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Tips from a Marine Surveyor: Avoid These Yacht-Buying Pitfalls

Career marine surveyor Tarn Kelsey wants you to know that marine surveys are a lot more than just a required step in the yacht-buying process: they're an opportunity. Purchasing a yacht is an exciting time, but prospective buyers would be wise to leverage the marine survey process to their advantage. We sat down with Tarn to talk through the marine survey process and his tips and advice for how you can get the most out of your next survey and avoid the common pitfalls he sees yacht buyers make.

Survey Says...

So what is a marine survey? Marine surveys are reports and valuations prepared by certified marine surveyors, who are like expert witnesses, acting as impartial third parties in a transaction. They are like a home inspector and an appraiser rolled into one, both inspecting and assigning a value. Tarn's specialty is pre-purchase inspections. He inspects the boat and prepares a written report for the prospective buyer, as well as for the insurance and financing companies involved. Tarn has been in the marine business since he began working in boat repair at 18. At 36, he hung up the tool belt and began apprenticing with a marine surveyor, and has been surveying boats ever since. 

When does a marine survey happen?

Pre-purchase inspections happen after a prospective buyer contacts a listing broker, decides they want to buy a boat, and signs a contract to start the purchasing process. That contract starts a clock for the rest of the process, and that's when it's time to get a marine surveyor like Tarn on board to take a look at the boat. 

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Survey Surveyors

Choosing a marine surveyor you trust is key. Most folks find Tarn through word-of-mouth recommendations from happy past clients, so reaching out to your networks can be a great way to get a few names to start with; brokers will usually recommend several names to preserve impartiality in picking surveyors. If you're searching online, look for names that come up again and again while cross-referencing forums, websites, and/or boat manufacturers' owner's groups. As the one who's ultimately buying the boat, you have the final say on who your marine surveyor is. It's a good idea to interview a few to find the right fit. You'll need to know if a potential surveyor:

- has enough career experience under their belt;

- is available to perform the survey and produce the report within the given timeframe;

- is familiar with the type of boat you're buying (sail vs. power, etc.); and

- tests engines, generators, and/or other specific equipment on the boat, and to what extent.

If you're going through the purchase process solo, you may want to keep in mind that some marine surveyors will only work with buyers who are working with a broker. Working with a broker can make the purchase process go much more smoothly for you overall, and the survey day for your marine surveyor: they know the ins and outs of how to prep the boat to ensure a successful day.

Macro to Micro

When Tarn arrives to survey a boat, he starts with the big things first: Are there basic structural problems? Is the rudder falling off? Is the deck rotting? Has the engine obviously caught on fire? After he's gotten an initial feel for the boat as a whole, he tackles the details, working his way through systems, and taking the boat out for a test run to check navigation systems and the sails on sailboats. Does the refrigeration work? How well? Are the hoses in good condition? How many hours are on the engine? This macro-to-micro approach allows him to systematically assess the boat's condition and begin working toward a valuation. Different used boats have different levels of wear and tear, and a marine surveyor can give you fantastic insight into the lifespans of various onboard systems and how well you can expect the boat to perform for your intended purposes. 

How do surveyors assign value to a boat?

It depends on the boat! Some boats are easy because they're from a popular brand with a lot of comps on the market to compare value to. Custom boats with no sister ships can be a little trickier and you have to get creative to figure out fair comparisons. Overall, the basic question is whether the boat is above or below average for what it is and how it compares to similar boats.

Mistakes Yacht Buyers Make

As a career marine surveyor, Tarn has seen a lot of prospective yacht buyers on their prospective yachts, and he's noticed some common pitfalls excited buyers can make:

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Getting too attached before the marine survey.

It's natural to be excited when you are close to buying a new boat, but getting carried away by your emotions can cloud your judgment. Try to maintain neutrality until after you've absorbed the marine survey report. If you've already got your heart set on a yacht and then discover the engine will need to be replaced within a couple of years, it might be difficult to accurately assess whether that's a future expense you actually want to sign on for.

- Not doing enough homework on the type of boat they're buying and the systems involved.

This one is pretty self-explanatory: it's hard to know what are key features or potential problems on a boat if you're not familiar with it, and if you're overwhelmed by a marine survey report on systems you don't understand, you could miss something critical that might make you decide whether or not to buy the boat.

- Overpaying for a boat or buying too much boat for what they have the experience for.

Some folks think it's best to buy as much boat as you can afford, but if you're not an experienced boat owner, you may not realize what it costs to maintain a larger boat after the initial purchase, which could be up to 5-10% of the boat’s value per year, not including where you keep it! It's not uncommon for marine surveyors to survey one boat twice within a couple years because the first buyers were overwhelmed and disillusioned by too much boat.

- Inviting "expert" friends to weigh in. 

Sure, some friends really do know what they're talking about and having an extra head aboard during the purchasing process can bring some balance to the equation, especially if you know you struggle with staying neutral. But choose who to bring into the decision-making process carefully. How experienced are they? Sometimes soliciting too many opinions can be unhelpful, especially if they're just opinions rather than expert advice.

- Not working with a broker or using a "hands off" broker who doesn't prep the boat before the survey.

As mentioned previously, some marine surveyors won't work with you if you're not working with a broker, and for good reason. Prepping a boat for a survey can be involved, and brokers know the ropes: all the systems should have been turned on, the batteries should be charged, etc. If a boat has been untouched for months (or years!) until the marine surveyor arrives, a lot of their limited time can be wasted on last-minute repairs and troubleshooting systems.

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Get the Most from a Survey

So now that you know what mistakes to avoid, here's how you can go beyond and get the most out of your marine survey:

- Have an active dialogue with the marine surveyor throughout the survey.

Instead of waiting until the end to get a report you're left to decipher alone, get engaged with the surveying process. Ideally, nothing in the report should be a surprise because you had one-on-one time with the marine surveyor as they went through their process. No matter what your technical background is, you're sure to learn something helpful about the boat and its systems. Simply ask, "Do you mind if I go with you?" at the start of the survey to kick off an active dialogue that you only stand to gain from.

- Consider the time of year.

If you're surveying a boat north of the Carolinas in winter, it has likely been winterized; therefore, there are systems you either can't test or that are not cost-effective to test. Sometimes you can't help it: the boat will be gone if you wait until spring. But if you want to be sure everything can be tested and included in the survey, it's good to keep this in mind in terms of how you time your yacht-buying search.

A marine survey is so much more than an item on the yacht-purchasing process checklist. By doing your homework and staying engaged in the marine survey process, you can ensure that you have a clear picture of the boat you're hoping to buy and make a confident, informed decision about your yacht purchase. Happy boat buying!

Interested in getting a marine survey done by Tarn Kelsey? Reach out here: [email protected]. And if you're looking for a broker to aid in the entire yacht-buying process, learn why David Walters Yachts buyer's agents are some of the best in the business here [LINK TO BUYER'S AGENT BLOG] .

