny effects that suggest the influence of hip-hop, a then-young genre that was toying with sample-based music coincident with Eno and Byrne’s late-1970s studio efforts. It also has a pure-pop melody that is entirely MrBiggs’ own.

Prehab ‘s rendition, like AllThatFall’s, is very much what My Life in the Bush of Ghosts might have been like were the album first produced in 2006, not so much because of its timbre but because of its politics. With its sound-bite quotes from President George W. Bush, it also serves as something of a correction to the reissue. The 2006 CD excluded a track, “Qu’ran,” included on the original album, which used chanted bits of the sacred Muslim book. (In an feat of editing worthy of a Milan Kundera short story, the reissue doesn’t even mention the absence of “Qu’ran.”)

Ego Response Technician tweaks the original fairly beyond the realm of recognition, pushing it onto the dance floor, while Roddy Schrock strikes out across the rhythmic territory of the source material, but with an ear for its minimalist tendencies.

Pocka and doogie separately find a tension between rhythm and texture. Both hint at something that might suddenly gain momentum, but revel instead in the available sounds.

Like Ego Response Technician’s, the pieces by Mark Rushton and My Fun are far enough removed from the original album to constitute something entirely their own, something with narrative intent. What’s interesting is how their use of field recordings touches on the chance rhythmic occurrences in the original, which most of the other tracks don’t necessarily have to their credit, due to the way that digitally mediated sampling today routinely incurs metronomic precision.

At the more atmospheric end of the continuum, several musicians aim for a spaciousness that My Life in the Bush of Ghosts only hinted at. Stephane Leonard unearths a formidable drone before violently exploding it, (dj) morsanek mixes in additional musical sources for a track whose detail-oriented effort is masked by its continuity of tone, and john kannenberg emphasizes a level of quietude that Eno and Byrne, in their pre-digital studio, likely hadn’t dreamed of.

These dozen tracks represent the individual musicians’ various journeys through the bush of ghosts.

  • “Help Me Help Me” – AllThatFall ( MP3 )
  • “If You Make Your Bed in Heaven” – Roddy Schrock ( MP3 )
  • “Leftover Secrets to Tell” – Pocka ( MP3 )
  • “Secret Life Remix” – Stephane Leonard ( MP3 )
  • “The Black Isle (Byrne/Eno Remix)” – (dj) morsanek ( MP3 )
  • “Hit Me Somebody (Help Me Somebody Remix)” – MrBiggs ( MP3 )
  • “Being and Nothingness (A Secret Life Remixed)” – john kannenberg (MP3 )
  • “Somebody Help Us” – My Fun ( MP3 )
  • “Hey” – Mark Rushton ( MP3 )
  • “My Bush in the Secret Life of Ghosts” – Prehab ( MP3 )
  • “Not Enough Africa” – Ego Response Technician ( MP3 )
  • “Helping (Help Me Somebody Remix)” – doogie ( MP3 )

Information on the 12 Contributors:

Act: AllThatFall

Musician’s Name: Kevin S. Gipson

Residence: New Orleans, Louisiana, U.S.

Track Name: “Help Me Help Me”

Original Bush of Ghosts Track: “Help Me Somebody”

Website: allthatfall.com

Software, Equipment and Other Processes Employed in the Production of Remix: I did a bit of manual splicing and truncating of the samples in Goldwave, particularly with the percussion. This introduced some transients into the samples that give the beat its wonderful clickiness. I also did some sound-design in Max/MSP, primarily with a feedback patch I wrote to interface with my Berhinger BCR2000 control surface. This patch granularizes live input, and allows me to filter and manipulate the resultant sound in real-time. I hope to post this patch to my website, though it’ll be largely useless to someone without the lovely BCR. I then imported these sounds into Frooty, where I do all my sequencing. In between these steps, I did a ton of note scribbling. I like to write little play algorithms to guide the compositional process, though they’re only half-followed.

Aim in Producing This Rendition of the Original Source Material: I decided very early to use the original samples exclusively. I’m not a purist about remixes (I’m working on a remix for Sebastian Krueger right now, and gleefully adding all sorts of new material to his already-lovely track). I suppose I just felt like being arbitrary, but ultimately the stricture helped keep the remix terse and textually coherent. Also, “Help Me Somebody” seems to me to be just one big building-up. So I gave my remix a very pared-down, ABACAB structure. Again, a totally indefensible and arbitrary move on my part, though I have been doing it a lot in my tracks lately. My track on the forthcoming LuvSound.Org compilation is another ABACAB construction, though the sound design is completely out there. It’s a fun disjunction, I think. And my stuff has been really dense lately, so I decided to try and be a bit minimalist with the remix. I wanted to do something Matthew Dear-ish. I probably ended up filling all the blank spaces with little micro-edits despite myself, though. So there are all these abstractions and pseudo-algorithms; the final product is always more a thing of happy accident than anything else.

