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takiyasha the witch and the skeleton spectre original

Takiyasha the Witch and the Skeleton Specter

Takiyasha the Witch and the Skeleton Specter, Utagawa Kuniyoshi

Takiyasha the Witch and the Skeleton Specter is an Edo Period   Wood Block   Print created by Utagawa Kuniyoshi from c. 1843 to 1847 . It lives at the Honolulu Museum of Art in the United States . The image is in the Public Domain , and tagged Skulls , Ghosts , Witches and Skeletons . Download See Takiyasha the Witch and the Skeleton Specter in the Kaleidoscope

A girl and her monster

In 939CE in the Heian period in Japan, the samurai warlord Taira no Masakado marched west from his home in Kantō, leading a doomed army against Japan’s central government in Kyoto. After fifty-nine days of victories against government outposts, Masakado’s cousin, Taira no Sadamori, faced down his army and killed Masakado in the battle of Kojima.

This image tells the strange story of what came after the revolt. Masakado’s daughter, the Princess Takiyasha, lives in the family’s shōen, the once great palace of Soma. The ghosts of soldiers fallen in the revolution haunt the moldering ruins, and Princess Takiyasha has turned to witchcraft . She meets with a mountain hermit and studies dark magic, plotting revenge on her uncle Sadamori, who cut off her father’s head and carried it to Tokyo.

In this print we see the princess on the left, framed in the broken palace blinds. She grips a magic scroll, reading the spell to summon a Gashadokuro . Let’s take a moment to appreciate this monstrous yōkai of Japanese imagination. Gashadokuro appear as gigantic skeletons , assembled from the combined bones of famine victims, or in this case, the bodies of the soldiers that followed Masakado to their deaths. These towering spirits were believed to haunt isolated country roads, snatching up solitary travelers to bite off their heads and drink their gouting blood. Edo Japan knew a thing or two about ghost stories.

So Princess Takiyasha reads her scroll, and the Gashadokuro rips through a curtain wall. Below the monster, cower Ōya Taro Mitsukuni and another samurai, agents of the emperor sent to hunt down the princess. And while contemporary eyes might understandably side with the vengeful princess and her magic monster (I'm looking at you Pixar), the hero of this image is supposed to be Mitsukuni, who valiantly defeated the witch and her beast in service of the Emperor.

The artist behind the beast

This delightful horror story is from the Story of Utö Yasutaka, written in 1807 by the Edo poet Santö Kyöden, and captured in this print by the Ukiyo-e artist Utagawa Kuniyoshi . Kuniyoshi illustrated many tales from Japanese folklore, history and myth, and Princess Takiyasha was well-known to him and his audience.

One more note on the giant skeleton. In Edo Japan, the study of anatomy was considerably less systematic than in Europe, so the detail and accuracy Kuniyoshi brought to his Gashadokuro skeleton is marvelous for its day. It’s thought that Kuniyoshi owned a copy of a rare and influential book called the Kaitai Shinsho , or the New Book of Anatomy, a volume of 40 woodcut scientific illustrations by the German physician Johann Adam Kulmus translated into Japanese by the Edo physician and scholar Sugita Genpaku.

Reed Enger, "Takiyasha the Witch and the Skeleton Specter," in Obelisk Art History , Published June 08, 2016; last modified November 07, 2022, http://www.arthistoryproject.com/artists/utagawa-kuniyoshi/takiyasha-the-witch-and-the-skeleton-spectre/.

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Takiyasha the Witch and the Skeleton Spectre

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takiyasha the witch and the skeleton spectre original

Artist: Utagawa Kuniyoshi

Title: Takiyasha the Witch and the Skeleton Specter from the Story of Utö Yasutaka

Date: c. 1843 - 1847

Details: More information...

Source: Honolulu Museum of Art Browse all 5,435 prints...

Description:

Utagawa Kuniyoshi (1798-1861), was famous for his experimentation with both native and Western styles, as well as for his depiction of history and legends. The scene appearing here is from a popular novel called the Story of Utö Yasutaka, written by Santö Kyöden (1761-1816) in 1807. After gaining magical powers from a mountain hermit, Princess Takiyasha, the legendary daughter of Taira Masakado (10th century), tried to form a conspiracy against her father’s killer. The gigantic skeleton portrayed here was a result of her newfound magical abilities. Kuniyoshi was believed to own a copy of a book that depicted Western anatomical drawings (kaitai shinsho); the skeleton demonstrates Kuniyoshi’s knowledge of anatomy. The panoramic composition lends powerful drama to the macabre image. "Imagination, Power Humor: The Art of Utagawa Kuniyoshi" 10/14/2010 - 12/19/2010 ****************************************

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Takiyasha the Witch and the Skeleton-Spectre

Takiyasha the Witch and the Skeleton-Spectre

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takiyasha the witch and the skeleton spectre original

Utagawa Kuniyoshi

takiyasha the witch and the skeleton spectre original

Victoria and Albert Museum

takiyasha the witch and the skeleton spectre original

Cromwell Road London, United Kingdom

The Skeleton Spectre is associated with the folklore figure of Gashadokuro, composed of the skeletons of people who do not receive proper burial rites.