 Amanda Noon

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Marine Surveys and Surveyors

marine surveyors and surveys

If you’re considering the differences between buying new or used boats , boat surveys are a topic that’s sure to come up. You don’t often need to have a survey done when buying a new boat, however, if a used boat is under consideration a survey is generally considered a must. This is because:

  • Many lenders won’t consider financing a used boat that hasn’t been surveyed.
  • Many insurance companies won’t consider insuring a used boat that hasn’t been surveyed.
  • Used boats are subject to many problems that are hidden from view and require a professional to spot.
  • A marine survey is helpful in determining what repairs or upgrades may be necessary to get a boat into safe operating condition.
  • Boat surveys help determine the actual value of a boat, since they can expose items in need of repair or replacement.

different types of marine surveys

Different Types of Marine Surveys

Boat surveys fall into several categories including:

  • Condition and Value (C&V) surveys
  • Insurance C&V surveys

Appraisal Surveys

Damage Surveys

New Yacht Surveys

Condition and Value Surveys and Insurance C&V Surveys

Condition and Value surveys are the most common type of boat survey, and are performed when you’re buying a used boat. These are comprehensive inspections that include the entire boat and its propulsion systems, though with very large, expensive boats, separate engine surveys are sometimes performed. And in the case of large sailboats, additional rigging surveys may be necessary.

Insurance C&Vs are essentially the same thing, but since they’re done solely for insurance purposes they’re generally less comprehensive and stick to a list of specific items that the insurance company wants checked before covering a boat.

These are just what they sound like: surveys performed to identify a boat’s approximate value. Usually these are required in cases of divorce or estate settlements, although in some cases a lender may require one prior to financing a boat .

Damage surveys may be necessary after storm or accident damage. They determine the extent of the damage and the cost of repairs. Often these are required by insurance companies after an unfortunate incident.

New yacht surveys are usually only necessary on large, expensive boats. They’re sometimes performed for custom-built yachts and may take place over time, with the surveyor visiting the manufacturer several time to check on construction as the boat or yacht is being built. Whenever you’re dealing with a reputable production boatbuilder, however, this isn’t considered necessary. How do you know that a manufacturer is reputable? Make sure you’re buying an NMMA certified boat . Certified builders undergo regular third-party inspections, and meet American Boat & Yacht Council standards and specifications—which go above and beyond Coast Guard requirements.

How to Choose a Marine Surveyor

Many people choose a boat surveyor via a recommendation from a broker, seller, or lender, while others depend on word of mouth. In some cases, lenders or insurance companies maintain lists of approved surveyors they trust. There’s one key factor to bear in mind: you should make sure any surveyor you use is a member of either the National Association of Marine Surveyors (NAMS) or the Society of Accredited Marine Surveyors (SAMS) .

Both of these organizations have membership requirements and standards that surveyors have to meet in order to gain accreditation, so when you hire a NAMS or SAMS surveyor you know he or she is a professional.

how to choose a marine surveyor

Frequently Asked Questions

How much does a boat survey cost?

Pricing varies in different areas, but as a general rule of thumb plan on spending around $20 to $25 per foot of boat. Note, however, that many surveyors have a minimum charge that may exceed this rate with small boats.

How do I find a boat surveyor?

Start by visiting NAMS or SAMS online, to locate some of their accredited surveyors in your area.

How long does a boat survey take?

Anywhere from a couple of hours for a small boat, to a couple of days for a large boat or yacht.

Do I have to be present for the boat survey?

Surveyors usually don’t require you to be present. However, it’s a good move to be there. You’ll probably learn a lot about the boat you’re buying—and about boats in general.

Does a boat survey tell me how much needed repairs will cost?

Generally speaking yes, the surveyor will sketch out a basic budget for repairs or required upgrades. Remember, however, that they’ll be using average costs and the numbers they provide aren’t exact.

To learn more about the entire buying process, financing or ownership costs, be sure to read:

  • Choosing the Right Boat: Buying Guide for Recreational Boating
  • Boat Loan Calculator
  • B oat Values & Boat Prices: Negotiating Your Purchase
  • Boat Buyer's Guide
  • Costs of Ownership: Boat Costs & Affordability

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Boat Survey: What It Is, Who Pays, Do I Need to Spend the Money?

26th jan 2022 by rightboat team.

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Is a used boat survey worth the expense? It’s a valid question that many people ask when considering buying a used boat. After all, buying a boat is an expensive undertaking, and anywhere you can save money during the process is a bonus. So, do you need to lay out the extra money for a marine survey before signing on the dotted line? The answer is likely a yes, unless it’s a small, very inexpensive boat and the risk factor is low. Take a look at the questions surrounding why a boat survey may be essential:

What is a Boat Survey?

Before we look at why you need a boat survey, let’s look at what exactly a boat survey is. Also referred to as a pre-purchase boat survey , it involves a professional marine surveyor giving your prospective purchase a thorough inspection and producing a report detailing areas where there may be faults or damage. Surveys aren’t limited to high end superyachts , and all used boats –and indeed new boats which may have been sitting in a yard for a long time–can benefit from having a survey carried out.

Types of Boat Survey

There are several types of boat survey, including:

Insurance Survey

This tends to be the most basic of the surveys and is a general overview of the value and/or condition of the boat which is required by an insurance company before they will offer coverage for it. Do you need a boat survey for insurance? In most cases for used boats if you want to insure the boat itself (as opposed to getting liability insurance) the answer will be yes. 

Finance Survey

This is similar to the insurance survey. Marine mortgage lenders or finance institutions will usually ask for a survey to be completed before signing off on finance to ensure that what is essentially their asset (or partly their asset) is a good one. 

Pre- or Post-Transport Survey

This assesses the condition of a boat before or after being transported and is again used for insurance purposes.

Full Condition Survey

Also referred to as a pre-purchase survey, this is the most comprehensive type of survey and will delve deeper into the condition of the boat, checking everything from its structural integrity to the electronics, safety systems, interior cosmetics and more. While all boats will have different requirements, essentially a full condition survey will look at the hull, transom, engine, mechanical and propulsion gear, communications equipment, fittings, and electronics. Things such as cracks, osmosis, signs of accidents, and water damage will be looked for, as well as general condition, age related wear and tear, connections, and deck fixtures. 

See the article: Types Marine Surveys: Pre-Purchase, Condition and Damage

man checking a boat

Who Pays for a Boat Survey?

The buyer is responsible for paying for a marine survey, as they are the ones undertaking the ‘risk’ of purchasing a used boat. Whether or not the boat is bought via a broker, there is unlikely to be recourse if, after purchase, issues are found with the boat. It is the responsibility of the purchaser to ensure they have done due diligence and had their prospective purchase thoroughly checked. 

Another point worth noting is that if you, the buyer, organize and pay for the surveyor yourself, you know they are impartial. It is worth being wary of a seller offering to pay for a marine survey with a surveyor of their choosing (read our guide  Buying a used boat from a private party ). 

Why Do I Need a Marine Survey?

Outside of insurance or finance lenders requesting a survey, you should be getting a marine survey to ensure that your asset is a good one. Whatever budget you have for a boat will be proportional to your income, and the last thing you want is to buy a boat that costs you far more than it’s worth, or is worth less than what you will have to invest into it. 

A marine survey will flag problems there may be with a boat, but also let you know about all the things that are good with it. Far from a report of doom and gloom, it should ultimately ensure you feel reassured and prepared to take the final step to purchasing, or to feel justified and relieved in walking away from something that didn’t feel quite right. 

Can I Negotiate the Price?

Once you have your report in your hand, take your time to read through it and query anything you’re unsure of with the surveyor. It is important to note that the survey is for you. Armed with the recommendations and status report, you may want to then use it to negotiate a better price or ask for certain work to be carried out before purchasing. Be sure to get accurate estimates for the work that needs doing before negotiating the price. While it might seem like you can grab a bargain if the seller is willing to drop the price considerably, you need to keep in mind the work that requires doing both in terms of time and cost. Check out our guide to Buying a Cheap Boat, Is it is a Good Idea?  

sailboat check

How Do I Choose a Marine Surveyor?