Act: doogie

Residence: Lancaster, Pennsylvania

Track Name: “helping”

Track #: 12

Website: fluxed.net

Software, Equipment and Other Processes Employed in the Production of Remix: This remix utilizes somewhat archaic, but digital, sampling techniques. The software and plug-ins used are not especially important and I did not rely on software alone to complete the remix. It was simply a vehicle. The important technique, and one becoming more prevalent in my work, is allowing the song to become part of the environment.

Aim in Producing This Rendition of the Original Source Material: My overall goal with this material was to inject minimalism into the song to highlight what I felt was most important. Society moves exponentially faster every hour and the goal of the entire doogie project is to slow it down to the point where people can again see themselves moving. This is currently being accomplished by stripping down a song and adding layers on top that also seem to decrease speed.

Act: Ego Response Technician

Musician’s Name: Shawn White

Residence: Denton, Texas, U.S.

Track Name: “Not Enough Africa”

Track #: 11

Website: xtrasauce.com

Software, Equipment and Other Processes Employed in the Production of Remix: Cubase VST, CoolEdit Pro 2000, AmazingMidi, microKorg, Dr. 202.

Aim in Producing This Rendition of the Original Source Material: I wanted to create something that was connected to the original song in some way, but not in any conventional sense. I used the original tracks to generate midi via AmazingMidi and then inserted sounds I’d programmed myself.

Musician’s Name: john kannenberg

Residence: Chicago, Illinois, U.S.

Track Name: “Being and Nothingness”

Original Bush of Ghosts Track: “A Secret Life”

Website: johnkannenberg.com

Software, Equipment and Other Processes Employed in the Production of Remix: Bias’s Peak and Apple’s Soundtrack on a 12″ G4 Powerbook.

Aim in Producing This Rendition of the Original Source Material: I intentionally made sure not to re-listen to the original version of the track before producing my remix, as I wanted the chance to approach the material in a completely detached way. Although Bush of Ghosts has always been an incredibly influential album for me, I have not listened to it for several years and have not yet purchased the re-release. My goal was to pick and choose elements of the sound sources that felt similar to sounds I would collect or create for my own work and use them to create something that wholly represented my current sonic aesthetic. While I heavily manipulated a select few of the sounds, most of them were kept relatively intact but their relationships to each other were (in my view) radically changed.

Musician’s Name: Stephane Leonard

Residence: Berlin, Germany

Track Name: “Secret Life Remix”

Website: stephaneleonard.net

Software, Equipment and Other Processes Employed in the Production of Remix: I am mostly using the sampler and audio-processing tools that I build myself in Max/MSP. The final arrangements, mix and mastering are done in different sequencer programs: Logic, Tracktion…

Aim in Producing This Rendition of the Original Source Material: For me doing a remix is to (almost) completely rely on the material that comes from the original tracks. I don’t mind when people include their own things but to me the music that I choose to remix is already so rich and diverse that I feel like I have plenty of challenging sounds and tones to work with. (In the remix of “A Secret Life” I have to admit that I did use one of my own field recordings.) I don’t remix because I think that the original track is missing something or because I feel like I could do better… I remix out of respect. It is a way to show others where you come from and what inspires you.

Eno and Byrne have always been a great inspiration for my work. On the Bush of Ghosts record one can hear how careful they mix music and samples taken from all over the world to create a very peaceful balance and a unique atmosphere that seems easy for us to understand nowadays, but back in 1981 this record introduced a lot of people to a complete new style of music. Since I work with field recordings and samples that I collect from all over the world myself I especially enjoyed working on that remix project.

I chose to work with “A Secret Life” because I have always loved that Arabic sample and the synthesizers in the background. My remix is almost completely based on these synthesizers and the Arabic singing. Just like Eno and Byrne, my aim was to knit together different musical styles — in my case: ambient and noise.