The Skeleton Spectre is summoned by Princess Takiyasha, daughter of the historical samurai Taira no Masakado, who lived in the Heian period, about 1100 years ago.

More about Takiyasha the Witch and the Skeleton Spectre

H: 35 x W: 71 cm

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Kuniyoshi by Yuriko Iwakiri

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takiyasha the witch and the skeleton spectre original

Utagawa Kuniyoshi: The Edo-Period Eccentric by Christian Pallone

takiyasha the witch and the skeleton spectre original

Contributor

Utagawa Kuniyoshi's amazing Takiyasha the Witch and the Skeleton Spectre draws from traditional stories compiled by the Edo period writer Santō Kyōden, showing a scene set in Japan over one thousand years ago.

The story begins in the Heian period with Masakado, a member of the Taira clan, who leads a 59-day rebellion against Emperor Suzaku, the 61st emperor, as the leader of a bushi, or party. He makes the gutsy move of attacking other Taira, and the Emperor's men give him a thorough tail-whoopin', presenting his head to his people, who bury it in a fishing village which is today part of Tokyo. 

Masakado's daughter, Takiyasha , like a combination of Harry Potter, Natalie Portman in "Leon: The Professional," and Hamlet, comes back with a vengeance, guided by the spirit of her father and her animal familiar, the giant toad , who tutored her in the ancient esoteric arts. Her name, fittingly, means "waterfall demon princess," according to one translation, although the word "demon" would not have the same connotations that it does in English. In various parts of Japan, according to the Shinto faith, people revere Masakado in shrines, and his enshrinement was originally due to both respect for his honorable fighting and fear of his wrathful spirit. At one of his shrines, Kanda, people sell amulets which purport to protect computers and cell phones from crashing, losing data, and even from getting hacked. The Meiji Emperor once removed Masakado from Kanda shrine, because Masakado's a bit of an anti-government guy, but people missed him so much that they restored him to the shrine later on. Masakado has become a kami, an untranslatable word that refers to a divine, unseen spirit or soul that inspires awe, that uncanny, oceanic feeling in your spine which can be joy, fear, or both at the same time.

In this woodblock triptych of the ukiyo-e form, Kuniyoshi portrays a confrontation from Story of Utö Yasutaka by Kyöden, one of the first writers to make a living by writing fiction. According to the version of the same story in the two-hundred-year-old kabuki dance drama "Thieving Night when Love is Blind," Princess Takiyasha learned the magic of the giant toad, "passed down many centuries from the great magician Nikushisen." After a failed attempt to defeat him by seduction, Takiyasha confronts Mitsukuni, a representative of the Emperor, across the three panels, using her giant toad skills to summon the remains of untold numbers of people buried without proper rites , some of whom were casualties of war, others of whom ended up in mass graves after plagues. These lamenting, wandering spirits form like Voltron into Gashadokuro, a big, hungry, terrifying skeleton , harnessing the collective grief of the people to teach readers of the importance of giving a proper burial. Subsequently, riding into battle atop the giant toad, she loses the battle, as her father did, but she sure gives it her all. Like the horrifying stories of the Brothers Grimm, this work frightens us into keeping the boundaries instituted by tradition. Although Kuniyoshi's story is vintage, if you love video games, you've spent many an afternoon locked in a Manicheaen struggle with a "final boss," looming behind the two-dimensional tableau of your avatar's world with all the menace of this anatomically correct skeleton.

  • Brandon, James R., and Samuel L. Leiter. Kabuki Plays on Stage: Darkness and Desire, 1804-1864. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 2002.
  • Brandon, James R., and Samuel L. Leiter. Masterpieces of Kabuki: Eighteen Plays on Stage. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 2004.
  • "IT情報安全守護." Kandamyoujin, https://www.kandamyoujin.or.jp/sp/omamori/detail/?id=7 .
  • Kitagawa, Joseph Mitsuo. On Understanding Japanese Religion. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1987.
  • Kleinschmidt, Harald. Warfare in Japan. London: Routledge, 2017.
  • 刘立善, 沒有经卷的宗教: 日本神道. 厦门: 宁夏人民出版社, 2005 (Liu Lishan, Religion without Scriptures: Japanese Shinto. Xiamen, China: Ningxia People's Publishing House, 2005).
  • Markowitz, Judith A. Robots That Kill: Deadly Machines and Their Precursors in Myth, Folklore, Literature, Popular Culture and Reality. Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 2019.

takiyasha the witch and the skeleton spectre original

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Here is what Wikipedia says about Takiyasha the Witch and the Skeleton Spectre

takiyasha the witch and the skeleton spectre original

Takiyasha the Witch and the Skeleton Spectre or Mitsukuni Defying the Skeleton Spectre Invoked by Princess Takiyasha ( Japanese : 相馬の古内裏 妖怪がしゃどくろと戦う大宅太郎光圀 ) is an ukiyo-e woodblock triptych by Japanese artist Utagawa Kuniyoshi (1798–1861). Kuniyoshi was known for his depictions of historical and mythical scenes, and combined both in portraying the tenth-century princess Takiyasha summoning a skeleton spectre to frighten Ōya no Mitsukuni.

