jamaican dancing

jamaican dancing

Are you ready to add some groove to your dance moves? Get your body moving with the vibrant, upbeat rhythms of Jamaican dancing! In this blog post, we’ll explore the history, culture, and styles of Jamaican dancing. So put on your favorite reggae beats and get ready to learn some new moves!

What is Jamaican dancing called?

Jamaican dancing is a popular and exciting form of expressive movement that dates back hundreds of years. There are many types of traditional Jamaican dances, such as the tambu dance, ettu dance, bruckin’ party and rocksteady. These dances were traditionally performed to celebrate important holidays and special occasions. The tambu dance takes its name from the drum referred to as “tambu” and is performed mainly for entertainment with couples facing and moving towards each other. Ettu dance is a religious practice of the Nigerian migrants who first came to Jamaica as indentured servants. It is danced in individual worship and praise. Bruckin’ Party was originally performed to celebrate holidays while Rocksteady evolved from ska in the late 1960’s with a corresponding new dance called “the ska”. Jamaican traditional dances fall roughly into three categories: African derived, European derived and Creole, that is, a mixture of both African and European influences.

How do Jamaican people dance?

How do Jamaican people dance?

Jamaicans are known for their unique and energetic style of dancing. Dancehall, a popular genre of music in Jamaica, is a combination of various styles such as bruckins, burru, dinki-minni and daggering. The dance is often characterized by jumping slightly off the ground and landing with one foot directly in front of the other. Women typically dance more subtly than men, often standing erect with angular movements while remaining barefoot. Men also remain barefoot to better connect with their ancestors and the earth. Rocksteady and reggae music eventually evolved from ska in the late 1960s, resulting in a new dance called “the ska” that is still popular today. Jamaican Dancehall also includes people jumping from high places as well as other energetic moves that make it more exciting to watch.

What is the most popular dance in Jamaica?

The most popular dance in Jamaica is the Bruckins, a traditional dance that is part of a creolised group of dances. It was originally used to celebrate the anniversary of Emancipation from slavery on August 1st, and still retains its popularity today. Other traditional Jamaican dances include Kumina, Quadrille, Burru, Dinki-Minni, Ettu, Gerreh and Gumbay. The style of Quadrille originates from the popular dance Rocksteady which eventually evolved into reggae and ska. The accompanying dance to the ska genre was called “the ska” which is still danced today and has become increasingly popular with Jamaicans.

Introduction to Jamaican Dance

Introduction to Jamaican Dance is an exploration of the rich and vibrant dance forms that are deeply rooted in Jamaica’s cultural heritage. Jamaican dance is a mix of African, European, and Creole influences that have been blended together to create timeless and unique styles. From Myal, which has been around since the days of colonization, to modern Reggae Wednesdays during Reggae Month, there’s a variety of traditional dances to discover. Quadrille and Bruckins are two popular ballroom set dances that originated in Europe but were adapted by Jamaicans during slavery. Then you have the urban moves like burru and dinki-minni which were incorporated into defining Dancehall culture. From high energy hip-swinging Mento bands to promenades with more footwork, Jamaican dance forms are sure to keep your toes tapping!

Reggae and Ska Dancing

Reggae and ska dancing are two popular dance styles that originated in Jamaica. Reggae is a style of music that developed in the late 1960s and is closely associated with Jamaican culture. Ska, on the other hand, is a genre of music that emerged from Jamaican mento and R&B during the 1950s. Both genres are upbeat, energetic styles of dance that have become popular around the world.

The Bogle is one of the most popular moves associated with reggae and ska dancing. It involves crossing one arm over another while swaying to the beat of the music. The move is also known as “the wiggle” or “the jerk” and can be seen performed at many clubs across Jamaica.

Reggae Wednesdays became popular among Jamaicans during Reggae Month in 2020, when singers such as Jimmy Cliff used a song called “Skadoreno” by Bluebeat Makers FOLLOW to create fun dance classes using ska music. The fast-paced rhythms of ska make it an ideal style for dancing, allowing dancers to perform a variety of complex moves and spins to the beat without missing a step.

Overall, reggae and ska dancing are both enjoyable forms of expression that allow people to release their energy onto the dance floor and interact with others through movement. Whether it’s an intimate gathering or a large-scale event, these two genres always bring people together for an unforgettable experience!

Mento and Calypso Dancing

Mento and Calypso Dancing

Mento and Calypso Dancing are popular traditional dances originating from Jamaica. Mento is a type of Jamaican country folk dance while Calypso is a combination of Caribbean Mento, R&B, Swing, Boogie-Woogie and early Rock & Jazz. The two styles have influenced each other over the years to create classic Ska music which demands that you move your body!

The Bruckins party is a stately, dipping-gliding dance typified by the “thrust and recovery” action of the hip and leg and was often performed in Jamaica in the past. Quadrille also originated from the popular dance of the French and English in Jamaica.

In early 1960s Ska was very influential in Jamaica as it combined Mento and Calypso with other genres such as R&B, Jazz and Rhythm & Blues. This created an infectious sound which inspired many legendary musicians such as Toots Hiberts. During Reggae Month 2020, Pressure Sounds released an album called Reggae Wednesdays to celebrate these iconic musical styles.

Mento and Calypso Dancing have been around for centuries but continue to be enjoyed today at parties or on the dance floor!

The History of Jamaican Dance

Jamaican dance has a long and rich history, spanning back to the days of slavery and emancipation. Myal is one of the oldest dances in Jamaica, associated with a type of religious observance. In anticipation of Jamaica’s independence from Britain, the late 1950s saw the emergence of street dance culture in Jamaica. Traditional Jamaican dances can be divided into three categories: African derived, European derived, and Creole (a mixture of both). Examples include Kumina, which originated in Congo and was brought to Jamaica by free Africans; Ettu Dance, a religious practice of Nigerian migrants; and Mento, the original popular music form that developed during the plantation period. Each traditional Jamaican dance has its own distinctive sound and style that celebrates the island’s vibrant culture.

Raggamuffin and Dub Step Dancing

Raggamuffin and Dub Step Dancing

Raggamuffin and Dub Step Dancing are two popular dance styles that originated in Jamaica. Raggamuffin is a style of reggae music featuring a heavy bassline, drum machine beats and rap-style vocals. Dub Step is a combination of dancehall, hip hop, dub and techno music with a faster tempo and heavier basslines. Both styles are popular at Reggae Month festivities held in Jamaica every January, where people can experience the unique sound of these two distinct musics. Dancehall fans appreciate the energy of Raggamuffin while Dub Step enthusiasts enjoy the fusion between different genres. With its infectious rhythms and easy-to-follow moves, both styles offer an exciting way to get your groove on!

Traditional African Dance Styles in Jamaica

Traditional African Dance Styles in Jamaica

Traditional African dance styles have been present in Jamaica since the island’s early colonial days. These styles, including Bruckins, Dinki Mini/Minnie Gerreh, Quadrille and Mento, were passed down through generations of slaves and free people of African descent.

Bruckins is an African-Jamaican traditional creole dance that was originally performed to celebrate important events such as weddings and baptisms. It usually involves two lines of people dancing opposite each other in a circle formation with clapping and singing.