I am also trying to refer to the theme of the ghost by creating tones and atmospheres that could sound like ethereal voices or chanting out of a different universe. It became a dark piece that has probably a little more to do with Eno’s ambient work… but I didn’t mean to be unfriendly… maybe a little spooky — I guess that is how I feel right now — sitting here in Berlin surrounded by German flags, soccer fanatics and this new sense of German patriotism that I have a hard time understanding…

Act: (dj) morsanek

Musician’s Name: Mark Morse

Residence: Amsterdam, Netherlands

Track Name: “The Black Isle (Byrne/Eno Remix)”

Original Bush of Ghosts Track: elements of both “A Secret Life” and “Help Me Somebody”

Website: offbeater.blogspot.com

Software, Equipment and Other Processes Employed in the Production of Remix: I assembled 37 “tracks” of audio (18 of which were Bush of Ghosts tracks) in Sony (formerly Sonic Foundry)’s ACID Music Studio. For VSTs, I used mda DubDelay, Sinus FreeVerb, and Arguru Software’s Stardust Mastering VST for a little compression (all freeware…thanks!). As for the non-Byrne/Eno sounds used, I’m lucky enough to be part of a community of composers and improvisers who regularly record and release solo performances, so I have an unusual amount of amazing raw material to work with from a sample perspective. For any gaps that need filling, I use AudioMulch to process my guitar or build sequences with Image-Line’s FL Studio.

Aim in Producing This Rendition of the Original Source Material: Since I wasn’t very familiar with the original versions, it wasn’t a question of trying to highlight or retain anything special from the original mixes. I was mostly trying to apply this kind of story/collage-building process I’d been using to Bush of Ghosts: find raw materials I liked (exploiting coincidences between tracks from both Bush of Ghosts songs, and avoiding events that are too idiomatically charged because they break the illusion a lot of times), and then just start putting sounds next to each other and seeing what means something. And once you get one compelling coincidence, then you can look for a second, and the direction or the narrative of the mix starts to determine itself.

Act: MrBiggs

Musician’s Name: Brian Biggs

Residence: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S.

Track Name: “Hit Me Somebody (Help Me Somebody Remix)”

Website: mrbiggs.com

Software, Equipment and Other Processes Employed in the Production of Remix: Apple iMac G5 and MacBook Pro, Ableton Live, Propellorhead Reason & Recycle, Audacity, RadioShack microphone, various sampled whistles and clicks.

Aim in Producing This Rendition of the Original Source Material: I didn’t have much in the way of “intent” in working on this, my first musical piece of more than one minute long. Rather, I spent some time making a series of interesting-sounding (to me) noises and loops that in some way came from the original tracks, then started laying them out in a sequencer to see what happened. I attempted to keep the piece “recognizable” to a point. For example, the main synth loop mirrors pretty closely the finger-picked guitar in the original, and the congas and high hats were based on the congas and hats from the original tracks.

Act: My Fun

Musician’s Name: Justin Hardison

Place of Residence: London, England

Track Name: “Somebody Help Us”

Original Bush of Ghosts Track: “Help Me Somebody” (but there may be elements of both)

Website: thelandof.org

Software, Equipment and Other Processes Employed in the Production of Remix: Sony mic/MiniDisc recorder, Ableton Live, Reaktor and various plug-ins.

Aim in Producing This Rendition of the Original Source Material: I wanted to approach it as I would with any My Fun track and pick sounds I was fond of and process/re-process them. Once I got started I found that I had field recordings that were very similar to the sounds of the original recordings (preacher and bird sounds etc.) and decided to include them. Since some of the sounds are similar, I’m not sure if it’s really a continuation of Byrne/Eno’s loose concept of combining disparate sources and creating a musical piece from it, but I think it somehow keeps with this rough outline. Overall I wanted to create a track that was both musical and yet sounded like a raw field recording as well.

Musician’s Name: Brad Mitchell

Residence: New York, New York, U.S.

Track Name: “Leftover Secrets to Tell”

Website: kikapu.com/pocka

Software, Equipment and Other Processes Employed in the Production of Remix: I kept it very simple for this remix; aside from a handful of samples that I loaded in a sampler and played live through some distortion pedals, everything else was manipulated and sequenced in Ableton Live. These distorted samples were overdubbed while playing through the already sequenced sections.

Aim in Producing This Rendition of the Original Source Material: I really wanted to strip “A Secret Life” down to its basic elements and re-build it into something instantly recognizable when compared to the original, yet less busy than the original. It ended up becoming a simplified remix, but still very dense. Minimal yet intense was the overriding theme here.