In the image, the princess recites a spell written on a handscroll , summoning a giant skeleton. It rears out of a black void, crashing its way through the tattered palace blinds with its bony fingers to menace Mitsukuni and his companion.

A copy of the print is housed in the Honolulu Museum of Art in the United States, having been donated by its previous owner, Victor S. K. Houston , in 1941.

Check out the full Wikipedia article about Takiyasha the Witch and the Skeleton Spectre

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Takiyasha the Witch and the Skeleton Spectre (1844)

takiyasha the witch and the skeleton spectre original

Full description

Artist: Utagawa Kuniyoshi

Dimensions: 37 x 25 cm (each sheet)

Color woodblock print

The giant skeleton that claims the center of attention in this print is terrifying, ominous, and an unusual sight in Edo woodblock prints, even ones depicting kaidankai, or tales of the mysterious. This skeleton, apart from its size, is mostly anatomically accurate. However, Kuniyoshi's addition of multiple excess rows of ribs adds to the disturbing affect this skeleton has on the viewer- and no doubt on the characters within the scene. It adds a layer of distortion to an otherwise accurate skeleton that can catch the viewer off guard and firmly establishes this spectre as a vehicle of fear. The void it arises from separates its existence from the more material world that the characters as well as the viewer are more familiar with. Instead of clouds separating the scene as is often seen in woodblock prints of this time, it is a fibery, paper-like rip that is just as much a tool of storytelling as it is a tear in the paper of the print itself, as a giant skeleton bursts out of its ink-bound world towards the viewer. This print encapsulates the terror of prints depicting popular kaidankai and how artists distort reality to invoke fear in the viewer.

https://www.britishmuseum.org/collection/object/A_1915-0823-0-915-916

  • created on March 13th, 2022
  • file format jpg
  • file size 183 KB
  • creator Utagawa Kuniyoshi

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About: Takiyasha the Witch and the Skeleton Spectre

Takiyasha the Witch and the Skeleton Spectre or Mitsukuni Defying the Skeleton Spectre Invoked by Princess Takiyasha (Japanese: 相馬の古内裏 妖怪がしゃどくろと戦う大宅太郎光圀) is an ukiyo-e woodblock triptych by Japanese artist Utagawa Kuniyoshi (1798–1861). Kuniyoshi was known for his depictions of historical and mythical scenes, and combined both in portraying the tenth-century princess Takiyasha summoning a skeleton spectre to frighten Ōya no Mitsukuni. A copy of the print is housed in the Honolulu Museum of Art, having been donated by its previous owner, Victor S. K. Houston, in 1941.

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MythBank

Gashadokuro: The Starving Skeleton Japanese Yokai

The Gashadokuro (がしゃどくろ / 餓者髑髏) appear in Japanese folklore as skeletal ghosts fifteen-times-the-size-of-a-normal-person.

They are claimed to be invincible, also having the power to become unseen at any time. The Gashadokuro are often described as wicked and enraged skeleton monsters.

Legend has it that Gashadokuro represent the revived skeleton bones of the soldier’s ghosts who died in battle but were never buried.

Other claims held that they emerged from the victims who lived in the poorer areas of Japan and who perished because of famine.

These persons were rarely accorded adequate burial ceremonies.

As a result, when the bones of hundreds of victims merge into one mass, they compose the monstrous skeleton of Gashadokuro.

Hence, the Gashadokuro is the result of mass mortality and the accumulation of hundreds of people’s agony.

Description of Gashadokuro

It is said that the souls of those who died, unable to pass on, are reborn as ghosts, roaming aimlessly and yearning for their lost lives. Their anguish and pain endure long after their flesh has rotted away from their bones.

Their rage festers into a grudge as their flesh disintegrates. This anger changes them into a supernatural entity roaming the earth in the form of a Gashadokuro.

Without the support of muscles or organic tissue, the skeleton of the Gashadokuro remains connected and functional through supernatural means.

However, its lack of musculature stops the Gashadokuro from walking normally. Gashadokuro continually twists and wriggles on the ground as its bone ensemble strives to keep up with its irregular movements.

Moreover, the Gashadokuro roam only after midnight, emerging from the shadows of gloom in search of human blood.

They will live on for generations after their “birth” until their anguish subsides, and this is not a process that can be accelerated before the Gashadokuro’s eventual disappearance.