Dinki Mini/Minnie Gerreh is a type of dance generally associated with wakes and burials. It is often accompanied by an African drumbeat and involves participants jumping high into the air while clapping their hands above their heads. The movements are said to symbolize joy despite the solemn occasion.

Quadrille is a European-style ballroom dance that was popular among the gentry during slavery times in Jamaica. It has been adapted over time to incorporate traditional Jamaican music rhythms. This four-couple set dance typically follows a pattern where couples move through various formations before meeting back at the middle for an ending sequence.

Mento is Jamaica’s original popular music form which developed during plantation times. Accompanied by guitars, banjos, fiddles, maracas and other instruments, Mento songs are often chanted or sung in patois over an upbeat tempo – making it distinctly Jamaican! The dances accompanying Mento include grinding hips as well as skips and jumps across the floor similar to Bruckins’ movements.

All these traditional folk dances remain popular today; they’re regularly performed at festivals throughout Jamaica

The Influence of Latin American Styles on Jamaican Dance

Jamaican dance is an eclectic mix of styles from around the world, but none has had as much influence as Latin American dance. From the Ballroom Style to Camp Style and Jamaica’s Heritage in Dance & Music, there are many aspects of Latin American culture that have been embraced by Jamaican dancers. The Revival ritual that is still popular today incorporates singing, drumming, dancing, hand-clapping, foot-stomping and groaning along with the music. Latin American styles have also inspired a great deal of dancehall and reggae music in Jamaica.

The influence of Latin America on Jamaican dance dates back to the colonial period when slaves brought over their own cultural traditions such as Calypso music from Trinidad and Puerto Rico. This type of music was adapted to create a unique sound called Mento music that became popular throughout Jamaica in the early 20th century.

In addition to traditional Latin American dances such as Salsa and Merengue which can be seen performed on Jamaican streets or at parties, modern forms like Reggaeton have found their way into Jamaica’s vibrant nightlife scene. These genres are often fused with traditional Caribbean elements like Soca and Chutney creating hybrid styles unique to the island.

Latin American style has been a major part of Jamaican culture for centuries and continues to evolve into new forms today. From its roots in traditional African dances to its modern influences from across the globe, it’s no wonder why Jamaicans embrace this vibrant culture so enthusiastically!

Popular Dances in Jamaica

Jamaica is home to a variety of traditional and modern dances that range from African-derived, European-derived, and Creole. The most popular dance in Jamaica is the Kumina, which originated in West Africa. This dance style is predominantly found in the parishes of St Mary and St Catherine. The Quadrille is a partnered dance that was danced during slavery. It later evolved into the popular ska dance, which later became rocksteady and reggae around the late 1960s. Another popular Jamaican dance is Bruckins, Burru, Dinki-minni, Ettu, Gerreh, Gumbay, Jonkunnu, Maypole, Myal and Zella. All these dances are unique to Jamaica with each having its own style and flair that make them fun to watch or participate in.

Learn the Moves

Learning the moves of Jamaican dancehall and reggae music is a great way to have fun and stay active. With its pulsating rhythms, exciting choreography, and vibrant culture, it’s no wonder that Jamaican dance is so popular around the world. From traditional African roots to modern urban styles, there are many different ways to enjoy this fun form of exercise. Whether you’re looking for a fun dance party or just want to get in shape, learning how to move your body like a real Jamaican is sure to be an unforgettable experience!

Start by getting familiar with the basics of Jamaican dancehall and reggae music. Learn about different types of moves such as “Thumbs Up” and “The Bogle”. Practice these steps at home or join a class in your area that will teach you more about the style. As you become more comfortable with the moves, challenge yourself by trying out new combinations or even creating your own unique style. And don’t forget: have fun! With so many amazing possibilities when it comes to Jamaican dancehall and reggae music, you can always find something new to learn and explore – just make sure you let loose and enjoy it along the way!

Practice Makes Perfect!

Practice makes perfect is an age-old phrase that is true in many aspects of life, and dancing is certainly no exception. With dedication and regular practice, anyone can learn to dance. Jamaican dance steps are particularly enjoyable, with a variety of styles ranging from traditional folk dances to modern club moves. With proper instruction, practice and determination, anyone can learn to perform these fun and energetic moves. From twerking to the latest TikTok trends, Jamaican dance steps offer something for everyone. So what are you waiting for? Get up and get moving; practice makes perfect!

In conclusion, Jamaican dance has evolved over the years from its Afro-Caribbean roots to become a unique and vibrant form of expression. From Mento and Ska to Reggae and Dancehall, each genre has its own special flavor that reflects the culture of Jamaica. This rich heritage is reflected in the innovative moves of urban dancehall dancers, as well as traditional spiritual dances such as Myal. As a nation, Jamaica has had an immense impact on music and dance around the world—a legacy that continues to thrive today.

Get back to basics: Learn the iconic moves that define dancehall

For edz gyamfi, dance is all about culture. let him lead you in a lesson on the move: season ii.

jamaican dance bogle

Social Sharing

Edmund "Edz" Gyamfi is a dancer and choreographer born in Kumasi, Ghana and raised in Ottawa. He shares his infectious charm and some iconic dancehall moves by Bogle in The Move: Season II.

For Edz Gyamfi, dance is a lot bigger than just movements. "Steps are just steps. Being able to not only understand the movements but understanding the culture and really immersing yourself in the culture is everything." And he did just that when he began learning the roots of dancehall from a Jamaican dance crew based in Ottawa. 

One thing I really appreciated about Bogle growing up is that Bogle created movement that your mom, your uncle, your little sister, your auntie could do. It's very communal. - Edz Gyamfi on dancehall icon Gerald "Bogle" Levy

In this episode, Edz grooves us through two classic dancehall moves: "Back to Basics," from dancehall icon Bogle, and "Easy Does It," a CariUrban move by Jack Judson. Gerald "Bogle" Levy was seen as an innovator in the Jamaican dance scene — a legend who many credit as creating infectious dance moves that simultaneously influenced the music and helped commercialize dancehall culture on a global scale.

Dancehall originated as a popular form of music in the 70s in Jamaica but expanded into something much greater than that where music, dance, fashion, politics and culture coalesce. Edz immersed himself in all of it — and now when he dances, he feels liberated.

Follow Edz Gyamfi here .

Eight of Canada's top choreographers share their astonishing moves — and the incredible stories behind why they dance in The Move: Season II.  Find out more  and stream the full series now  on CBC Gem.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

jamaican dance bogle

Lucius Dechausay is a video producer at CBC Arts, as well as a freelance illustrator and filmmaker. His short films and animations have been screened at a number of festivals including The Toronto International Film Festival and Hot Docs. Most recently he directed KETTLE, which is currently streaming at CBC Short Docs.