Act: Prehab

Musician’s Name: Michael Ross

Residence: Manhattan, New York

Track Name: “My Bush in the Secret Life of Ghosts”

Track #: 10

Website: I am the last human, pet or institution without a website but can be contacted at [email protected]

Software, Equipment and Other Processes Employed in the Production of Remix: I used Ableton Live. I picked the tracks that appealed to me from the site and edited them into clips. I mapped some of them (synth sounds and chanting) across some keys of an M-Audio Oxygen 8 keyboard and went for a performance, playing them against a bass loop made from one of the sound files and fattened with a free plug-in called Camel Phat. I added a loop made from the woodblock file, which was re-pitched, run through a free filter plug called Ohmygod and ping-ponged with a Live plug. I then played guitar with a eBow through Amplitube 2, duplicated the track and pitched one of them up an octave. The George W clips I got from a website online.

Aim in Producing This Rendition of the Original Source Material: I fear that anyone who hangs in through the glacial beginnings of the mix will soon divine the all too obvious intent. When the original was recorded, the Muslim chanting used by Byrne and Eno was a bit of innocent exotica at best, a little cultural imperialism at worst. Either way it worked beautifully. Post-9/11, the cries of these Islamic people have developed a whole other resonance. Whether or not Eno and Byrne had any idea what those voices were singing (I suspect not), we the audience did not. Thus I felt that chopping up those chants emphasized our use of them as “color” rather than any real understanding.

Not convinced that my reassessment of the chilling emotional effect of those chants would be shared by enough listeners, I decided to ram the point home with the Bush clips (the “bush” pun only occurred to me later — I swear). Having added those, I realized that my emotional reaction to them was mixed; I despise the man, but nothing that he says in those clips from 9/11 is untrue, or anything less than what most Americans, Red or Blue, were feeling at the time.

I tried to emulate the cultural shift by starting with the “lonely desert” effect and building to the cacophony of the angry Muslim world with which we now must contend. Unsubtle perhaps, but hopefully emblematic of how we may no longer have the luxury of charming exotica.

Act: Mark Rushton

Residence: Cedar Rapids, Iowa

Track Name: “Hey”

Website: markrushton.com

Software, Equipment and Other Processes Employed in the Production of Remix: About half of the “Help Me Somebody” loops, Acid Pro, Sound Forge, a MiniDisc recorder, binaural microphones, and voicemail.

Aim in Producing This Rendition of the Original Source Material: In my version, I wanted to change the tone of the “Help Me Somebody” sample from that of a preacher delivering a sermon to somebody actually in need of help.

I was in downtown Cedar Rapids this spring recording trains, vehicles going over railroad tracks, and the sound produced by an interstate highway beneath an overpass. When I was recording the interstate sounds, I happened upon a place where a couple of homeless people had been living under a bridge. They had been sleeping directly under the roadway, so I recorded what that sounded like. It was a deafening roar. If anybody’s sleeping just a couple feet under concrete that’s being traversed by cars and semi-trucks then they’re obviously in need of some help.

The storyline for the track is this: A character is walking around downtown, muttering sounds and knocking on doors. Traffic, trains, and the instrumental samples blend together to illustrate a sense of movement, wandering, and psychedelia. When the character finally calls out for help after the wailing of the train’s brakes, traffic keeps driving by anyway. Fade out…

Act: Roddy Schrock

Residence: San Francisco, California

Track Name: “If You Make Your Bed In Heaven”

Website: fundamentallysound.org

Software, Equipment and Other Processes Employed in the Production of Remix: Ableton Live and SuperCollider

Aim in Producing This Rendition of the Original Source Material: To find another way to musically handle those crazy preacher-man vocals.

4 thoughts on “ Our Lives in the Bush of Disquiet ”

Hello. Great job all of you did with the Eno/Byrne source. I have used the track # 5 – The Black Isle (Byrne/Eno Remix) as soundtrack of my video about Sayano-Shushenskaya accident. Now i’m planning to make another video using the track # 10 – My Bush in the Secret Life of Ghosts. Perhaps in this case i’m going to add some additional sounds. Well, Thank you for sharing this nice and interesting job. My best regards.

Hello! The video about Sayano-Shushenskaya accident, with The Black Isle by morsanek is at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yfZoq68x7lY and the video named My Disquiet In The Bush Of Killers with My Bush in the Secret Life of Ghosts by Prehab is at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZD3f3NCF9gQ Thank you very much for such kind of music and for sharing it! My best regards.

Another version of My Disquiet in the Bush of Killers is here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0lHUq_ad4No It’s very similar to the private version from the previous post, but not equal. It is public. Thank you to Prehab for using his nice music. My best regards.

The video using the music of morsanek (The black isle) is in this link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yfZoq68x7lY and it is about the Sayano-Shushenskaya Dam accident. Thank you to morsanek for using his nice music. Very unknown but talented musicians here… My best regards.