The Origins of the Gashadokuro

The Gashadokuro is, in fact, a surreal depiction of a mythological being, first recorded over 1000 years ago.

The monstrous skeleton emerged during a bloody uprising against the central authority, led by a legendary samurai named Taira no Masakado.

Taira no Masakado and His Daughter

Taira no Masakado was an eastern Japanese Heian era provincial nobleman (gōzoku) and samurai. He was born in the late eighth or early ninth centuries CE and died in 940.

Taira no Masakado is best known for leading the first recorded rebellion against Kyto’s central authority, Ōya no Mitsukuni.

The rebellion was stifled in 939. Taira no Masakado was defeated and eventually decapitated.

It was Takiyasha-hime, Masakado’s daughter, a famed sorceress that carried up his cause after he was slain for his rebellion.

Princess Takiyasha remained to live at Masakado’s former dwelling, the ruined shōen, or rural manor-house, of the Sōma clan.

The accounts go on telling that she summoned a giant skeletal figure to strike Kyoto.

Some folks say that the giant skeleton continues haunting the region.

The apparition of the Gashadokuro in this historical instance may have been caused by the remains of the soldiers that accompanied Masakado to his death.

The storey was depicted in a famous woodblock artwork by an artist named Utagawa Kuniyoshi (1798–1861). The title of this woodblock is “Takiyasha the Witch and Skeleton Spectre” . It shows an early artistic portrayal of a colossal skeleton, such as the Gashadokuro.

Takiyasha the Witch and the Skeleton Spectre

Or Mitsukuni Defying the Skeleton Spectre Invoked by Princess Takiyasha ( 相馬の古内裏 妖怪がしゃどくろと戦う大宅太郎光圀 )

Kuniyoshi was well-known for his portrayals of historical and mythical themes. One of the portrayals depicts the tenth-century princess Takiyasha calling a skeleton phantom to terrorise Ōya no Mitsukuni.

The princess enacts a spell from a handscroll in the image, summoning a colossal skeleton. The depiction shows how the Gashadokuro tears a curtain wall apart, rearing from a black obliviousness and slamming its bony fingers through the tattered palace curtains, threatening Mitsukuni and his companion.

Ōya no Mitsukuni and another samurai are shown beneath the beast, dispatched by the emperor to search down the princess.

The Race of Gashadokuro

The Gashadokuro is classified as a ghost in the Yokai subtype, which the Japanese refer to as Yurei, a race of malevolent yokai found during Imperial Japan.

The term Youkai/Yokai/Yōkai (alternatively spelt “Yaoguai” in Chinese pinyin, the source of the Japanese word) literally means “bewitching spectres”. Therefore, the Yokai represent a vast array of numerous supernatural entities or phenomena that appear in Shinto mythology.

There are hundreds of different Yokai species, each with its own distinct type and subtype.

The species that belong under the Yurei subclass vary significantly in terms of their origin tales, appearance, behaviour, habitat, and other peculiar characteristics.

The Gashadokuro is a distinctive Yokai in these respects, and here’s why.

Characteristics

When the Gashadokuro is particularly angered, its entire skeletal frame lights up with fire. They also have sleek, extended tongues with which they sweep up human blood on occasion.

Oftentimes the Gashadokuro are depicted with several teeth missing.

Only the spinal cord and upwards are ever visible due to their immense size.

The inside of his skull is hollow, but the Gashadokuro have eyes, too. However, the pair of eyes may or may not be seen in the sockets of their skull. These eyes may be depicted as crimson, lit with fire, displaced, with each iris pointing in a different direction, constantly rolling around.

At times, a Gashadokuro is so angered that it is said to even go after other Yōkai.

Gashadokuro’s Sustenance

Gashadokuro regards humans as food, and it is only natural that he consumes what is contained within his body, frequently drinking their spraying blood. Once enraged, he will not stop until his victims’ life energy has been drained.

It then increases its body, assembling its victim’s bones, making it even larger and more terrifying.

In some depictions, to catch his prey, the Gashadokruo can create more skeletal arms.

Modern Depictions

The contemporary interpretations are based on Utagawa Kuniyoshi’s 1844 ukiyo-e print.

The first realistic depictions of the Gashadokuro as a massive skeleton in paper date back to the Shōwa era (1926 – 1989).

Gashadokuro yokai first appeared in print by shōnen magazine authors from 1960-1970 and illustrated yokai monsters’ encyclopedias.

  • Shigeaki Yamauchi’s World’s Bizarre Thriller Complete Works 2: World’s Monsters included it for the first time (Akita Shoten, 1968).
  • It was also included in Satō Aribumi’s Illustrated Encyclopedia of Japanese Yokai, published in 1972, and later in Shigeru Mizuki’s well-known series Gegege no Kitarō, published in 1985.

Satō Aribumi and Shigeru Mizuki are said to have been influenced by Utagawa Kuniyoshi’s ukiyo-e print.