Related Stories

  • The Move 8 top choreographers share their astonishing moves and the incredible stories behind why they dance
  • The Move Dance is how Nico Archambault found his confidence as a shy kid — now he's a superstar
  • The Move Can you dance after breaking both your legs? Santee Smith healed through ballet and Indigenous dance
  • The Move Brave enough to be seen: She's 52, queer, a mother — and now she's bringing that all onstage
  • The Move After dancing for Rihanna and Drake, Esie Mensah is answering the call of her ancestors
  • The Move How far would you go to be the best? This choreographer uses a sports mindset to push his dancers
  • The Move She was told she couldn't be a Bharatanatyam dancer — now she's reinventing it
  • The Move Making the impossible possible: Choreographer Heidi Strauss is breaking the boundaries of dance
  • African Research

African Research Consult

  • Search for:
  • 🌿Traditional Medicine
  • ⛪Traditional Religion
  • 🗳️Political History
  • Tribe Origins
  • 🌎 Pan-Africanism

The Assassination of Legendary Dancehall Dance Pioneer Gerald Bogle Levy

jamaican dance bogle

Gerald Bogle Levy better known as Bogle and also as Bogle Dancer, Mr Bogle, Father Bogle and Mr Wacky, was a Jamaican dancehall star, dancer and choreographer . 

Beenie Man (one of the dancehall legends from the early 90s) called Bogle “the greatest dancer of all time” and recognised as “part of the foundation and as an icon inside of dancehall culture.” 

Bogle created more dancehall moves than any other figure, he is best known for creating the Bogle dance which is named after him. 

He created the Willie Bounce (named after his own friend and Black Roses Crew member Willie Haggart), Wacky Dip, Urkle Dance, Sesame Street, Bogle Dance, Pelper, LOY, Jerry Springer, Zip It Up, Hotti Hotti Bogle, World Dance, Pop Yuh Collar, Row di Boat, Out and Bad, Sweeper, Stuckie, and many other popular dances.

His stage name, Bogle, is a reference to Paul Bogle a National Hero of Jamaica ( a Baptist deacon and activist of the 1860s who was hanged on 24th October 1865 by the British colonial government)

Levy began his career performing dance moves to disco music.

He claimed that his occupation was nurtured, curiously, through the espousal of the renowned Jamaican poet Louise Bennett.

He stated that it was through Bennett’s ( a woman ) support of the arts that inspired him to became recognised as Jamaica’s leading creator of new dances. 

jamaican dance bogle

Through his admiration of the Jamaican national hero Paul Bogle, and his love of dancehall, Levy created the ‘Bogle Dance’ in 1992.

The dance led to a series of hits endorsing the moves, notably Buju Banton’s ‘Bogle Dance’ and Ninjaman’s ‘Gun Bogle’. 

The success of Levy’s ragga rumbas led to an international tour, which included an appearance on UK television’s infamous music programme, The Word. 

The dance remained popular throughout 1993 and further releases supported the dance including the release of Bogle Mania Xterminator Versus Junjo, that featured Capleton, Tumpa Lion, General T.K. , Yellowman and Shaka Shamba. 

Through the Bogle dance Levy gained notoriety and inspired the producers to create new rhythms with his dance moves in mind. 

jamaican dance bogle

Routines included Sly And Robbie’s ‘Mission Impossible’, as well as the ‘Hot 97’ rhythm inspired by the New York-based radio show and a remake of ‘Bogle Dance’ called the ‘Pelpa Dance’. 

At Sting ’97, for news on the latest dancehall moves, Levy and his crew were widely courted by the media. 

His moves led to claims that he helped promote the careers of a number of Jamaican performers and inspired hits such as ‘All Fruits Ripe’ (Junior Reid) and ‘Tink Mi Nice’ (Frisco Kid). 

In 1999, Levy demonstrated that he was still streetwise when he introduced the Jerry Springer dance, also referred to as (L.O.Y.) Lords Of Yard. 

Mr. Bogle has maintained a high profile in the dancehall and by 2000 embarked on a career as a performer in his own right.

Mysteriously Shot by Unknown Assailants  

On 20th January 2005 he was killed in a drive-by shooting in Kingston, Jamaica (The Tupac way).

The famous dancer was at a gas station (around 2am) when two men on a motorbike sped passed by and allegedly shot into his vehicle that also had three passengers.

The four were rushed to a hospital, but 40-year-old Levy died at the Kingston Public Hospital at age 40.

The three others — including a 16-year-old boy — are listed in serious condition.

Following Levy’s death, the Kingston home of John Hype, a rival of Levy, was burned to the ground.

Levy was major influence on breakout artists such as Elephant Man and Beenie Man.

Beenie Man who was blamed for his murder posted a $1 million reward for the apprehension of the shooters.

What Really Happened?

According to detailed police report, “Bogle” together with four other persons were traveling in his F150 van on Constant Spring Road, Kingston 10 on Thursday, January 20 at about 2:35 a.m., when they stopped at a service station on Constant Spring Road.

While there, two men armed with handguns rode up on a grey Honda F4 motor bike and opened fire, hitting all five who were in the vehicle. 

They were taken to the hospital where Levy was pronounced dead and three others admitted in serious condition.

A fourth person was treated and released.

4 days later, one of the men shot during the incident who was admitted in serious condition, died. 

He was identified as Tony Reid aka “Matterhorn” (not the sound system selector).

Note that Bogle was a founding member of Black Roses Crew of Lincoln Crescent (Roses Corner) in Kingston 13. 

Its members included community leader William “Wille Haggart” Moore, David “Ice” Smith, Michael Stewart, and Lonsdale “Boysie” Guy.

Moore and Smith met similar fate in 2001 and 2008, respectively (again just like what happened to Tupac and his circle of friends).

“All dem deh, whey all dem did deh? Cause mi a straight weddy weddy, mi not a lean weddy weddy”

These lyrics are excerpts from the late dancehall icon Bogle’s controversial lyrics said to be at the heart of the heated arguments between himself and rival dancer John Hype, who responded with: 

 “Yuh ready? How dem sey dem ready, dem nuh ready ’cause dem a par wid Freddy. A wha duh yuh? A wha duh yuh cookie monster an yuh crew?”

Their ongoing feud dated back to 2004.

Reports from several fans in Jamaica and abroad revealed that physical showdowns and word dropping had taken place between the two dance crews at several dancehall events as they grumbled about “who better than who, who bring who, who done and who a mek more money and dress better than who.”

“Dem wet up dem one anodda, drop wud, even bax dung, kick dung and spit pon gwaan between the followers,” one female fan close to the wrangling reported.

Some Jamaicans also blamed a popular sound system operator for causing the fiery rift between the two dancers, by breeding it and encouraging it at his weekly events.

There were reports of a conflict that took place at Standpipe (night club and music center) in 2004 in which female fans of Beenie Man had verbal arguments with a member of Bogle’s entourage who threw Guinness at them, which caught Beenie Man on the hand. 

It is alleged that another member of Bogle’s camp talked it over with the DJ. 

However, trusted reports from Jamaican streets revealed that by the time they returned to Black Roses, two men, one armed with a rifle and the other a shotgun, opened fire on them. 

Recognising the men, Beenie Man was called and he was reportedly upset that the men from a section of the community had taken it up on themselves to retaliate. 

A meeting was called and the matter quelled.

In another instance, it was reported that at a popular Monday night session, there was a confrontation between Bogle and John Hype’s dancers. 

Men from Bogle’s corner went around to John Hype’s corner. 