If you’re going to spend money getting a marine survey, then you want to ensure you’re getting a good service and a thorough report by an experienced surveyor. Again, it’s always best to use a surveyor you find yourself or are recommended by a trusted friend as opposed to one recommended by a broker or the seller. While their intentions are likely to be good, impartiality is best here.

When choosing a surveyor, you want to ask the following questions:

  • Are they registered with an official surveying organization which regulates its members? In the U.S. the Society of Accredited Marine Surveyors (SAMS) and the National Association of Marine Surveyors (NAMS) are the two main organizations and in the UK, these include the Yacht Designers & Surveyors Association in the UK and the International Institute of Marine Surveying. These organizations hold lists of members in different regions, and so it is a good place to start looking. 
  • Do they have specific experience in surveying the size, style and construction of the boat you are considering buying? There are specialist surveyors in sail boats, wooden boats, sports boats, etc.
  • Do they produce clear reports? Ask to see a sample report to see the layout, detail, and wording they use before deciding if it is right for you. You want a clear report which offers definitive recommendations or opinions.
  • What do they charge? Be sure to get official quotes as well as their terms and conditions before agreeing to a marine survey. You also want to ensure that they carry indemnity insurance. 

Do I Need to Be There for the Marine Survey?

You don’t have to be present for the survey, but it is a good idea to be present if possible. You will learn a lot about the boat you’re buying as you watch the surveyor work, and they can show you things as they discover them, which is easier than reading about it in the report later. 

We know that finding the perfect boat can seem like a daunting task. But armed with our library of practical information , advisors on hand to talk you through the process, and of course thousands of boats for sale all over the world, Rightboat.com will ensure you find the perfect boat for you. 

Related articles:

  • Do I Need a Sea Trial? Costs, Checklist and more

How to Buy a Boat: The Ultimate Guide

Steps to Buying a Used Boat

Boat Inspection Checklist: Buying a Used Boat

Written By: Rightboat Team

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Yacht Survey Partners | Superyacht survey specialists

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The Superyacht Survey Process

We find that both clients and crew want to know how our superyacht survey process works, and how we reliably plan and execute our surveys so as to deliver our paper and online reports so rapidly. As always, the secret is in careful advance planning by the team and careful coordination whilst onboard, combined with the experience of our survey team members and our unique cloud based survey software. The aim of this article is to explain the process and to discuss some of the choices and decisions that need to be addressed in order to deliver a successful outcome.

Pre contract phase

We usually get approached by the buyer’s broker once they feel that the transaction has a realistic prospect of going to contract, but not necessarily before contracts are signed. We are used to providing survey proposals at this stage, in order to give the buyer’s team an idea of what is involved and the likely cost. It isn’t unusual for things to go quiet for a period of time, as lawyers and brokers negotiate the final detail of the sale and purchase contract. During this period, we may have pencilled a rough date into our survey calendar. We will also have discussed with the buyer’s team what their likely requirements will be in terms of haulout and the use of specialists. Depending on the client’s requirements, we may also have sounded out our preferred specialists, and will have looked at the availability of synchrolift or dry dock options for the underwater hull survey, all the time keeping details of the transaction confidential.

Post signing contracts

Once contracts are signed, the pace generally accelerates rapidly. We work with the buyer’s team to firm up the survey location and timetable, allocate our surveyors to the survey and book the specialists required by the buyer (usually Cat or MTU, plus electrical, noise & vibration, paint and possibly NDT). If needed by the buyer, we will also compile a shortlist of haulout locations and prepare a scope of work for each shipyard to quote on. Once the plan is firmed up, we will send a survey briefing letter to the Captain, yacht manager and selling broker, letting them know what to expect during the survey.

Survey planning

Obviously the time needed for the survey will vary depending on a number of factors, but our approach is to scale our team to complete our survey on even the largest yacht (and we regularly work on yachts from 40 metres up to 160 metres or more) within 5 working days. Occasionally the survey might need to be split into two attendances, for instance, if the yacht needs to be moved to a haulout facility, or where the yacht is going to use a traditional dry dock, which will inevitably be slower than using a travel lift or synchrolift.

In planning our time onboard, we usually try to avoid holding the sea trial on day 1, as we like time to become familiar with the yacht and its systems and to get to know the crew. We find that day 2 usually works well for the sea trial. Although we request a minimum of 4 hours at sea for the sea trial, the reality is that with pre sea checks and post sea trial checks, the sea trial will occupy a whole day. Our surveys require half a day undertaking what we refer to as “interrupting” work (ie they can interrupt the yacht’s routine and day to day work of the crew) whilst we undertake a blackout trial and test transitional power sources, fire alarms and fire doors, remote closing watertight doors etc. We try to group these tests into half a day following the sea trial, usually on day 3. We encourage all parties to try to make the haulout the very last part of the survey process for several reasons: it is the part of the survey most likely to encounter delays beyond our control; the survey team cannot be onboard whilst the yacht is being lifted and moved, or whilst the dry dock is being drained or flooded, and in either case until power is restored, losing us time; if any problems arise during the underwater hull inspection, it is much more cost effective to leave the yacht ashore for a few additional days in order to deal with the issue, rather than relaunching and then having to haulout all over again at a future date; and finally, if the sea trial is a disaster, the buyer might avoid the cost of a haulout in the event that they decide to reject the yacht following the technical sea trial.

Report delivery

Assuming that everything goes according to plan, the buyer’s team are going to be anxious to know our opinions as early as possible. To that end, we maintain a regular dialogue with the buyer’s team during the survey, with regular written updates. We will have established with the buyer’s team how quickly they need the report. Our current record is to submit a 350 page report within 48 hours of stepping off a 95 metre Lurssen. With planning and experience, by scaling our team size and by harnessing the power of our cloud based survey software, we’re able to provide industry leading reports within very tight deadlines.

If we can help you with your next superyacht pre purchase survey, please contact us by using the details here .

Other acrticles

If you would like to read other articles about superyacht surveys, please click here to read an article about use of specialist contractors, or here to read our thoughts on whether or not to haulout as part of the survey.

Yacht Survey Partners are global specialist superyacht surveyors. We are currently active in the UK, USA, Netherlands, Germany, Italy, France, Spain, Greece, Turkey, Malta, the Caribbean and further afield, undertaking pre purchase surveys, pre sale surveys, condition surveys, insurance damage surveys and providing advice to buyers, owners, family offices, brokers, managers, insurers, lawyers and shipyards. Our surveyors are located in London, Palma, Barcelona, Antibes, Monaco, Genoa, Fort Lauderdale and Hong Kong.

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Is ai the future of superyacht surveys, navigating superyacht p&i insurance claims, superyacht investor article featuring yacht survey partners.

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How much does a boat or yacht survey cost?

survey yacht broker

February 5, 2024 By admin No comments yet

Appraising a yacht requires a sound knowledge of the factors likely to influence its value. The right choice of expert is essential. The professional assesses the boat according to specific criteria, including its size, value, technological complexity and the geographical location of its mooring.

Yacht valuation: assessing costs

Variability of yacht survey costs.

The costs associated with a yacht survey can vary depending on the model of yacht, as well as its size, make and age. Superyachts require a more detailed survey to assess all aspects of the vessel: advanced navigation systems, interior fittings and state-of-the-art entertainment facilities. The need for a regular survey also ensures that the value of your investment is maintained. The cost of a yacht survey starts at 500 euros.