Morihiro Saito, a Japanese writer, established the present depiction of Gashadokuro.

While giant skeletons were a fairly popular motif in ancient folktales, the majority of the Gashadokuro’s unique characteristics originate with Saito.

Both Arabumi’s 1972 Illustrated Encyclopedia of Japanese Yōkai and Mizuki’s depiction base the look of the Gashadokuro on the enormous skeleton in Utagawa Kuniyoshi’s ukiyo-e print.

While it was originally described as a collection of life-sized skeletons, Kuniyoshi portrayed it as a single massive skeleton, as is typical of his work.

Gashadokuro from Kanji: 餓者髑髏 , literally translates as “starving skeleton”, where 餓者 signifies “starving” and “髑髏” means “skeleton”—also known by 大髑髏, or O-dokuro, which directly translates to “huge skeleton”.

One of its base words is an onomatopoeia compounded with a definitive noun. Accordingly, “Gash” is derived from the onomatopoeic Japanese term “gachi gachi” which refers to a crunching, grinding, or rattling sound.

By combining it with the noun “odokuro,” a set of terms encompassing its fundamental meaning: a rattling, massive skeleton, is given. Due to its original narrative, it can also be interpreted as a “hungry skeleton”.

Questions About Gashadokuro

How can someone spot a gashadokuro’s presence.

Because of the citizenry’s desire for vengeance, the Gashadokuro prowl the streets after midnight, catching lone travellers and biting off their heads to suck their blood.

Their approach is signalled by the sound of rattling bones.

As a result of the predator’s bone-rattling, the victim will hear a loud ringing in their ear, warning them of their impending attack.

What happens if a person is attacked by the Gashadokuro?

If someone happens to be taken by surprise by the Gashadokuro, there will be no remorse.

The Gashadokuro approaches its target softly, grasps them with its bony hands, bites off their head, and drinks the blood spraying from the victim’s arteries.

How can one escape Gashadokuro’s attack?

If someone hears a Gashadokuro, their only chance of survival is to run to a safe spot and hide until daybreak, when the monster will vanish.

If their hiding place is not secured and the Gashadokuro detects them there, it will partially disintegrate itself, sending bones into those areas and murdering whoever hides there.

Can a Gashadokuro be killed?

Gashadokuro are too huge and powerful to kill, and hence they live, until all of the energy and malice stored in their bone mass is gone.

Due to its composition of previously departed humans’ bones, the Gashadokuro possesses invisibility and indestructibility.

Shinto charms are said to make them visible and thus ward them away.

Otherwise, the Gashadokuro will hunt until it has devoured all of its rage, crumbling to the ground or vanishing in the nothingness.

Where is does the Gashadokuro dwell?

The Gashadokuro prefers to roam fields at night or live in desolate places, such as battlegrounds, cemeteries, or mass graves. However, they can arise anywhere, at any time of the year.

As if being a giant skeleton wasn’t severe enough, the Gashadokuro is entirely invisible before it strikes.

The only way to know a Gashadokuro approach is to hear the sound of bells ringing in one’s ears just before it attacks.

As so, they will roam the countryside until the malice contained within their bodies dissipates.

Additional Information

Because anatomy studies in the Edo era were far less systematic than in Europe, the level of detail and accuracy Kuniyoshi achieved with his Gashadokuro skeleton is remarkable for its day.

Kuniyoshi has owned a copy of “The New Book of Anatomy,” or Kaitai Shinsho , a collection of 40 woodcut scientific illustrations by German physician Johann Adam Kulmus that was translated into Japanese by Edo physician and scholar Sugita Genpaku.

In Popular Culture

The Gashadokuro is a prominent character in modern video games and television shows. The Gashadokuro has recently been credited as the basis for characters such as Railroad Wrath in Cuphead and the Giant Skeletons in Dark Souls.

  • A Gashadokuro appears in the monster march segment of Studio Ghibli’s Pom Poko .
  • Gashadokuro was a significant opponent in the Ninja Sentai Kakuranger “Super Sentai” series. Gashadokuro comes here as a human-sized skeletal sword fighter and yokai commander. He can shift his size at will and is most frequently seen as Junior, a human punk rocker.
  • Gasha-Dokuro initially appears in Saishinban GeGeGe no Kitar , titled “ The Return of the Great Yōkai Gasha-Dokuro.” He was born out of the regret of the Aokigahara Forest’s suicide victims.
  • In Adventure Quest Worlds , the Gashadokuro is featured as the forbidden Beast of Chaos called the O-Dokuro. Kitsune uses the Hanzamune Blade to free it from a time rift.
  • Different forms of alien-like skeletons, mantis-like sickles, and lower bodies are featured in the 1985 anime and Saishinban.
  • In Goemon’s Great Adventure , a Gashadokuro is encountered at an early level while on a bridge.