Things got physical and punches were thrown. 

Allegations are that one man from Hype’s corner went to a nearby street for a gun and was on his way back when he was held by the police. 

Bogle and Hype were not involved in that brawl.

The night of Wednesday, January 19, 2005, turned out to be a fatal one. 

One eyewitness, a member of Bogle’s crew, reports that there was no confrontation between Bogle, John Hype or any member of the crew at the popular Weddy Weddy night in Kingston that night.

“The only argument whey tek place a between Beenie Man footballer bredda and Kid Kurrupt. 

Mi know sey di man dem inna Beenie Man camp did vex when wi let out the two fowls from inside a suitcase. 

The black fowl whey have on the bead on the top of him head fly go over whey Beenie Man stand up and everybody start laugh.

Beenie Man wasn’t amused as him face did ben’ up. Mi jus’ step out a di crowd and observe whey a gwaan,” he said.

It is understood that followers of Beenie Man took offence at the fact that Bogle had brought the fowls to the dance, and the implication was made as to who the fowls represented.

Some considered it disrespect and even vented anger at Bogle.

The eyewitness said that for a while he did not know where Bogle had turned until a man brought two six-packs of Guinness and Bogle instructed to

distribute them.

“Mi nuh know if a dat time him an anybody get inna nuh argument and him woulda sey supp’n to a man, yuh see mi,” the eyewitness said.

He went on to say that, “Beenie Man and his followers were the first to leave the venue and Bogle said him not going anywhere until him ready to go to Passa Passa where he was planning to do the same fowl thing.”

Bogle and a van load of followers later left Weddy Weddy heading for Passa Passa when Bogle realised that he was low on gas and stopped at the Esso gas station on Constant Spring Road. 

Bogle was sitting in the passenger side of his F150 vehicle driven by one of his colleagues.

What Did The Driver Say After The Shooting? 

The driver of the vehicle said: 

 “Bogle go inna him pocket and come up wid a $500 and sey “a ongle this mi have inna mi pocket.” Him hand mi the $500 and push him hand inna him pocket again and come up wid $100 whey him push back in him pocket and say a it alone him have. 

“Him did give me $2,000 to hold on to at Weddy Weddy. 

A it him teck and buy the Guinness. 

A entertainer did deh pon the pump so Bogle come out a di van and guh stand up unda di shed inna di gas station.

Meanwhile mi a wait pon di entertainer fi come off when mi see a bike ride up and a man in a helmet reach fi him waist and start opening fire on Bogle. 

As mi back up fi use the vehicle and drive dung pon him, mi only hear a shot and feel supp’n lick mi inna mi head back and tun roun fi see a man a aim a gun at mi head. 

All mi coulda do is drive the vehicle up in a corner and jump through the window and run go ova through Pavilion and run fi mi life. 

When mi a run, mi see a nex’ yute a run and the gunman shot him inna him back and him drop.”

As news of Bogle’s death spread far and wide, persons who knew of the ongoing feud, and who were at Weddy Weddy, immediately linked the death to Beenie Man and John Hype because of previous friction.

The burning of the premises at 12 Dillon Road belonging to John Hype’s parents is considered retaliation for Bogle’s death (happened few hours after the shooting).

Bogle’s mother Dorothy Smith, affectionately called Mama May, said this after the death of her son:

 “A Bogle buy [everything], up to mi panty fi mi. 

Mi leave everything to God and mi doan want nobody sorry fi mi. 

God is my revenge and no amount a money whey dem a put up naw bring back mi pickney. 

Same way people know di names a the two man, and since a dem friend and dem doan know nutten ’bout mi pickney death, dem fi just come clean and give up the man dem.

“When mi hear Beenie Man pon TV a talk ’bout a nuff people waan kill Bogle, him need fi talk who is dem nuff people deh. 

Bogle nuh nyammy nyammy. A mi cook him food still. 

A Tuesday (day before he was killed) mi cook beef and food fi him.”

Mama May sat back and lamented on the good relationship she had with her son.

According to Mama May, “A waiting on some family members abroad to come in for the funeral and February 6 is the most likely time. I’ve already gotten the go ahead from the MP to lay the body in state at the Tony Spaulding Complex.”

On Sunday at a candlelight church vigil being held at Black Roses corner, another of Bogle’s colleagues told XtraNews that, “Bogle did a prepare fi see dem do a counteraction, dress up two black Doberman dogs inna chain and sey a him. Him sey all him woulda do a jus deejay sey, ‘Mi a di ongle dawg wid di bark roun’ here, walk and dance roun here.’ Jah know sey a so Bogle stay. Him just love them things deh.”

After the death of Bogle, Dancehall was in limbo as nobody knew why Bogle was gunned down, nobody on the street revealed who really killed him, or if, when and where reprisals will take place.

As a result of what happened on that fateful night, and the uncertainty of what will happen next, the police encouraged promoters of street dances and weekly sessions in certain areas to desist from hosting these events until further notice.

Whether these events were still being kept or not would have been redundant, as following the incident many dancehall patrons stayed home, very few brave enough to venture out.

Beenie Man Clears Himself Again! 

In 2020 Beenie Man once again denied allegations that he was involved in the death of Gerald “Bogle” Levy.

During a recent interview with YouTube Vlogger, Teach Dem, Beenie Man said even though they had beef he still considered Bogle a friend.

jamaican dance bogle

“Bogle ah me fren, ah mi bredrin, me and him born di same day…me and Bogle never have an argument, Bogle just end up ah disrespect me cause him ah par wid Eleman Fant” He said.

According to the Doc, the night when Bogle died, he was in an argument with dancehall artiste Kid Kurrupt who had disrespected Beenie Man’s brother Brian.

They however went home and it was 2 hours after reaching home his security personnel advised him of Bogle’s death.

“Me could never harm mi fren cause ah still me fren regardless ah whey you do, as long as you nuh hurt me, you nuh try fi harm me, you nuh try fi harm my family.” Beenie Man added.

Those behind his death have NEVER been found! 

Dancehall Music and Violence

Dancehall music had its genesis in the political turbulence of the late 1970s and became Jamaica’s dominant music in the 1980s and ’90s.

It was a music genre which grew out of Reggae (let’s call it hardcore reggae).

It was named after the dancehalls that housed local sound systems, from early sound systems.

The music and artists of the genre are representatives of day to day life and combine elements of the American gangster ideal with the true stories of hardship that plagued the lower and working-class people of Kingston. 

jamaican dance bogle

The music explores Kingston’s 6 G’s:

  • Gyals (Girls and Sex)

It utilizes track instrumentals better known as “riddims” to paint the portrait of Jamaica’s most lively music scene.

Again, Dancehall music got its name from Sound System venues called Lawns.

No one personally started dancehall music, it was started by Sound Systems in Jamaica.

A sound system consists of Turntables, huge speakers & boxes, Disc Jockeys, MCs and engineers.

The first sound system used to create Dancehall Music was founded by Tom The Great Sebastian who was of Chinese/Jamaican background.

Jamaican music producers like Duke Reid and Henry “Junjo” Lawes created the first dancehall recordings in the 1970s by taking existing instrumental songs or passages from songs with vocals and rerecording new vocals with other singers and deejays.