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Remix My Life in the Bush of Ghosts

David Byrne and Brian Eno’s landmark sampling album My Life in the Bush of Ghosts was recently remastered and reissued with extensive liner notes, photos, and previously unreleased bonus tracks. To celebrate the release, Byrne and Eno launched bush-of-ghosts.com where the audio source files from two of the classic tracks from Bush of Ghosts — “A Secret Life” and “Help Me Somebody” — are offered under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5 license , so you can (subject to the download terms of use) use them to make remixes. The site allows uploads and user ratings, as well as the ability to share videos you make for music on Bush of Ghosts .

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Our Lives in the Bush of Disquiet: A dozen remixes (2006) of Brian Eno and David Byrne’s My Life in the Bush of Ghosts (1981)

in Album/CD/DVD Covers , Art , Commons , Copyright/left , Remix Culture | Tuesday, January 30th, 2007 | 0 Commenti » Trackback

bush of ghosts remix

Text source: www.archive.org/ 1. “Help Me Help Me” – AllThatFall 2. “If You Make Your Bed in Heaven” – Roddy Schrock 3. “Leftover Secrets to Tell” – Pocka 4. “Secret Life Remix” – Stephane Leonard 5. “The Black Isle (Byrne/Eno Remix)” – (dj) morsanek 6. “Hit Me Somebody (Help Me Somebody Remix)” – MrBiggs 7. “Being and Nothingness (A Secret Life Remixed)” – john kannenberg 8. “Somebody Help Us” – My Fun 9. “Hey” – Mark Rushton 10. “My Bush in the Secret Life of Ghosts” – Prehab 11. “Not Enough Africa” – Ego Response Technician 12. “Helping (Help Me Somebody Remix)” – doogie Commissioned and compiled by Marc Weidenbaum (disquiet.com) Album graphic design by boon/Brian Scott (boondesign.com)

Original Eno/Byrne website: bush-of-ghosts.com/remix Bush of Disquiet webpage: disquiet.com/bushofghosts

Author: Marc Weidenbaum Date: 2006-09-04 Keywords: byrne, eno, ambient, remix

Creative Commons license: Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike Notes

Our Lives in the Bush of Disquiet

A dozen remixes (2006) of Brian Eno and David Byrne’s My Life in the Bush of Ghosts (1981)

– – –

In early 2006, musicians Brian Eno and David Byrne together took two different routes in commemoration of the 25th anniversary of My Life in the Bush of Ghosts, their 1981 album that mixed found sounds and cut’n’paste techniques into arty, often danceable pop concoctions.

The first was standard procedure: they remastered the original album and reissued it on CD with bonus tracks, plus liner notes that made the historical case for the album’s groundbreaking approach to sampling.

The second was more open-ended: Eno and Byrne uploaded to a website, bush-of-ghosts.com/remix, the constituent parts of two tracks off My Life in the Bush of Ghosts: “Help Me Somebody,” a pulsating bit of ersatz African juju, and “A Secret Life,” a more languorous stretch of elegiac atmospherics. The website, launched on March 8, 2006, invited fans to upload their own versions of the material, and upload they did, almost 200 renditions of the two songs in the site’s first six months.

If the bonus matter on the reissued CD provided a glimpse into the album’s unusual recording process, the remix website opened the door to the studio and welcomed listeners in to participate.

The use of remixes for promotional purposes is far from unprecedented, but it has a certain trenchant quality in regard to My Life in the Bush of Ghosts. When the album came out in 1981, it had already been several years in the making. Its backing musicians included the cream of the avant-rock world, such as bassists Busta Jones and Bill Laswell, percussionist David van Tieghem and drummer Chris Frantz (fellow member, with Byrne, of the band Talking Heads). More importantly, the vocals on the record’s 11 tracks were provided by a host of unwitting accompanists in the form, then a fairly radical concept, of samples, notably exotically non-Western ethnological documentation and inherently Western evangelists.

And more importantly still, the live and tape elements on My Life in the Bush of Ghosts meshed seamlessly, because Eno and Byrne chopped them all up in the process of producing the album. Well, “seamlessly” isn’t the correct word in this case. The elements meshed “seamfully,” given that the duo’s conceptual artifice was essential to the music’s flavor: multi-cultural to the point of kaleidoscopic, disinterested in narrative but packed with observations, the cacophony lending unfamiliar vibrancy to the rhythms.

Now, 25 years later, everything from hip-hop to mashups to Internet culture has made sampling a fact of daily life. Mass-market personal computers arrive preloaded with software that essentially allows anyone to make his or her own Bush of Ghosts. And thus, to commemorate the album’s re-release, Eno and Byrne turned their own music from subject to object, from composition to compost, from sampler to sampled.