Prior to their appearance in contemporary works or films, the Yōkai and other creatures from Japanese folklore were included in literature dating back to the Middle Ages.

Additionally, they were dubbed Mononoke , which translates as “supernatural person,” while the Kanji (妖 “yō”) in Yōkai translates as “calamity” or “mystery”.

The mythological framework of the Gashadokuro is based on people’s legends that date back more than 1000 years.

Its current upsurge derives from the triptych portrayal, which inspired modern-day depictions and woven urban legends in Japan.

It is frequently used as a basis for a few villains in anime shows or a wicked boss in video games.

Japanese Mythology Bibliography

  • Sokyo Ono – Shinto: The Kami Way
  • Marius B. Jansen – The Making of Modern Japan
  • Michael Dylan Foster, Shinonome Kijin – The Book of Yokai
  • Matt Clayton – Japanese Mythology

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Takiyasha the Witch and the Skeleton Spectre Print

  • Regular price $ 11.99

A beautiful reproduction of Takiyasha the Witch and the Skeleton Spectre which was a woodblock print by the Japanese artist Utagawa Kuniyoshi (1798-1861), who was especially renowned for his depictions of historical and mythical scenes. This print portrays tenth-century princess Takiyasha summoning a skeleton spectre to frighten Mitsukuni. The princess is reciting a spell written on a handscroll. She summons up a giant skeleton which comes rearing out of a terrifying black void, crashing its way through the tattered palace blinds with its bony fingers to menace Mitsukuni and his companion. Princess Takiyasha was the daughter of the provincial warlord Taira no Masakado who tried to set up an "Eastern Court" in Shimōsa Province, in competition with the emperor in Kyōto. However, his rebellion was put down in the year 939 and Masakado was killed. After his death, Princess Takiyasha continued living in the ruined palace of Sōma. This print shows the episode from the legend when the emperor's official, Ōya no Mitsukuni, comes to search for surviving conspirators.

All prints and posters are made to order on 11 by 17 inch professional heavyweight luster photo paper. All images are printed exactly as shown.

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Takiyasha the Witch and the Skeleton Spectre

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takiyasha the witch and the skeleton spectre original

Utagawa Kuniyoshi (1798-1861) was famous for his experimentation with both native and Western styles, as well as for his depiction of history and legends. The scene appearing here is from a popular novel called the Story of Utö Yasutaka, written by Santö Kyöden (1761-1816) in 1807. After gaining magical powers from a mountain hermit, Princess Takiyasha, the legendary daughter of Taira Masakado (10th century), tried to form a conspiracy against her father’s killer. The gigantic skeleton portrayed here was a result of her newfound magical abilities. Kuniyoshi was believed to own a copy of a book that depicted Western anatomical drawings (kaitai shinsho); the skeleton demonstrates Kuniyoshi’s knowledge of anatomy. The panoramic composition lends powerful drama to the macabre image. – Honolulu Museum of Art

SKU: 70469 Creator: Utagawa Kuniyoshi Date: c. 1843–1847 Original Medium: Woodblock print Location: Honolulu Museum of Art

Takiyasha the Witch and the Skeleton Spectre

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by: Utagawa Kuniyoshi - Honolulu Museum of Art

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Takiyasha the Witch and the Skeleton Spectre

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All orders are printed per order. Prints are shipped approximately 1 to 3 business days after order is placed.

Framed prints are shipped approximately 7-10 business days after order is placed.

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Item can be returned within 30 days or if damaged in shipping. For any items damaged in shipping, the shipping box must be retained in order for us to process a refund or exchange. View the full return policy .

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I was pleasantly surprised when my print arrived. The colors were vibrant and the image crisp and clean. Customer service was very responsive and friendly. I will be placing more orders in the future.

I can’t tell you how pleased I was with the quality, accuracy, and clarity. You far exceeded my expectations... so truly mirrors the original pleases me more than I can say.

I just received the Alex Coville canvas print. It arrived in perfect condition... Thank you for the excellent work.

We are delighted with our prints. They look gorgeous. The frames are very high quality.

takiyasha the witch and the skeleton spectre original

Art on Words

  • / Takiyasha the Witch and the Skeleton Spectre - Katsushika Hokusai

takiyasha the witch and the skeleton spectre original

Takiyasha the Witch and the Skeleton Spectre - Katsushika Hokusai

takiyasha the witch and the skeleton spectre original

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An extraordinary illustration printed on a vintage page of a Japanese encyclopedia from 1934. Each page is unique and has its particular flaws and signs of time. This series is a limited edition and our tribute to the fantastic art of Japanese illustration.    The page size: 26 cm x 18,4 cm  /  10,24 in x 7,24 in The print features  Takiyasha the Witch and the Skeleton Spectre by Katsushika Hokusai. About the print:

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takiyasha the witch and the skeleton spectre original

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takiyasha the witch and the skeleton spectre original