Dancehall music blazenly endorses wild sex, drugs and Violence.

Most Adolescents response to dancehall genre has become a national (the Jamaican perspective) and public health concern, and has raised policy debate in terms of adolescent’s sexual and violent behavior (with respect to pregnancy, sexually transmitted infections (STI) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)).

Issues relating to sex and violence among adolescents have, in recent times, raised much public health and policy concerns, especially in an era where first sexual debut is at the mean age of 11 years for boys and 12 years for girls in Jamaica.

Studies have shown that graphical lyrical contents in some music can impact adolescent sexual and violent behavior.

The fast riddim of dancehall sounds seem to hypnotize the youth to believe “nothing is evil… Just embrace your freedom and do what pleases you”

Gun violence has claimed the lives of several top Jamaican artistes. 

That will be a topic for another research work! 

' src=

Henry Kwadwo Amoako

Mr. Henry Kwadwo Amoako is a Ghanaian Social Scientist, Researcher and Acclaimed Historian for over two decades. An Alumnus of the University of Cape Coast in Ghana, a Journalist, Author and a Philanthropist. Email: [email protected] WhatsApp : +233204700052 Call: +233558280780

Leave a Reply Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.

Username or email address  *

Password  *

Remember me Log in

Lost your password?

About: Bogle (dancer)

Gerald Levy (22 August 1964 – 20 January 2005), better known as Bogle and also as Bogle Dancer, Mr Bogle, Father Bogle and Mr Wacky, was a Jamaican dancehall star, dancer and choreographer. Beenie Man called Bogle "the greatest dancer of all time" and he is recognised as "part of the foundation and as an icon inside of dancehall culture." Bogle created more dancehall moves than any other figure, he is best known for creating the Bogle dance which is named after him. His stage name, Bogle, is a reference to Paul Bogle a National Hero of Jamaica.

Powered by OpenLink Virtuoso

Skip to main content

The Jamaica Star

Latest News

jamaican dance bogle

Singer salutes dance icon Bogle on new single

Gerald ‘Bogle’ Levy

At the end of most of his shows, Sammy Davis Jr would perform Mister Bojangles in tribute to Bill 'Bojangles' Robinson, arguably the greatest tap dancer.

Singer Triple Blaxxx believes the best dancer he ever saw was Bogle, the flamboyant member of the Black Roses Crew who inspired Mister Bogle , his latest song.

Produced by Carl McGregor, the single is done to a reggae beat of Mister Bojangles , which Triple Blaxxx heard recently while hiking in the hills of Hollywood, California.

Within days, he had written Mister Bogle , which salutes the wiry 'legs man' who was murdered at a gas station in Kingston in January 2005 at age 40.

"Bogle was unique in so many ways, not jus' him dance moves. Di way him dress, di way him talk...dat dude was jus' different," said Triple Blaxxx.

Bogle, given name Gerald Levy, was one of the sparks that illuminated dancehall music during the 1990s. His moves such as World Dance, Urkle and the Jerry Springer, endeared him to fans and artistes such as Beenie Man and Buju Banton, whose hit songs World Dance and Bogle, respectively, were named for him.

Triple Blaxxx said he met the famed dancer while "dance-hopping" in Kingston back in the day.

Previously known as Sugar Black, Triple Blaxxx was part of the duo Sugar Black and Lebanculah, who recorded for Tony Rebel's Flames Music camp in the 1990s.

View the discussion thread.

Other Entertainment Stories

Nigy Boy

jamaican dance bogle

Jamaica's Greatest Dancer of all time, Bogle aka Father Bogle.

Jamaica’s Greatest Dancer of all time, Bogle aka Father Bogle. Bogle was called the “Dancehall Master” and was best known for his dancing. He had the ability to seemingly create

' src=

  • Published July 11, 2022

Jamaica’s Greatest Dancer of all time, Bogle aka Father Bogle. Bogle was called the “Dancehall Master” and was best known for his dancing. He had the ability to seemingly create dances without effort and his dances would become extremely popular. Creator of the Willie Bounce (named after Bogle’s friend and Black Roses Crew member Willie Haggart), Wacky Dip, Urkle Dance, Sesame Street, Bogle Dance, Pelper, LOY,[ Jerry Springer, Zip It Up, Hotti Hotti Bogle, World Dance, Pop Yuh Collar, Row di Boat, Out and Bad, Sweeper, Stuckie, and many other popular dances. He was also in Belly. In the 1990s, Levy created the Bogle dance, the scene’s first crossover dance move. He was also a major influence on breakout artists such as Elephant Man and Beenie Man, who gave shout-outs to Levy in songs like “Row Like a Boat”: “Seh Mr. Bogle have di brand new style/Come get di style, come get di style.”

Article link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bogle_(… ) @DANCEHALL PLAYER

Jamaica Stone Love Anniversary Dancers High Right Bogle Stacy Keiva DHQ Dancehall king- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lB4Rv… @VP Records

Elephant Man – Willie Bounce | Official Music Video- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r038-… @str8framyaaddance

Boogle Mr. Wacky Last interview- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ixpdh… @it’sjustatv-

BUJU BANTON AND BOGLE ON STAGE AT SUNSPLASH 1992- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=76RCp… @Conv_BMW

The movie Belly– DANCEHALL WELL WICKED- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ePdMn… @Dancehallarchives

HOUSE OF LEO 1994 ROSES CREW STARRED THE SHOW..WILLIAM HAGGART, BOGLE DANCING ..STONE LOVE SOUND- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xFlAF… @Manabreeda

Beenie Man-world dance- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aBbWO… @realmad yastic

Dancehall Invasion Pt.1 Bogle ,ICE – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=unBdI… @National Library of Jamaica

Behind the scenes at Ring Ding with Miss Lou- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pgS1m… @Foxy Brown

Foxy Brown – Tables Will Turn ft. Baby Cham- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sGHYV… @Brotherwhitelion

Bogle Special & Bogle/Delly Ranks/Voicemail ~ Weh Di Time (Official Dancehall Video) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jXRnA… Find me on facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ZigZagZeroM https://www.facebook.com/dainelle.lewis

Find me on instagram at https://www.instagram.com/dainellespe… https://www.instagram.com/zigzagzero_… Find me on youtube at: https://www.youtube.com/dainellespeakstv

COPYRIGHT DISCLAIMER. . Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for fair use &; for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.

Share this:

Holy shakes / kathi roll food review | toronto food spots | fusion food | dessert review, 🖖 clipse live | full set | something in the water 2022 | clipse reunion | pharrell & phriends.

jamaican dance bogle

jamaican dance bogle

  • Latest News
  • Clovis Toons
  • North & East
  • Environment
  • International

jamaican dance bogle

  • Social Love
  • Horse Racing
  • World Champs
  • Commonweath Games
  • FIFA World Cup 2022

jamaican dance bogle

  • Arts & Culture

jamaican dance bogle

  • Tuesday Style
  • Style Observer
  • Food Awards
  • JOL Takes Style Out
  • Design Week JA
  • Black Friday

jamaican dance bogle

  • Relationships
  • Fashion & Beauty
  • Health & Fitness
  • Your Rights

jamaican dance bogle

  • Motor Vehicles
  • Place an Ad
  • Jobs & Careers
  • Study Centre
  • Jnr Study Centre
  • Supplements
  • REGIONAL NEWS
  • ENTERTAINMENT
  • ENVIRONMENT
  • Privacy Policy
  • Editorial Code of Conduct
  • Change Consent
  • Terms and Conditions
  • Editoral Code of Conduct
  • Advertising

jamaican dance bogle

Dancehall is much more than its distinct rhythm. It’s all about style, lyrics, attitude, and as the name suggests, dances! These dances are always creative, and trendsetting, so much so that they’re recognized and imitated internationally.