How much does a boat or yacht survey cost? 2024

Methods of invoicing a yacht survey

There are 2 main billing methods for survey services. The first is based on a fixed value per metre of hull. The advantage of this approach is transparency in the pricing of your yacht survey. The second billing method is based on the duration of the survey. It is therefore important to use a professional you can trust to examine your boat.

How do you choose the right professional for a yacht survey?

Marine surveyors.

To obtain a reliable marine survey, you can call on a professional who specialises in the nautical field. The Chambre Nationale des Experts Maritimes Plaisance (CNEMP) provides you with a list of approved surveyors in France. The International Federation of Marine Surveyors (FIEM) also has a list of surveyors you can turn to.

Boat brokers

Using a yacht broker is a simple solution for surveying your yacht. The broker acts as a trusted intermediary who puts his technical, nautical and commercial skills at your service, with the aim of accurately assessing the condition of the yacht, its history and its market value. The intervention of a broker guarantees a fair and equitable value for your yacht.

The surveyors

How much does a boat or yacht survey cost? 2024

Surveyors, whose directory is available from the French Nautical Industries Federation (FIN), are professionals specially trained to carry out thorough inspections of boats. Their expertise covers assessment of the condition of the hull, engines, electronics, on-board safety and all safety equipment.

5 steps to having your yacht surveyed

Step 1: find a marine or river surveyor.

The first step is to find a boat surveyor who is qualified, experienced and approved. You can carry out this search online, seek recommendations from marine brokers, or turn to yachting associations for advice.

Step 2: Contact the yacht surveyor

Once you’ve identified the yacht surveyor, get in touch to discuss your specific requirements. Take advantage of this meeting to draw up an estimate for the survey of your yacht. This will also allow you to compare the different levels of service and pricing available on the market.

Step 3 Schedule a visit with the surveyor

How much does a boat or yacht survey cost? 2024

Once you have accepted the surveyor’s quote, schedule a visit to your yacht at a date and time that suits you. The surveyor will thoroughly inspect every aspect of your yacht and assess its general condition.

Step 4: Receive the survey report

Following the inspection, the surveyor will provide you with a detailed survey report. This report includes all the information relating to the general condition of your boat, any repairs that may be necessary, as well as recommendations for maintenance and safety on board. The document includes information such as :

checking the hull, anodes and propulsion systems for fibreglass boats, signs of moisture and osmosis for steel boats, ultrasonic soundings are taken to measure the thickness of the hull.

The yacht inspection also covers the hull, paintwork, deck, superstructure, equipment, engine and the interior of the vessel, including equipment and structure. Finally, the vessel’s safety equipment and administrative documentation are also checked to ensure that your yacht is compliant.

Step 5: taking action

Depending on the conclusions of the survey report, you will be able to make informed decisions. This may include selling your boat, undertaking any necessary repairs, or carrying out renovation work.

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How To Get A Sailboat Surveyed

  • November 29, 2022

The pre-purchase survey is one of the most crucial parts of the purchase process. Beyond checking boxes for a contract, it’s a chance to learn about your sailboat, and figure out what you need to do to make it better. And you can make sure you’re getting maximum value for your sailboat purchase.

Finding a Sailboat Surveyor

The Society of Accredited Marine Surveyors has a searchable database of qualified, accredited marine surveyors. Many states don’t regulate who may call themselves a surveyor, so take the steps to make sure that the person you hire has professional credentials.

Ask other sailboat owners for recommendations, though you still check credentials. Get quotes for pricing and check availability as the best surveyors are usually very busy.

If the listing broker recommends a surveyor, it’s best to thank them politely and find your own. While brokers and surveyors should be ethical, it’s better to avoid any confusion about who the surveyor is working for. The surveyor works for you and no one else, and the choice is entirely yours.

Survey pricing is variable with region and boat size and complexity. Expect at least $20/foot, possibly up to $40/foot. For large, complex boats that take multiple days or a survey which requires travel, then may quote you a per diem rate and expenses.

What exactly is a survey?

A survey is a detailed of a sailboat, and may be done for several reasons. An insurance company will require a survey, but an insurance survey is rarely as detailed and expensive as a pre-purchase survey, though a pre-purchase survey will satisfy the insurance company.

The word “survey” also refers to the final written report.

Pre-purchase inspection

You should have a condition in your purchase and sale agreement that reads “subject to a suitable survey and sea trial.” The sea trial is usually part of a survey and done at the same time.

The surveyor will inspect the boat from bow to stern, looking into all lockers, under all floorboards, and at accessible systems. They may tap the hull and deck with a small hammer, looking for voids in the fiberglass. They’ll turn things on, flip switches, and check the listed inventory against the actual boat to make sure listed equipment is present and functioning.

During the seal trial, the surveyor will observe the steering systems and the engine running through a series of throttle positions, noting any problems or concerns.

The Written Report

Within a few days of the inspection, the surveyor will return a written report of the findings. This will include pictures, comments, notes, and details about the boat’s equipment.

The report should be a neutral, fact-based set of observations about the condition of the vessel’s condition at the time of inspection.

A sailboat survey report should include:

  • Details about installed engines and generators, including model numbers, serial numbers, and engine hours.
  • Listing of hardware found, and its condition and operating state.
  • Observations and notes on the general condition of the boat cosmetically.
  • Notes on any specific flaws, failings, or areas that merit additional inspection or concern.
  • An approximate market value of a vessel.
  • Recommendations for any repairs or maintenance noted. Any violations of USCG safety regulations.

It rarely includes speculation about conditions which are not directly observed, nor will the surveyor typically include a recommendation for or against purchase. This is a “statement of condition” rather than a recommendation.

That’s not to say the surveyor may not have an opinion about whether you should buy the boat, but that won’t usually be in the written survey report. But you can definitely ask them about it.

Planning the Survey

Once you find a surveyor, speak to them to make sure what is included in the survey. Many surveyors won’t climb rigs to inspect rigging. Others may only do a cursory inspection of engines, or not want to comment on sail conditions. Find out what else you may need, and plan additional inspections with your rigger, mechanic, or sailmaker as needed.

You’re also responsible for arranging and paying for yard services like hauling, washing, blocking, and re-launching. Find out what the surveyor wants and make reservations at the hard you want to use.

Surveys are “non-destructive” unless otherwise specified, so there should be no drilling, scraping, or other destructive testing. If there is destructive testing needed, you will need permission, and the seller will expect you to return the boat to the same condition if you reject the boat.

Before the planned survey, check the weather, confirm your hauling arrangements, and make sure everything is ready to go. When it’s survey time, plan to show up and spend the day on the boat with the surveyor. Consider arrangements for lunch, drinks and snacks to keep work going forward, especially if the boat is some place out of the way.

Some boat owners prefer not to be there, but in our experience, this is a mistake. You don’t want to get underfoot and slow the surveyor down, but you will get loads of information about your boat as you watch them work. Some may give you a running commentary or point things out to you as they find them, and may show you things no picture and paragraph of text will convey. And you also may help and speed the process.

The owner may be there. If not, they will have someone representing them. This is often the listing broker who will operate the boat and handle it in maneuvers. It’s not your boat yet, so it’s up to the owner or the owner’s agent to take responsibility for the boat.