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IMAGES

  1. Takiyasha the Witch and the Skeleton Spectre

    takiyasha the witch and the skeleton spectre original

  2. Takiyasha the Witch and the Skeleton Spectre Painting by Utagawa

    takiyasha the witch and the skeleton spectre original

  3. Takiyasha the Witch and the Skeleton Spectre Postcard

    takiyasha the witch and the skeleton spectre original

  4. ArtStation

    takiyasha the witch and the skeleton spectre original

  5. Takiyasha the Witch and the Skeleton-Spectre

    takiyasha the witch and the skeleton spectre original

  6. Takiyasha the Witch and the Skeleton Spectre, Utagawa Kuniyoshi, 1844

    takiyasha the witch and the skeleton spectre original

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COMMENTS

  1. Takiyasha the Witch and the Skeleton Spectre

    Takiyasha the Witch and the Skeleton Spectre or Mitsukuni Defying the Skeleton Spectre Invoked by Princess Takiyasha ( Japanese: 相馬の古内裏 妖怪がしゃどくろと戦う大宅太郎光圀) is an ukiyo-e woodblock triptych by Japanese artist Utagawa Kuniyoshi (1798-1861).

  2. Why Utagawa Kuniyoshi was the Most Thrilling Ukiyo-e Master

    Takiyasha the Witch and the Skeleton Spectre, Woodblock Print by Utagawa Kuniyoshi The ukiyo-e movement, which bloomed in Japan between the 17th and 19th century, was one of the first times in Japanese history when art broke the bonds of social class and became something that appealed to the lowborn rather than just the aristocracy.

  3. triptych print

    Princess Takiyasha summoning a skeleton spectre to frighten Oya Taro Mitsukuni at her father Taira Masakado's ruined palace at Soma; Mitsukuni fending off the princess's henchman Araimaru, by sitting on Araimaru's sword and subduing him with a scabbard. Signed, sealed, marked and inscribed. Producer name Print artist: Utagawa Kuniyoshi 歌川国芳

  4. Takiyasha the Witch and the Skeleton Specter

    Takiyasha the Witch and the Skeleton Specter is an Edo Period Wood Block Print created by Utagawa Kuniyoshi from c. 1843 to 1847. It lives at the Honolulu Museum of Art in the United States. The image is in the Public Domain, and tagged Skulls, Ghosts, Witches and Skeletons.

  5. Takiyasha the Witch and the Skeleton Spectre

    19th century (made) This striking image illustrates the story of princess Takiyasha, daughter of warload Taira Masakado who started a rebellion against the court in Kyoto. As the rebellion failed and Masakado subsequently killed, the ghosts of soldiers who had fallen during the rebellion haunted Masakado's palace at Soma.

  6. Utagawa Kuniyoshi Ukiyo-e Visual & Historical Analysis

    Takiyasha the Witch and the Skeleton Spectre having been painted in 1843-47, and Kuniyoshi having passed away in 1861, before the Meiji Restoration, there is no way to say that the Shouwa Period held any context to the painting. However, when looking at the painting today, it can be interpreted in relation to the events of the 20th Century as ...

  7. File : Takiyasha the Witch and the Skeleton Spectre.jpg

    This is a retouched picture, which means that it has been digitally altered from its original version.Modifications: Stitched together.The original can be viewed here: Takiyasha the Witch and the Skeleton Spectre 3.jpg: .Modifications made by Crisco 1492.

  8. Takiyasha the Witch and the Skeleton Spectre

    Takiyasha the Witch and the Skeleton Spectre or Mitsukuni Defying the Skeleton Spectre Invoked by Princess Takiyasha is an ukiyo-e woodblock triptych by Japanese artist Utagawa Kuniyoshi . Kuniyoshi was known for his depictions of historical and mythical scenes, and combined both in portraying the tenth-century princess Takiyasha summoning a skeleton spectre to frighten Ōya no Mitsukuni.

  9. Utagawa Kuniyoshi: Takiyasha the Witch and the Skeleton Specter from

    Artist: Utagawa Kuniyoshi Title: Takiyasha the Witch and the Skeleton Specter from the Story of Utö Yasutaka Date: c. 1843 - 1847 Details: More information... Source: Honolulu Museum of Art Browse all 5,435 prints... Description: Utagawa Kuniyoshi (1798-1861), was famous for his experimentation with both native and Western styles, as well as for his depiction of history and legends.

  10. Takiyasha the Witch and the Skeleton-Spectre

    Takiyasha the Witch and the Skeleton-Spectre Artist: Utagawa Kuniyoshi (Japanese, 1797 - 1861) Date: ca. 1844 Medium: Color woodblock print, oban triptych Dimensions: Image: 14 3/8 x 29 7/8 in. (36.5125 x 75.8825 cm) Credit Line: Gift of Yellow Freight System, Inc. Object number: F90-12/18 In Collection (s) East Asian Art Terms Japanese Prints

  11. Japan's Giant Skeleton Art Is Based On A Fascinating Story

    Japan's Giant Skeleton Art Is Based On A Fascinating Story — The Modern Rogue Art History It is said that life imitates art, but when giant skeletons are involved it gets a bit more complicated.