Here are 10 dances that made the dancehall the place to be!

If you don’t know this dance, then your age is showing. But this dance that came about in the 1970s is still rocking after decades in the dancehall world. The complex dance requires some skill, as you’ll be using your legs, torso, and pelvis. This dance involves lifting your heels and pressing down onto your toes as you curve your legs in and out to the beat of the music

Created by famed Jamaican dancer, Bogle A.KA. Mr. Wacky, this dance is done all over the globe! It involves you pointing your hands toward the air in a flailing steady motion while moving the body back and forth in a snake-like movement. Even Buju Banton loves it! So much so he has a song for it. “Rock Bogle Dance from music sweet you, Bogle a run the place night and day”

Gully Creeper- Elephant Man

The dance is a distinguishing feature of the dancehall space. Popularly known from the 2008 Beijing Olympics when it was done by Usain Bolt. Gully creeper is a popular Jamaican dance invented by the late Ice from the Roses group. The dance consists of you bouncing on your feet while crouching.

The song ‘Gully Creeper, describes how the dance is done “Ben yuh back move up yu shoulda, Move yu foot dem like ah roller Mek up yuh face jus like ah creature” .

Willie Bounce

Willy Bounce is a dance that will have you bouncing from left to right but in a controlled swaying motion. Both feet and hands should also be moving. So basically, it’s left, right and then dip all while swaying. You can dip as low as you want or even ‘buss’ a freestyle.

The eponymous song by Elephant Man explains perfectly how the dance should be done.

“All right bring yuh hand dem gwaan like yuh mad. Then yuh double, the double the out and bad.”

Look left, look right swing yuh hand like yuh bad. Like yuh mad then yuh double, the double the out and bad…Alright stop mek a pose tek a sip shake yuh foot start do the dip”

Skip To Ma Lu

This dance has several song renditions, but they all teach you the same moves. As dancehall artiste Ding Dong would say in his rendition to Skip To Ma Lu which features Serani, “It nuh hard, da one yah easy fi catch.”

Tek Weh Yuhself

If you’re at a party and you can’t keep up with the moves, tek weh yuhself . In this dance, you’ll do little foot-tapping movements while dancing to the music and moving from side to side.

Pon Di River

You better can cross it! The dance move entails bouncing to the music and shifting from heel to toe from one imaginary line to the other while concentrating on the song’s rhythm.

World Dance/ Dancers Anthem

Dancers Anthem is a popular Jamaican dance that is known for its simple movement. The dance is done by first placing your two hands in the air, then place them in a criss-cross position after, and then placing them at your side. This can then be followed by some dance moves that are given in the song.

Listen song below.

Fling is one of the most recent dances that captured the heart of many party-goers and even non-dancers. The movements of the dance are basically flinging your shoulder forward all while maintaining a certain foot movement. The dance is rather a simple one but requires quite a bit of energy.

A dance like this will definitely keep someone in shape. Girls can often be seen at parties doing popular dance move. This dance requires immense skill and involves you knowing how to use your back and pelvis. So here’s how it works; you put your hands on your bent knees, and with an arched back you lift each leg to the beat. And with a little waist action, you’re set!

**Article written by BUZZ interns Mya Watson and Abigail Wint

Now you can read the Jamaica Observer ePaper anytime, anywhere. The Jamaica Observer ePaper is available to you at home or at work, and is the same edition as the printed copy available at https://bit.ly/epaper-login

HOUSE RULES

  • We welcome reader comments on the top stories of the day. Some comments may be republished on the website or in the newspaper; email addresses will not be published.
  • Please understand that comments are moderated and it is not always possible to publish all that have been submitted. We will, however, try to publish comments that are representative of all received.
  • We ask that comments are civil and free of libellous or hateful material. Also please stick to the topic under discussion.
  • Please do not write in block capitals since this makes your comment hard to read.
  • Please don't use the comments to advertise. However, our advertising department can be more than accommodating if emailed: [email protected] .
  • If readers wish to report offensive comments, suggest a correction or share a story then please email: [email protected] .
  • Lastly, read our Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy

Which long-term investment option is more attractive to you at the moment?

  • Real Estate

jamaican dance bogle

pancocojams

Pancocojams showcases the music, dances, language practices, & customs of African Americans and of other people of Black descent throughout the world.

Wednesday, May 18, 2022

Information about jamaican dancehall dancer/dance creator "mr bogle" (with three videos featuring mr bogle).

This is Part II of a five part pancocojams series about Jamaica's Dancehall Reggae dances.  This post presents information about legendary  Jamaican dancer/choreographer "Mr. Bogle" ("Mr. Wacky") and showcases three YouTube videos that feature Mr Bogle. A few selected comments from the discussion threads of various Dancehall videos are also included in this post.

Click  https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2022/05/jamaicas-dancehall-reggae-dances.html   for Part I of this pancocojams series.  This post presents some online excerpts about the history of Jamaica's Dancehall dances. A partial list of and descriptions of some of Dancehall dances are also included in this pancocojams post.

Click https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2022/05/how-dancehall-dance-willie-bounce-got.html for Part III of this pancocojams series. That post showcase a YouTube video of the Dancehall dance "Willie Bounce" and provides information & comments about that dance got its name. Information about Elephant Man who first recorded the "Willie Bounce" in 2006 is also included in that pancocojams post.

Click  https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2022/05/jamaican-dancer-latonya-styles.html   for Part IV of this pancocojams series. That post showcases a YouTube video demonstration of some of the dances that were created by Dancehall  dancer/ creator "Mr. Bogle". Selected comments from that video's discussion thread is also included in that pancocojams post.

Click https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2022/05/comments-about-some-dancehall-dance.html for Part V of this pancocojams series. That post presents online article excerpts and discussion thread comments about some Dancehall dances that inspired or are similar to or the same as certain African American Hip Hop dances.

**** The content of this post is presented for historical and cultural purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners. Thanks to Mr. Bogle for his cultural legacy. Thanks also to all those who are quoted in this post nd thanks to the publishers of these videos on YouTube. -snip- Click  https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2022/05/excerpts-about-history-of-jamaicas.html  for the closely related pancocojams post entitled "Excerpts About The History Of Jamaica's Dancehall Reggae Music".

Also,click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2020/10/the-real-meaning-of-now-classic-2005.html for the 2020 pancocojams post entitled  What The Jamaican Word "Weddy" ("Weh Di") REALLY Means. That post includes the lyrics to Voice mail's 2005 song "Weh Di Time".