For a more complex sailboat, plan to spend a long day, or even more than a day on a very complex boat with lots of systems. If it’s a multi-day survey, find out how your surveyor takes their coffee. A happy surveyor is a talkative surveyor, and you’ll learn a lot by just chatting about the boat on a break.

Getting The Report

The goal of the survey report is to establish if the sailboat actually is as presented for sale, based on the age and disclosed condition of the boat. A used sailboat will not be perfect. There is a nearly 100% chance that a good surveyor will find one or more “problems.” Odds are, it will be many more for older boats. It is important to note that not every “finding” in a survey is going to translate to a price adjustment or repair on a used boat.

Understanding the meaning of “Findings”

It’s the interpretation of whether a “finding” is a “problem” that the trick lies. An older boat may have dings and scratches in gelcoat, rust on some mechanical system, minor corrosion, small leaks, and may items that show wear and tear.

And that may be completely normal for the age of the boat. It is a used boat, not a new one. What you may think of as a problem is really just a finding.

What becomes a genuine problem is something which does not function or interferes with the ability to use the boat safely without fixing it.

A scratch in the gelcoat is a finding, but a missing handle on a through-hull is a problem. A radio listed in the inventory should work or be fixed or replaced if it isn’t, but a forward-looking sonar listed as “inoperable” before the survey is just a finding.

Handling Findings

Review each finding in the report. The major findings will usually be highlighted, and those which make the boat unsafe or inoperable will be called out.

For each major finding that must be fixed, you have two options. First, you can demand that the seller fix the problem. Most contracts allow the seller to either fix a problem or propose a cash adjustment in the sale price. Sometimes, you may also propose a cash adjustment – check the terms of your contract.

If the seller refuses to fix the item or adjust the price, you have two more options: you can accept the boat with the flaws, or you can walk from the deal.

Effective Post-Survey Negotiations

Most contracts require the purchaser to present, in writing, any requests to fix problems in a survey. There are effective ways to do this, and ways that are bound to fail.

Do Your Homework

Handing the seller a copy of the survey and saying “fix everything” isn’t like to get a positive response. Nor is demanding a large dollar figure off the sale price with no supporting argument to justify the figure.

So if you’re serious about buying this boat and want to deal with the flaws, you’ll need to get an estimated value for the repair for every problem you want addressed. Only use the serious findings – safety issues, things that render the boat unusable, or major equipment which does not work. This gives the buyer an out to take the dollar adjustment, or fix the problem.

Get hard numbers and actual quotes from vendors and suppliers when possible, and document it. The cost to replace new units or buy older equipment from Ebay or marine salvage and consignment shops are both allowed, as are a reasonable cost for labor to replace the equipment.

Be reasonable – the seller isn’t going to re-fit the boat for you. One broken radar display in an integrated but obsolete set of electronics will not get you a new, state-of-the-art set of integrated equipment installed. Even if you can’t get a compatible radar display anymore. You may get a credit for the cost of a used radar display, but not all the other equipment.

You don’t want to wait for the seller to repair the boat before you close, and you can be almost certain the seller does not want to be bothered to do the repairs either, unless they can do it themselves on the cheap. So you can escrow the repairs. Based on the estimates you assembled, block out money from the sale to make the repairs. The broker will hold this, though you can use a lawyer. List repair items with a reasonable time period to get the repairs done, with costs for each. From 90 to 180 days is typical, depending on the repairs.

As you do the repairs, give the bills to the broker and they release the funds to reimburse you. Once you’ve done the work or the deadline passes, the remaining funds are released to the seller. It’s more work, but you can often get more funds conceded with an escrow than you can with a simple credit off the selling price.

Is It Time To Walk?

If you’ve taken a boat to survey, you’ve put some money into it, and have a personal stake in buying it. But what if the survey is not as good as expected? How do you know if it’s time to walk from the deal?

First, if you are uncomfortable with any finding or that it can be fixed, reject the boat. If you have a list of issues you want addressed and the seller will not budge on any of them, that also may be a sign that you may not want this boat unless you’re willing to pay for the repairs.

Finally, if the market value in the report is significantly below the purchase price, you may have a problem. If you’re financing, your bank may not go forward. You may have a deeply flawed boat which is reflected in the estimated value, and that’s a good bullet to dodge

Use the Survey

Most surveys have a list of findings, and this list of findings is your first work list on your new sailboat. You know most of what is wrong with your new boat before you ever sail it.

Most surveyors are happy to take questions about their surveys and discuss their findings even after a survey, so are a valuable resource for you with your new boat.

William

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What A Yacht Broker Can Do For You

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Especially when buying or selling a large boat, the right broker can reduce stress and make the transaction go smoothly and painlessly.

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A broker can take the complications out of buying or selling your next boat. (Photo: Michael Vatalaro)

When BoatUS member David Issacson bought his first boat 26 years ago, he searched the newspaper classifieds in the morning (remember those?), located a couple of candidates before noon, and by 3 p.m. wrote the seller a check for $1,000 for a 17-foot boat he took fishing that day. "It was so simple then," he says. "Pretty much like buying a cheap used car. I don't even think I got a bill of sale. It was all done with a handshake." Now that he's retiring, he's looking for his fourth boat, which he says will be much bigger, probably in the 42- to 45-foot range. "I have no idea what it's going to take now. I've never had a boat that was documented or had a loan on it. I don't even think they have classifieds in the paper anymore, and I'm not sure what the process is these days."

Issacson is exactly the type of person who could benefit from using a boat broker. Boat brokers are similar to real-estate agents, but with important differences: They're far less regulated, and their commission is 10 percent rather than six percent. Unlike realtors who must take classes, sit for an exam, and be licensed in every state, only boat brokers in Florida and California have to be licensed and only California requires an exam. In most other states, anyone can call themselves a boat broker. And while all brokers have certain legal responsibilities to their clients, selecting one should be done carefully. Ask around at your marina or boatyard and get referrals from others who have used a broker before. Talk to two or three and get a feel for them, just as you would with a real estate agent. One way to increase your chances of finding the right broker is to look for a Certified Professional Yacht Broker (CPYB). These brokers are members of the Yacht Brokers Association of America (YBAA), have taken a comprehensive exam, have pledged to abide by a code of ethics, and will work with the BoatUS Dispute Mediation Program (see links in sidebar).

If You're Selling

There are several advantages to using a broker, the biggest of which is exposure. Plastering "For Sale" signs in yacht clubs and marinas can't equal the power of a broker's listing, especially with larger boats that have a smaller pool of buyers who may not even be in the same state. Brokers typically list boats through websites such as Yachtworld, which is easily searchable by anyone, anywhere in the world. Only brokers can list boats on the site, which functions much like the Multiple Listing Service for real estate agents.

Here's How A Broker Can Help

If you're the seller, a broker will:.

  • Advertise your boat. Brokers should list your boat on Yachtworld and advertise in other places where appropriate. Find out what their marketing plan is and get it in writing.
  • Price your boat realistically. Brokers have access to recent sale prices and know a good starting point.
  • Prescreen responses to advertising. This will avoid most tire kickers.
  • Show your boat to prospective buyers. This will save you from wasting time with buyers who don't show up.
  • Communicate all offers from potential buyers to you.
  • Negotiate the selling price. This is where brokers can really earn their money.
  • Draw up sales agreements and accept deposits. Many brokers can do this electronically over computers, tablets, and even smartphones.
  • Arrange for sea trials and schedule surveys.
  • Coordinate closing.
  • Transfer funds to you. Now you can start shopping for your next boat.