For Our Lives in the Bush of Disquiet, I contacted a dozen musicians whose work I admire; I wanted to hear what their renditions of the Eno and Byrne tracks might sound like, and none of them had yet joined in the activities at the bush-of-ghosts.com website. With only a few exceptions, these individuals already participate regularly in the loose community of musicians who post their own music for free download on the web, via netlabels, social networking services or their own websites.

The 12 graciously agreed to participate in this project and the resulting compilation ranges from tributes to reconsiderations, from distant reflections to associative interpretations. There are takes on “Help Me Somebody” that milk the funk in the preacher’s voice and there are takes on “A Secret Life” so quiet as to make the original sound like rock’n’roll by comparison.

As sequenced here, Our Lives in the Bush of Disquiet opens with an entry, by AllThatFall, resembling what My Life in the Bush of Ghosts might have sounded like had it been created for the first time in 2006. It builds on our experience, as listeners, with music sewn from samples; what was once innovative to the point of confusion is now commonplace – the esoteric quality of the original’s haphazard construction has given way to music, like AllThatFall’s, that is comforting for all its ramshackle, jittery energy.

Several other contributions to this project likewise reflect the joyousness of the original. MrBiggs’ track burbles with tiny effects that suggest the influence of hip-hop, a then-young genre that was toying with sample-based music coincident with Eno and Byrne’s late-1970s studio efforts. It also has a pure-pop melody that is entirely MrBiggs’ own.

Prehab’s rendition, like AllThatFall’s, is very much what My Life in the Bush of Ghosts might have been like were the album first produced in 2006, not so much because of its timbre but because of its politics. With its sound-bite quotes from President George W. Bush, it also serves as something of a correction to the reissue. The 2006 CD excluded a track, “Qu’ran,” included on the original album, which used chanted bits of the sacred Muslim book. (In an feat of editing worthy of a Milan Kundera short story, the reissue doesn’t even mention the absence of “Qu’ran.”)

Ego Response Technician tweaks the original fairly beyond the realm of recognition, pushing it onto the dance floor, while Roddy Schrock strikes out across the rhythmic territory of the source material, but with an ear for its minimalist tendencies.

Pocka and doogie separately find a tension between rhythm and texture. Both hint at something that might suddenly gain momentum, but revel instead in the available sounds.

Like Ego Response Technician’s, the pieces by Mark Rushton and My Fun are far enough removed from the original album to constitute something entirely their own, something with narrative intent. What’s interesting is how their use of field recordings touches on the chance rhythmic occurrences in the original, which most of the other tracks don’t necessarily have to their credit, due to the way that digitally mediated sampling today routinely incurs metronomic precision.

At the more atmospheric end of the continuum, several musicians aim for a spaciousness that My Life in the Bush of Ghosts only hinted at. Stephane Leonard unearths a formidable drone before violently exploding it, (dj) morsanek mixes in additional musical sources for a track whose detail-oriented effort is masked by its continuity of tone, and john kannenberg emphasizes a level of quietude that Eno and Byrne, in their pre-digital studio, likely hadn’t dreamed of.

These dozen tracks represent the individual musicians’ various journeys through the bush of ghosts.

Marc Weidenbaum Disquiet.com September 2006

PS: In addition to the dozen MP3 files, this release includes a document with information from each of the contributors about their tracks, plus a “front” and “back” cover.

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Bush of Ghosts - by Amos Tutuola

Published in 1954, "My Life in the Bush of Ghosts" is Amos Tutuola's second novel.  When you read the book, you will understand why David Byrne and Brian Eno used this very title for their ground-breaking album - because it stimulates your imagination. 

The StoryLine

The book narrates a young boy's adventures who tries to escape an army of slave traders along with his brother. However, Fate separates him from his brother and takes him into a wilderness, which transports him to an entirely different world inhabited by ghosts and spirits.

He is too young to understand the perils that he, as a mortal he will have to endure and all by himself. He is also too young to discriminate between "good" and "bad." In a series of unprecedented encounters, the boy hops from ghost town to ghost town - getting transformed into a cow, buried alive, is web-wrapped to become a spider's food, among other things.

In this twenty-four year journey, he is ridden in chaos. In time, he accepts his Fate, learns to outwit his adversaries and even gets married - twice.

He has finally accepted his Fate that there is no escape route from here. However, he ends up coming across the television handed Goddess, who does show him a way out.