And click the Dancehall Reggae tag below for other pancocojams post about that music and dances.

video dave ja, June 20, 2021 **** INFORMATION ABOUT "MR BOGLE" (also known as "MR WACKY") From   https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bogle_(dancer)  "Bogle (22 August 1964 – 20 January 2005), born Gerald Levy, and also known as Bogle Dancer, Mr Bogle, Father Bogle, and Mr Wacky, was a Jamaican dancehall star, dancer and choreographer. Beenie Man called Bogle "the greatest dancer of all time"[1] and he is recognised as "part of the foundation and as an icon inside of dancehall culture."[2] Bogle created more dancehall moves than any other figure, he is best known for creating the Bogle dance which is named after him.[3] His stage name, Bogle, is a reference to Paul Bogle a National Hero of Jamaica.

Gerald Levy was born on 22 August 1964 in Trenchtown, West Kingston in the capital of Jamaica. He was educated at Charlie Smith All Age and spent a brief period at St George's College. As a child in the 1970s he appeared on Louise Bennett's television show Ring Ding and in the 1980s he danced on the Saturday evening television programme Where It's At, both on the Jamaican Broadcasting Corporation.[3]

Bogle was called the "Dancehall Master" and was best known for his dancing. He had the ability to seemingly create dances without effort and his dances would become extremely popular. Creator of the Willie Bounce (named after Bogle's friend and Black Roses Crew member Willie Haggart), Wacky Dip, Urkle Dance, Sesame Street, Bogle Dance, Pelper, LOY,[4] Jerry Springer, Zip It Up, Hotti Hotti Bogle, World Dance,[4] Pop Yuh Collar, Row di Boat, Out and Bad, Sweeper, Stuckie[citation needed], and many other popular dances.[2] He was also in Belly.[citation needed]

In the 1990s, Levy created the Bogle dance, the scene's first crossover dance move. He was also a major influence on breakout artists such as Elephant Man and Beenie Man, who gave shout-outs to Levy in songs like "Row Like a Boat": "Seh Mr. Bogle have di brand new style/Come get di style, come get di style."... -snip- Here's information about Paul Bogle  From  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Bogle "Paul Bogle (1820 – 24 October 1865)[2] was a Jamaican Baptist deacon and activist. He is a National Hero of Jamaica. He was a leader of the 1865 Morant Bay protesters, who marched for justice and fair treatment for all the people in Jamaica. After leading the Morant Bay rebellion, Bogle was captured by government troops, tried and convicted by British authorities under martial law, and hanged on 24 October 1865 in the Morant Bay court house.[3]"...

**** ARTICLE EXCERPT ABOUT MR BOGLE From  https://www.economist.com/1843/2020/01/16/dance-or-die-fighting-for-the-legacy-of-bogle-the-godfather-of-dancehall "Dance or die: fighting for the legacy of Bogle, the “Godfather of dancehall”

Gerald “Bogle” Levy is to dancehall what Bob Marley is to reggae. But 15 years after the legendary dancer was shot dead, Jamaica’s dancehall scene still craves recognition for its fallen hero. Hannah Moore heads to Kingston, by  By hannah moore, Jan 16th 2020 (Updated Jan 20th 2020)

"It’s a warm Sunday afternoon in downtown Kingston and in the yard beside Lonsdale “Boysie” Guy’s house, a group of local women have set up a makeshift sound system for the neighbourhood. They lean on the subwoofer, chatting and teasing each other in quick-fire patois, as one aunty pours generous measures of white rum and cranberry into plastic cups. Aidonia’s braggadocious dancehall hit “Big Baller” thumps through the speaker, making the ground shake beneath our feet.

Wearing a white vest, slim-cut navy track pants and socks with pool sliders, Boysie (pictured above) pulls up a plastic chair and watches them while he waits to start his dance class. He is the last surviving member of the Black Roses crew, a legendary dance collective founded by Gerald “Bogle” Levy, the so-called “Godfather” of dancehall, who was shot dead at a gas station in January 2005. Bogle’s brutal murder shocked Jamaicans and dancehall fans across the world. Despite the national outcry, it remains unsolved.".... **** A FEW COMMENTS ABOUT "MR BOGLE" ("MR WACKY") FROM SEVERAL YOUTUBE VIDEO DISCUSSION THREADS

These comments are given in no particular order and are numbered for referencing purposes only. Discussion thread #1 From  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jXRnAG0Xn2U&t=131s   Bogle Special & Bogle/Delly Ranks/Voicemail ~ Weh Di Time (Official Dancehall Video), published by  Brotherwhitelion, August 8, 2013

1.  DaPhlyymamee, 2017,   "I first fell in love wit di style of Bogle as a teenager. I was like: Who is that man in the green pants????👏👏👏👌💃 I was introduced to Ice's style in a Voicemail video.  I miss these people that I never had to blessing to meet. I was so sad when they left this Earth. 😢Mr. Wacky your dancing will always live on through me! Selah Rest In Power...Respect Ulaghize!❤💛💚"

** 2. Colleth Reid, 2022 "The Man, the History  and the Dance!!!! Bogle legendary dancer.... best 🕺 of all times..... dancer hall still cannot find one that is even close to the boss." ** 3. GhostXLeo, 2022 "🙏🏾🙏🏾🙏🏾 R.I.P The Greatest Dancer in The World 🌎 🙏🏾🙏🏾 Dancehall Legend 🇯🇲 Bogle 👏🏾🙌🏾"

**** Discussion thread #2 From  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wh-8ReMr3Hw  MR WACKY / BOGLE " DANCE - HALL LEGEND '' !!!, Big Stone Television, August 18 2011

1. Ryan Mcdonald, 2022 "S.i.p Mr wacky. Always in our nation people's❤️ heart."

**** Excerpt #3 From  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aQRIYSRIouc   A Jamaican Dance for every Genre by Orville Halls’ Dance Xpressionz, Reggae Month 2020

1. jabrown1978, 2021,  "No mention of doing The Bogle??? EVERYONE, they mama, daddy, grandchildren, cousins, aunties, uncles, even the unborn was doing that dance in the 90's! 😂😁😋 To me, it really became a pop culture reference, and it has to be one of the easiest ones to do."

**** This concludes Part II of this pancocojams series. Thanks for visiting pancocojams. Visitor comments are welcome.

No comments:

Post a comment.

IMAGES

  1. Bogle Dance Jamaican Dance GIF

    jamaican dance bogle

  2. How to Do the Bogle

    jamaican dance bogle

  3. JAMAICA'S GREATEST DANCER BOGLE FROM BLACK ROSES !!!!

    jamaican dance bogle

  4. Bogle Jamaica's greatest dancehall dancer

    jamaican dance bogle

  5. JAMAICAN DANCER REMEMBER BOGLE'S DANCE MOVES

    jamaican dance bogle

  6. Bogle Mr. Wacky The Jamaican Dancehall Legend

    jamaican dance bogle

VIDEO

  1. Top dancers in Jamaica, dancehall fancam podcasts 📻

  2. Tudy n Da Dutty Whine

  3. Jamaica Dance SUperSonic

  4. 🇯🇲best female dancer in Jamaica 🇯🇲( dancing rebel )

  5. How to dance to reggae Dancehall

  6. Boasy Tuesday April 30, 2019

COMMENTS

  1. How to Do the Bogle

    Full Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLAFCE348D8150A703--Watch more How to Dance to Reggae Dancehall videos: http://www.howcast.com/videos/50...