Correctly pricing a boat is critical to getting it sold, and an experienced broker has a very good idea of what a boat will sell for and can price it accordingly. Brokers typically have access to what similar boats have sold for in the local area and they'll prepare a listing based on the kind of boat and type of buyers expected. They'll take photos, write an enticing description, and recommend things to improve the look and marketability of your boat. Brokers can also help you navigate some of the more confusing aspects of selling such as corporate ownership, loan payoffs, bills of sale, and other documents needed for transferring ownership. Aside from listing and advertising the boat, their most important job is helping move the process along once a buyer is found. Brokers can also help a buyer obtain financing and assist with changing the USCG documentation. While the 10-percent commission is usually not negotiable, brokers will sometimes discount it for a sale that might be falling apart because of a survey report or other defects found on a boat. The different listing contracts used by brokers can be confusing, but they're not complicated once you understand the two main types, a central agency agreement and an open listing agreement.

A central agency agreement (sometimes called an exclusive listing) means you've hired a specific broker to sell your boat. With this type of agreement, the broker typically lists your boat on Yachtworld and — this is important — is obligated to sell it through a co-brokerage arrangement. Co-brokerage means that if another broker finds a buyer for your boat, your broker agrees to split the commission with him. This incentive to help each other is why about 70 percent of all brokerage sales are co-brokered. Keep in mind, though, with this type of agreement, even if you bring in the seller or end up donating your boat, you'll still be liable for the broker's commission. The majority of brokerage sales are central agency agreements.

An open listing agreement means you've given more than one broker the right to sell your boat and you also retain the right to sell it on your own. The disadvantage is that because no broker is guaranteed at least a part of the commission, it's not very likely any of them will spend the money to list your boat on Yachtworld or pay for other advertising. There can also be confused communications between multiple brokers and potential buyers. On the other hand, a hungry broker may be more motivated to bring you a buyer because he would get the entire commission. With this type of agreement, if you find your own buyer, you don't owe anyone a commission. For either type, don't be pressured into signing for a longer term than you're comfortable with. Six months is typical, but don't be afraid to ask for less, though a broker typically needs at least a couple of months to generate interest. Usually, you can walk away from any contract after giving 30 days notice. Most agreements automatically renew, so give notice before that if you want to cancel. No matter what kind of listing, ask for biweekly progress reports.

Selling It Yourself

For Sale By Ow ner (FSBO) certainly sounds attractive. Not only do you pocket 10 percent more than if you used a broker, but you're in charge of the whole process. Selling it yourself has drawbacks, however. You won't be able to get the same kind of national exposure a broker can, and you'll be responsible for keeping the boat in top condition and available for showing. And, because most boat shopping occurs on weekends, expect to be tied down during your time off. Finally, like many others, you may simply dislike negotiating. But if you want to save some serious money, BoatUS can help. Our thousands of online classified listings are viewable by anyone, anywhere in the world, and we offer an escrow service that takes the anxiety out of the financial part of the transaction. We also offer members full documentation service, boat financing, comprehensive insurance, and on-water and roadside towing coverage.

If You're Buying

While owners may find the process of selling to be an anxious one, buyers are looking for their next dream boat and are likely to be enjoying looking around, trying to find the perfect fit. But buyers tend to get apprehensive once it comes to plunking down hard cash. This is where a broker can make the process less stressful. Brokers should have a separate bank account for holding deposits and there should be wording in the contract specifying what the sale is contingent upon as well as how and when the money will be returned if the sale falls through.

It's important to remember that the broker in a typical sale is getting paid by and working only for the seller, not the buyer. A broker will try to get the highest possible price (that's what his commission is paid from) and will try to sell his client's boat even if it's not necessarily the best deal for you. You're on your own with negotiations and paperwork advice. You can, however, enter into an agreement with a broker through a buyer's broker arrangement. A buyer's broker will represent you, not the seller. Once they know what you're looking for, they can scour their sources and suggest likely boats for you to view, assist in negotiating a price, and help with the paperwork. Typically, a buyer's broker gets a commission split from the seller's broker so there's no cost to you, but read the agreement before signing.

When it's time to seriously consider a boat, it will need to be hauled out and surveyed — something that's usually paid for by the buyer, though as with anything in a sale, that's negotiable. Never use a surveyor recommended by the broker or seller; it's critical to hire an independent, qualified surveyor (see links, below) who has no stake in the outcome. Not only will the survey uncover needed repairs and deficiencies, it will also establish a fair market value, all of which can be used for negotiations. It will almost certainly be needed for financing and insurance as well.

Useful Links

  • Finding a Certified Professional Yacht Broker
  • Find a Marine Surveyor
  • BoatUS USCG Documentation Service
  • BoatUS Financing
  • BoatUS Insurance
  • Find out if a Florida Broker is licensed

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Charles Fort

Contributing Editor, BoatUS Magazine

Charles Fort is BoatUS Magazine's West Coast Editor. He often writes local news items for BoatUS Magazine's Waypoints column and contributes to Reports, in-depth tech features in every issue written to help readers avoid accidental damage to their boats. He is a member of the National Association of Marine Surveyors, he's on ABYC tech committees, and has a 100-ton U.S. Coast Guard license. He lives in California.

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About YachtBroker.org

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The member listing service (MLS) is a database established by some of the industry’s leading professional yacht broker associations to collect & provide data about vessels for sale and is exclusively for yacht sales professional use.  The MLS allows brokers from around the world the ability to share their vessels for sale with other professionals in an effort to maximize the marketing exposure while minimizing time on market.

While there are many segments to the global, “leisure craft” industry; for the purposes of sales within the MLS, we are breaking it into 3 dealer/brokerage segments based on the types of vessels/listings specialized in.

  • Firms locally or geographically specific offering smaller boats (often on trailers) and/or boat dealers with boats on a lot up to about 50’.
  • Brokers and Dealers with 25 to 99 ft listings (mid-market) with a local or national scope and a limited international presence.
  • Brokers and builders representing superyachts (vessels over 100 ft) that may require extensive knowledge during global transactions and respective regulations.

While every broker may aspire to sell a large yacht, not every company is equipped to service the marketplace. Consequently, it has been requested that our membership be offered an “Authorized Superyacht Member” designation to help create a policy over how superyacht listing data is shared among the entire MLS community.  Currently…

  • “Available for Co-Brokerage” listing’s basic specs and images are currently shared with ALL active MLS members.
  • All Media (Videos, Virtual Tours, Location Map, PDFs, External Links) are NEVER shared with co-brokerage regardless of size (Unique Content)
  • Custom Fields are NEVER shared with co-brokerage regardless of size (Unique Content)
  • Questions below assume the listing is “Available for Co-Brokerage”

Sharing Listing Data with Co-Brokerage Websites for Yachts 99 Feet or Less

Sharing listing data with co-brokerage websites for yachts over 100 feet, sharing listing data with advertising websites.

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Sharing Survey Results with Boat Owner or Broker?

  • Thread starter JoLin
  • Start date Dec 11, 2008

JoLin

Vice Admiral

  • Dec 11, 2008

Had a survey performed on a Bayliner that I decided to pass on due to a saturated transom. The broker had been away on business and returned today. I spoke to him and told him I planned to pass on the boat. He asked me if I would mind faxing him a copy of the survey when I get it, to add to the file he has on the boat. At first I thought, sure... but then I thought, "Wait a minute. That survey cost me $300. If he or the owner want one, they can buy their own." I sidestepped the subject and hung up with him. What would you do? I'm very tempted to offer him a copy for $150.  