The novel is an unusually striking one - a story situated outside the boundaries of time in a different part of the world. For an American or any reader in the western world, it is hard to tell whether these are figments of imagination or beliefs of Yoruba culture. The book is a reflection of the amalgamation of Yoruba and Christian cultures. The book opens a window into the beliefs in the Yoruba tradition about the afterlife.

The Bush is essentially where the dead reside until judgement day and where the narrator, the seven-year-old boy, is unwittingly trapped. The story's setting is in a land where everything seems unreal, and there is no instruction manual. Specific details, like a hierarchy, a church, a hospital, schools, money and the part where the boy meets his dead cousin, make the reader wonder if this is a parallel world.

The Writing Style

This homegrown African adventure has an entirely different way of telling a story. It is a broken narrative where many stories keep appearing out of sequence. Also, the style in which the narration takes place is closer to African storytelling rather than composition. One may even argue that the writing follows no syntax. As unsophisticated as the language is, it indeed calls for a second read.

Moreover, the boy is stuck with grotesque other-worldly beings who do not speak his language. Hence, speech is impossible, and the narration is episodic rather than spontaneous. It smoothly conveys African myths naturally and conversationally, presenting facts in the most bizarre way that makes them sound believable.

The book begins with a young boy being abandoned by his step-mother in the face of war - managing to have the reader side with him immediately. With fantastic imagery that captures one's imagination, the book offers a refreshing change of thought.

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IMAGES

  1. Stream Love Electropica (from Bush of Ghosts Remix) by GREEN GREEN

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  2. Brian Eno Bush of Ghosts Dubstep Remix

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  3. My Life In The Bush Of Ghosts (Enhanced): Amazon.co.uk: Music

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  4. My Life in the Bush of Ghosts (Remastered)

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  5. My Life in the Bush of Ghosts (Expanded) CD + MP3 Bundle

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  6. arch selections: Bush of Ghosts

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COMMENTS

  1. My Life in the Bush of Ghosts

    My Life in the Bush of Ghosts is the first collaborative studio album by Brian Eno and David Byrne, released in February 1981. It was Byrne's first album without his band Talking Heads. The album integrates sampled vocals and found sounds, African and Middle Eastern rhythms, and electronic music techniques. [7]

  2. Nonesuch Records My Life in the Bush of Ghosts

    My Life in the Bush of Ghosts | Nonesuch Records - MP3 Downloads, Free Streaming Music, Lyrics My Life in the Bush of Ghosts by Brian Eno + David Byrne Track Listing 1 America Is Waiting 3:36 2 Mea Culpa 4:57 3 Regiment 4:10 4 Help Me Somebody 4:18 5 The Jezebel Spirit 4:55 6 Very, Very Hungry 3:20 7 Moonlight in Glory 4:30 8 The Carrier 4:19 9

  3. Bush Of Ghosts Remix

    View credits, reviews, tracks and shop for the 2004 CD release of "Bush Of Ghosts Remix" on Discogs.

  4. My Life in the Bush of Ghosts

    The setlist of Bush of Ghosts has changed several times over the years, and the diehard fans will still have to swap left-out cuts that aren't resurrected here; most famously, "Qu'ran", an...

  5. David Byrne and Brian Eno's My Life in the Bush of Ghosts Remix Site

    For the first time ever, fans are able to legally remix and share their own personal versions of two songs from David Byrne and Brian Eno's groundbreaking album My Life in the Bush of Ghosts. The interactive forum bush-of-ghosts.com has been developed to celebrate the reissue of the album 25 years after its original release. By agreeing to ...

  6. "My Life in the Bush of Ghosts" available for remixes

    Byrne/Eno "Bush of Ghosts" tracks re-released under CC David Byrne and Brian Eno's masterpiece My Life In The Bush Of Ghosts (1981) has been remastered, and two of the songs are now being distributed as multitracks under a Creative Commons license for your remixing pleasure.

  7. Bush of Ghosts

    World Music Brewed Together The album brings together various kinds of hip-hop music, funk, ambient music, eastern percussion, afrobeat, and more. They picked up their samples from a wide range of sources.

  8. Thomas Park with Brian Eno and David Byrne- My Vision In The Bush Of

    Thomas Park, Brian Eno, David Byrne, My Life In The Bush Of Ghosts, Hip Hop, House, Remix, Generative I used many of Eno and Byrnes cc-licensed sounds from their remix compo, together with some other sounds and a Generative Python Application by myself.