  12. Takiyasha the Witch and the Skeleton Spectre

    Utagawa Kuniyoshi's amazing Takiyasha the Witch and the Skeleton Spectre draws from traditional stories compiled by the Edo period writer Santō Kyōden, showing a scene set in Japan over one thousand years ago.

  13. Category:Takiyasha the Witch and the Skeleton Spectre, by Utagawa

    Media in category "Takiyasha the Witch and the Skeleton Spectre, by Utagawa Kuniyoshi". The following 15 files are in this category, out of 15 total. Kuniyoshi Takiyasha the Witch print.jpg 720 × 362; 79 KB. Kuniyoshi Utagawa, a men.jpg 1,944 × 2,929; 1.06 MB. Kuniyoshi Utagawa, Sceleton.jpg 3,920 × 2,881; 1.8 MB.

  14. Takiyasha the Witch and the Skeleton Spectre (1844)

    Artist: Utagawa Kuniyoshi Dimensions: 37 x 25 cm (each sheet) Color woodblock print The giant skeleton that claims the center of attention in this print is terrifying, ominous, and an unusual sight in Edo woodblock prints, even ones depicting kaidankai, or tales of the mysterious. This skeleton, apart from its size, is mostly anatomically accurate. However, Kuniyoshi's addition of multiple ...

  15. About: Takiyasha the Witch and the Skeleton Spectre

    Takiyasha the Witch and the Skeleton Spectre or Mitsukuni Defying the Skeleton Spectre Invoked by Princess Takiyasha (Japanese: 相馬の古内裏 妖怪がしゃどくろと戦う大宅太郎光圀) is an ukiyo-e woodblock triptych by Japanese artist Utagawa Kuniyoshi (1798-1861). Kuniyoshi was known for his depictions of historical and mythical scenes, and combined both in portraying the ...

  16. Gashadokuro: The Starving Skeleton Japanese Yokai

    The storey was depicted in a famous woodblock artwork by an artist named Utagawa Kuniyoshi (1798-1861). The title of this woodblock is "Takiyasha the Witch and Skeleton Spectre". It shows an early artistic portrayal of a colossal skeleton, such as the Gashadokuro. Takiyasha the Witch and the Skeleton Spectre

  17. Takiyasha the Witch and the Skeleton Spectre

    If you can pick out any samples, comment below!The historical Princess Takiyasha was the daughter of the provincial warlord Taira no Masakado of Sōma, who tr...

  18. Dark Japanese Music

    🎧 Album | Tales of Japan 🎧 Apple Music : http://bit.ly/talesofjapanapple Spotify : http://bit.ly/talesofjapanspotify Amazon : http://bit.ly/talesofjapanama...

  19. Takiyasha and the Witch and the Skeleton Spectre

    Takiyasha and the Witch and the Skeleton Spectre. Utagawa Kuniyoshi, the Japanese artist, was famous for his depictions of history and legends. The scene shown here is from a popular novel called the Story of Uto Yasutaka, that was written by Santo Kyoden in 1807. Princess Takiyasha was the daughter of the warlord Taira no Masakado who started ...

  20. Takiyasha the Witch and the Skeleton Spectre Print

    A beautiful reproduction of Takiyasha the Witch and the Skeleton Spectre which was a woodblock print by the Japanese artist Utagawa Kuniyoshi (1798-1861), who was especially renowned for his depictions of historical and mythical scenes. This print...

  21. Takiyasha the Witch and the Skeleton Spectre

    SKU: 70469 Creator: Utagawa Kuniyoshi Date: c. 1843-1847 Original Medium: Woodblock print Location: Honolulu Museum of Art Takiyasha the Witch and the Skeleton Spectre Loading Favorites by: Utagawa Kuniyoshi - Honolulu Museum of Art SEE OUR 2023 HOLIDAY SHIPPING GUIDELINES Not currently available for purchase.

  22. Takiyasha the Witch and the Skeleton Spectre

    Printable Japanese Fine Wall Art Vintage Decor Ukiyo-E Skeleton by Utagawa Takiyasha Edo Period Takiyasha the Witch and the Skeleton Spectre. $5.99. Takiyasha the Witch and the Skeleton Spectre Mouse Mat Mousepad. High Quality Japanese Woodblock Art Mouse Pad Gift. (1.1k) $13.88.

  23. Takiyasha the Witch and the Skeleton Spectre

    An extraordinary illustration printed on a vintage page of a Japanese encyclopedia from 1934. Each page is unique and has its particular flaws and signs of time.This series is a limited edition and our tribute to the fantastic art of Japanese illustration. The page size:26 cm x 18,4 cm / 10,24 in x 7,24 inThe print