Lieutenant Junior Grade

JoLin said: then I thought, "Wait a minute. That survey cost me $300. If he or the owner want one, they can buy their own." Click to expand...

mthieme

mthieme said: I would offer it to him for $500. take it or leave it Click to expand...

Re: Sharing Survey Results with Boat Owner or Broker? LOL I was just thinking that your time and effort is worth something. That and they are willing to make a profit off of you. But then again, at this point it's just a worthless piece of paper to you.  

dingbat

Supreme Mariner

Re: Sharing Survey Results with Boat Owner or Broker? I?m not sure what the issue is with you giving him a copy? How much do you think a survey is worth to a broker that states that the transom is shot? Why not save the next prospective buyer some grief?  

Re: Sharing Survey Results with Boat Owner or Broker? did the broker share his 'file' with you?...even if he did, what value would it have for you? get whatever you can, can't hurt to ask.  

a70eliminator

Re: Sharing Survey Results with Boat Owner or Broker? He probably wants a copy just so he has a list of what he needs to hide from the next guy.  

Re: Sharing Survey Results with Boat Owner or Broker? Seems to me a saturated transom isn't a hard thing to figure out, especially for someone that deals with boats everyday.  

tashasdaddy

tashasdaddy

Honorary moderator emeritus.

Re: Sharing Survey Results with Boat Owner or Broker? it is your to do with as you wish. line the bird cage, or sell it to them, throw it in the trash.  

Petty Officer 1st Class

Re: Sharing Survey Results with Boat Owner or Broker? I agree with the above comments about him wanting to hide the bad stuff. I wouldn't give it to him for free though. I'd tell him somewhere between 150-200 though I doubt he'll pay. He's probably just trying to get something for free. Wouldn't hurt to ask though.  

Re: Sharing Survey Results with Boat Owner or Broker? I too agree that if the guy wants a copy he should split the cost with you. You paid for the survey, you are the only one entitled to it.  

Bob_VT

Moderator & Unofficial iBoats Historian

Re: Sharing Survey Results with Boat Owner or Broker? If the broker finds you another boat explain you want your man to survey it and the broker can flip the bill..... then he can have the survey you paid for. It is barter material in my book.  

  • Dec 12, 2008
dingbat said: I?m not sure what the issue is with you giving him a copy? How much do you think a survey is worth to a broker that states that the transom is shot? Why not save the next prospective buyer some grief? Click to expand...
mthieme said: Seems to me a saturated transom isn't a hard thing to figure out, especially for someone that deals with boats everyday. Click to expand...

Seaman Apprentice

Re: Sharing Survey Results with Boat Owner or Broker? I would not even sell it to the dealer. Yes they want it to help sell the boat. If you give it to them, that is a $300.00 savings on their part. Would they do it for you? You have told them the problems with it. Did they offer to pay for it before the survey was done? It's a way of making you pay for their profit. If you are considering the boat to others, file it for comparison for yourself. If you are not satisfied with the boat. Shred it and look for another.  

JoLin said: If I thought the next buyer would see it, I'd give it up in a heartbeat. I have no faith in any of these guys. After I shared the problem with him (the transom was totally saturated to the left of the outdrive, for a distance of about 8 inches out- the rest of the transom showed normal meter readings), he tried to tell me that it could be because the boat was in the water all summer- "you could take another reading in the Spring". Huh?!? Click to expand...

Woodnaut

Chief Petty Officer

jay_merrill

jay_merrill

Re: Sharing Survey Results with Boat Owner or Broker? I think your instincts were correct but I'll add another dimension - your surveyor probably wouldn't want you to give the broker a copy under any circumstance. If I were a surveyor, part of my contract would be a prohibition against reselling or giving the provided information away to anyone who could be a potential customer to me.  

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USGS Friday's Findings - June 28, 2024

From the surface to the deep: assessing biodiversity in offshore marine environments with edna.

Title:  From the Surface to the Deep: Assessing Biodiversity in Offshore Marine Environments with eDNA

Date:   June 28, 2024, at 2:00-2:30 pm Eastern/11:00 -11:30 am Pacific 

Speaker:  Alexis Weinnig, Postdoctoral Researcher, Eastern Ecological Science Center at the Leetown Research Laboratory

At a time when environmental degradation is outpacing efforts to survey extant biodiversity, environmental DNA (eDNA) sequencing offers a powerful application for biomonitoring. Given the potential to identify organisms throughout the Tree of Life, the addition of environmental DNA (eDNA) monitoring systems as a complement to traditional field surveys is anticipated to form a vital cornerstone of a comprehensive marine ecosystem observation network. As part of the  Deepwater Horizon  oil spill Natural Resource Damage Assessment Mesophotic and Deep Benthic Communities (MDBC) Coral Propagation and Habitat Assessment and Evaluation projects, eDNA samples were taken at nine mesophotic reef sites in the Pinnacles Trend and DeSoto Rim areas to complement and inform restoration investments for coral communities in the northern Gulf of Mexico (GOM) and provide the necessary baseline characterization to disentangle natural versus human-impacted seasonal shifts in biodiversity.

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“Despicable”: Brokers, landlords accused of racial discrimination 

Fair Housing Justice Center used undercover testers in Brooklyn, Staten Island

Lawsuit Accuses Brokers, Landlords Of Racial Discrimination

A fair housing group is suing two real estate brokers and three landlords in Brooklyn and Staten Island, alleging that they discriminate against Black renters.

The Fair Housing Justice Center sued Juda Niayzov and Alevtina Ioffe of Broooklyn-based Exclusive Properties Realty and landlords Amina Ali, Nderim Demirovic and 202 Marine LLC after launching an undercover investigation that used testers to inquire about apartments.

Niayzov consistently treated the Black testers worse than white ones, made derogatory comments about Black people during showings and said that one Staten Island neighborhood had “Italians, nice white people,” according to the complaint filed last week in federal court.

“Niayzov made shocking, despicable comments to the white testers when he thought it was ‘safe’ to do so, putting his racial bigotry on vivid display,” the suit alleges. The brokers conspired with the landlords to discriminate based on race , the suit claims.

The brokers did not respond to a request for comment. The landlords could not be reached for comment.

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The investigation began after a Black couple from Staten Island, Stanley Felix and Patricia Delone-Felix, submitted an offer to Niayzov for an apartment listing and were rejected. Niayzov told them the reason was that the owner had bad experiences renting to Black tenants, according to the suit.

The couple, who are plaintiffs in the lawsuit, reported the experience to the fair housing nonprofit, which then launched the investigation.

Niayzov was late for viewing appointments with the Black testers, ignored their texts and calls, and asked for extra documentation before submitting an application, the suit claims. Meanwhile, white testers were allegedly shown more listings and offered rent discounts.

“Flagrant racist statements, like those alleged in this complaint, are shocking, hateful and devastating to hear,” Fair Housing Justice Center executive director and general counsel Elizabeth Grossman said in a statement. “They are yet another example of why the New York metro area remains so highly segregated.”

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Elektrostal

Elektrostal Localisation : Country Russia , Oblast Moscow Oblast . Available Information : Geographical coordinates , Population, Altitude, Area, Weather and Hotel . Nearby cities and villages : Noginsk , Pavlovsky Posad and Staraya Kupavna .

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Elektrostal Demography

Information on the people and the population of Elektrostal.