  9. David Byrne and Brian Eno's "Bush of Ghosts" remix site launches today

    David Byrne and Brian Eno's landmark sampling album My Life in the Bush of Ghosts was recently remastered and reissued with extensive liner notes, photos, previously unreleased bonus tracks, and the short film Mea Culpa by multimedia artist Bruce Conner. Now comes the best part! Today, Byrne and Eno launched a Web site where the…

  10. Update: Found the Stems for My Life in the Bush of Ghosts by David

    In 2009 as part of the re-release of My Life in the Bush of Ghosts, the stems to the tracks Help Me Somebody and A Secret Life were both available to download and remix from the Bush of Ghosts website, sadly, from what I can tell, the website used flash somewhere in the download process and these stems became unavailable on the internet, but not...

  11. Our Lives in the Bush of Disquiet

    Notes. Our Lives in the Bush of Disquiet A dozen remixes (2006) of Brian Eno and David Byrne's My Life in the Bush of Ghosts (1981) - - - In early 2006, musicians Brian Eno and David Byrne together took two different routes in commemoration of the 25th anniversary of My Life in the Bush of Ghosts, their 1981 album that mixed found sounds and cut'n'paste techniques into arty, often danceable ...

  12. Headful of Ghosts (Radio Remix)

    [Verse 1] I stand around at American weddings I stand around for family At my best when I'm maverick inside At my best when it's all me I was there when you took all the people I was alone in a...

  13. Brian Eno Bush of Ghosts Dubstep Remix

    A remix of Brian Eno's Bush of Ghosts using sound samples from "help me somebody" and "A secret life". Turned into some grimey dub mashup. EnjoyAnd I know I ...

  14. Byrne/Eno 24 track masters available for download/remix: bush-of-ghosts

    For any David Byrne/Brian Eno enthusiasts out there, 2 tracks from their classic My Life In The Bush Of Ghosts album are available as a 24 track downlo For any David Byrne/Brian Eno enthusiasts out there, 2 tracks from their classic My Life In The...

  15. Our Lives in the Bush of Disquiet

    In early 2006, musicians Brian Eno and David Byrne together took two different routes in commemoration of the 25th anniversary of My Life in the Bush of Ghosts, their 1981 album that mixed found sounds and cut'n'paste techniques into arty, often danceable pop concoctions.. The first was standard procedure: they remastered the original album and reissued it on CD with bonus tracks, plus ...

  16. Remix My Life in the Bush of Ghosts

    Remix My Life in the Bush of Ghosts by Alex Gakuru Open Culture David Byrne and Brian Eno's landmark sampling album My Life in the Bush of Ghosts was recently remastered and reissued with extensive liner notes, photos, and previously unreleased bonus tracks.

  17. David Byrne and Brian Eno

    Album: David Byrne and Brian Eno - My Life In The Bush Of Ghosts 1981; Tracklist: 1. "America Is Waiting" (Byrne, Eno, Laswell, Wright, Van Tieghem) - 3:38 2...

  18. Remix Theory » Archivio » Our Lives in the Bush of Disquiet: A dozen

    For Our Lives in the Bush of Disquiet, I contacted a dozen musicians whose work I admire; I wanted to hear what their renditions of the Eno and Byrne tracks might sound like, and none of them had yet joined in the activities at the bush-of-ghosts.com website.

  19. How to remix music

    Create Blueprint Create a blueprint first, and then add your signature elements to it by experimenting with different effects in your DAW and playing around with different styles. Again, this is where your ears are your best friends. Once You have these basics in place, you can go about reconstructing your track.

  20. My Life In The Bush Of Ghosts Remix site

    KVR Audio Forum - My Life In The Bush Of Ghosts Remix site - Everything Else (Music related) Forum

  21. Bush Of Ghosts Remix

    Bush Of Ghosts Bush Of Ghosts Remix. Album JP 2004 on M.O.P. Recordings label Reggae (Dub) Musicians. Bush Of Ghosts, album by: Producers. E-Da remix: Icchie remix: Shiro The Goodman remix: Equalizer remix: Green ... Bush Of Ghosts: 3:46: External Links Discogs. ArtistInfo App

  22. My Life In The Bush Of Ghosts Remix site

    "the ghost of my life, bush*" remix coming soonish... *-often used term for certain vegetation that some people seem to associate with me . vurtreon. Top. ... BUT im in total agreement..there was a synchronicity between Bush of Ghosts and Remain in Light that was not present in the earlier lp's and certainly not repeated later...much like when ...

  23. Bush of Ghosts

    How to remix music; Bush of Ghosts - by Amos Tutuola. Published in 1954, "My Life in the Bush of Ghosts" is Amos Tutuola's second novel. When you read the book, you will understand why David Byrne and Brian Eno used this very title for their ground-breaking album - because it stimulates your imagination. ...