  2. Bogle dance

    The Bogle dance is a Jamaican-born dance move invented in the 1990s which involves the moving of one's body in a longitudinal, ocean-wave motion while at the same time raising and lowering one's arms, aiding the wave motion. The dance move was engineered and created by Gerald Levy, a reggae dancehall legend.

  3. Bogle (dancer)

    Bogle (dancer) Gerald Levy (22 August 1964 - 20 January 2005), better known as Bogle and also as Bogle Dancer, Mr Bogle, Father Bogle and Mr Wacky, was a Jamaican dancehall star, dancer and choreographer. Beenie Man called Bogle "the greatest dancer of all time" [1] and he is recognised as "part of the foundation and as an icon inside of ...

  4. Jamaica's Greatest Dancer of all time, Bogle aka Father Bogle

    #mrbogle #fatherbogle #wackydipJamaica's Greatest Dancer of all time, Bogle aka Father Bogle.Bogle was called the "Dancehall Master" and was best known for h...

  5. 22 BOGLE STEPS (Authentic Dancehall)

    LATONYA STYLE demonstrates Dancehall Steps created by the legendary Gerald "Bogle" Levy aka Mr. Wacky (The Man, The History and The Dance)Latonya Style is a ...

  6. Remembering dancer Bogle

    Bogle, also known as Mr Wacky, was shot and killed at a St Andrew service station on January 20, 2005. He had just left popular dance Weddy Wednesdays at Stone Love headquarters in St Andrew after ...

  7. Bogle dance

    The Bogle is a dance move originating from Kingston, Jamaica.[1] The dance gets its name from a dancer named Bogle[2] who danced as part of Kingston's Black Roses crew,[3][4] who was in turn inspired by Barrington Levy.[5][6] For faster navigation, this Iframe is preloading the Wikiwand page for Bogle dance.

  8. Dance or die: fighting for the legacy of Bogle, the "Godfather of

    Gerald "Bogle" Levy is to dancehall what Bob Marley is to reggae. But 15 years after the legendary dancer was shot dead, Jamaica's dancehall scene still craves recognition for its fallen hero.

  9. Now it's Mister Bogle

    No dance in Jamaica was complete without the icon Bogle, especially during the 1990s. When the flamboyant dancer was murdered in January 2005, dancehall lost one of its unique talents.

  10. Jamaican Dancing

    The Bogle is one of the most popular moves associated with reggae and ska dancing. It involves crossing one arm over another while swaying to the beat of the music. The move is also known as "the wiggle" or "the jerk" and can be seen performed at many clubs across Jamaica. ... Jamaican dance is an eclectic mix of styles from around the ...

  11. Buju Banton

    Request Your Old Favourite Dancehall/Reggae Tunes. Subscribe, Comment, Rate & Add to Favourite. Thank You. For All The Latest Dancehall/Reggae Tracks Check O...

  12. Get back to basics: Learn the iconic moves that define dancehall

    Gerald "Bogle" Levy was seen as an innovator in the Jamaican dance scene — a legend who many credit as creating infectious dance moves that simultaneously influenced the music and helped ...

  13. A dance for Bogle

    Bogle, 40, was shot and killed January 20 2005 in Kingston, shortly after leaving the popular Weddy Weddy dance. No one has been prosecuted for his murder. "Bogle memorial is an event I keep every ...

  14. The Assassination of Legendary Dancehall Dance Pioneer Gerald Bogle

    Through his admiration of the Jamaican national hero Paul Bogle, and his love of dancehall, Levy created the 'Bogle Dance' in 1992. The dance led to a series of hits endorsing the moves, notably Buju Banton's 'Bogle Dance' and Ninjaman's 'Gun Bogle'. The success of Levy's ragga rumbas led to an international tour, which ...

  15. It's All About Dancing: A Jamaican Dance-U-Mentary

    It's All About Dancing: A Jamaican Dance-U-Mentary is a 2006 Jamaican documentary film about dancehall culture. It includes instructional segments about several dance moves that were popular at the time, such as the "Air Force One" or the "Gorilla Warfare". ... Scatta, Richie Feelings, Bogle, John Hype, Ice, Sadiqy & G-Unit, Latisha and Kiyo ...

  16. About: Bogle (dancer)

    Gerald Levy (22 August 1964 - 20 January 2005), better known as Bogle and also as Bogle Dancer, Mr Bogle, Father Bogle and Mr Wacky, was a Jamaican dancehall star, dancer and choreographer. Beenie Man called Bogle "the greatest dancer of all time" and he is recognised as "part of the foundation and as an icon inside of dancehall culture." Bogle created more dancehall moves than any other ...

  17. Bogle Special & Bogle/Delly Ranks/Voicemail

    Gerald 'Bogle' Levy, aka 'Mr. Wacky', at Rose's Corner, Kingston Jamaica 2005.Bogle was the first to make a name for himself as a Dancehall Dancer/Choreograp...

  18. Singer salutes dance icon Bogle on new single

    Bogle, given name Gerald Levy, was one of the sparks that illuminated dancehall music during the 1990s. His moves such as World Dance, Urkle and the Jerry Springer, endeared him to fans and artistes such as Beenie Man and Buju Banton, whose hit songs World Dance and Bogle, respectively, were named for him. Triple Blaxxx said he met the famed ...

  19. Jamaica's Greatest Dancer of all time, Bogle aka Father Bogle

    Jamaica's Greatest Dancer of all time, Bogle aka Father Bogle. Bogle was called the "Dancehall Master" and was best known for his dancing. He had the ability to seemingly create dances without effort and his dances would become extremely popular. Creator of the Willie Bounce (named after Bogle's friend and Black Roses Crew member Willie

  20. How to Dance to Reggae Dancehall : How to Do the Bogle in ...

    Learn how to do the bogle in dancing to reggae dancehall music with expert advice on dance moves and skills in this free dance lesson video.Expert: Safi A. T...

  21. Dance moves that revolutionized dancehall

    Bogle. Created by famed Jamaican dancer, Bogle A.KA. Mr. Wacky, this dance is done all over the globe! It involves you pointing your hands toward the air in a flailing steady motion while moving ...

  22. Information about Jamaican Dancehall Dancer/Dance Creator "Mr Bogle

    Gerald 'Bogle' Levy, aka 'Mr. Wacky', at Rose's Corner, Kingston Jamaica 2005. Bogle was the first to make a name for himself as a Dancehall Dancer/Choreographer, who created as many dance moves, as 'moving' as 'many' to dance. Bogle features on the video clip Weh Di Time, with Delly Ranks and Voicemail. Tragically Bogle was killed...

  23. JAMAICAN DANCER REMEMBER BOGLE'S DANCE MOVES

    Bogle was called the "Dancehall Master" and was best known for his dancing. He had the ability to seemingly create dances without effort and his dances would...