Elektrostal Population157,409 inhabitants
Elektrostal Population Density3,179.3 /km² (8,234.4 /sq mi)

Elektrostal Geography

Geographic Information regarding City of Elektrostal .

Elektrostal Geographical coordinatesLatitude: , Longitude:
55° 48′ 0″ North, 38° 27′ 0″ East
Elektrostal Area4,951 hectares
49.51 km² (19.12 sq mi)
Elektrostal Altitude164 m (538 ft)
Elektrostal ClimateHumid continental climate (Köppen climate classification: Dfb)

Elektrostal Distance

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Elektrostal Sunrise and sunset

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DaySunrise and sunsetTwilightNautical twilightAstronomical twilight
8 June02:43 - 11:25 - 20:0701:43 - 21:0701:00 - 01:00 01:00 - 01:00
9 June02:42 - 11:25 - 20:0801:42 - 21:0801:00 - 01:00 01:00 - 01:00
10 June02:42 - 11:25 - 20:0901:41 - 21:0901:00 - 01:00 01:00 - 01:00
11 June02:41 - 11:25 - 20:1001:41 - 21:1001:00 - 01:00 01:00 - 01:00
12 June02:41 - 11:26 - 20:1101:40 - 21:1101:00 - 01:00 01:00 - 01:00
13 June02:40 - 11:26 - 20:1101:40 - 21:1201:00 - 01:00 01:00 - 01:00
14 June02:40 - 11:26 - 20:1201:39 - 21:1301:00 - 01:00 01:00 - 01:00

Elektrostal Hotel

Our team has selected for you a list of hotel in Elektrostal classified by value for money. Book your hotel room at the best price.



Located next to Noginskoye Highway in Electrostal, Apelsin Hotel offers comfortable rooms with free Wi-Fi. Free parking is available. The elegant rooms are air conditioned and feature a flat-screen satellite TV and fridge...
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Located in the green area Yamskiye Woods, 5 km from Elektrostal city centre, this hotel features a sauna and a restaurant. It offers rooms with a kitchen...
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Ekotel Bogorodsk Hotel is located in a picturesque park near Chernogolovsky Pond. It features an indoor swimming pool and a wellness centre. Free Wi-Fi and private parking are provided...
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Surrounded by 420,000 m² of parkland and overlooking Kovershi Lake, this hotel outside Moscow offers spa and fitness facilities, and a private beach area with volleyball court and loungers...
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Surrounded by green parklands, this hotel in the Moscow region features 2 restaurants, a bowling alley with bar, and several spa and fitness facilities. Moscow Ring Road is 17 km away...
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Philippines demands China return rifles and pay for boat damage after hostilities in disputed sea

The Associated Press

June 19, 2024, 7:32 AM

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MANILA, Philippines (AP) — The Philippine military chief demanded Wednesday that China return several rifles and equipment seized by the Chinese coast guard in a disputed shoal and pay for damage in an assault he likened to an act of piracy in the South China Sea.

Chinese personnel on board more than eight motorboats repeatedly rammed then boarded the two Philippine navy inflatable boats Monday to prevent Filipino navy personnel from transferring food and other supplies including firearms to a Philippine territorial outpost in Second Thomas Shoal, which is also claimed by Beijing, according to Philippine officials.

After a scuffle and repeated collisions, the Chinese seized the boats and damaged them with machetes, knives and hammers. They also seized eight M4 rifles, which were packed in cases, navigation equipment and other supplies and wounded a number of Filipino navy personnel, including one who lost his right thumb, two Philippine security officials told The Associated on Tuesday.

The two officials spoke on condition of anonymity because of a lack of authority to discuss the sensitive conflict publicly.

“We are demanding that the Chinese return our rifles and our equipment and we’re also demanding that they pay for the damage they caused,” Gen. Romeo Brawner Jr., head of the Philippine armed forces, said in a news conference in western Palawan province, where he pinned a medal on the wounded navy officer.

“They boarded our boats illegally and seized our equipment,” Brawner said. “They’re now like pirates with this kind of actions.”

Armed with long knives and machetes, the Chinese coast guard personnel tried to beat the unarmed Filipinos, who resisted with their bare hands by parrying the blows and pushing back the Chinese, Brawner said. “Our objective is also to prevent war.”

China blamed the Philippines for the confrontation, saying the Filipino personnel “trespassed” into the shoal in defiance of its warnings.

“This is the direct cause of the incident,” Foreign Ministry spokesperson Lin Jian said in Beijing. “The Chinese coast guard at the scene has taken professional law-enforcement measures with restraint aimed at stopping the illegal supply mission by the Philippine vessels and no direct measures were taken against the Philippine personnel.”

The United States renewed a warning Tuesday that it is obligated to defend the Philippines, a treaty ally.

Second Thomas Shoal, part of the disputed Spratly Islands, has been occupied by a small Philippine navy contingent aboard a grounded warship that has been closely monitored by China’s coast guard and navy in a yearslong territorial standoff. China claims the South China Sea virtually in its entirety.

There is fear that disputes in the South China Sea, long regarded as an Asian flashpoint, could escalate and pit the United States and China in a larger conflict. Aside from China and the Philippines, Vietnam, Malaysia, Brunei and Taiwan have also been involved in the increasingly tense standoffs in the busy waterway.

Since last year, hostilities between China and the Philippines have escalated in the disputed waters, particularly in Second Thomas Shoal , which is less than 200 nautical miles (370 kilometers) from the Philippine coast and where the BRP Sierra Madre, now encrusted with rust, was deliberately grounded in 1999 to create a territorial outpost. The ship remains an actively commissioned military vessel, meaning an attack on it could be considered by the Philippines as an act of war.

Copyright © 2024 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.

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2024 Bottom Longline Survey in Photos

Our survey see sokme pretty incredible things while working in the Gulf of Maine. From marine mammals, fish, and birds, to gorgeous sunrises and exciting moments, here are some of the sights and scenes they were treated to in 2024.

Our Cooperative Gulf of Maine Bottom Longline Survey is now in its 10th year of collecting fisheries data in rocky bottom habitat. While working with our region’s commercial fishing community to collect this data, they get to see and experience some amazing things. Here are some of the incredible moments they captured in photos

Learn more about the 2024 survey season in our scientists’ blogs

Last updated on 06/14/2024

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VIDEO

  1. Lifting a Najad 361 for survey

COMMENTS

  1. Why Use a Broker to Help You Buy a Boat

    Making an Offer on a Pre-Owned Boat - A professional broker can help you decide on a realistic offer that increases the chances of buying a pre-owned boat for a fair and reasonable price, and with the necessary elements to protect your interests. Your broker prepares an Offer to Purchase for your signature. It should spell out the terms of ...

  2. Tips from a Marine Surveyor: Avoid These Yacht-Buying Pitfalls

    Prepping a boat for a survey can be involved, and brokers know the ropes: all the systems should have been turned on, the batteries should be charged, etc. If a boat has been untouched for months (or years!) until the marine surveyor arrives, a lot of their limited time can be wasted on last-minute repairs and troubleshooting systems.

  3. Understanding Boat Surveys: What is Pre-Purchase?

    This is the toughest question of all. Some surveyors use a flat rate based on the length the boat, while others use an hourly rate. Either way, a pre-purchase survey will cost somewhere around $20 per foot, but it will be higher on large and complex (or older) boats. In some cases, it may be less.

  4. Boat Surveyors: A Buyer's Guide To Boat Surveys And ...

    Some surveyors may have a flat rate for their time, especially for smaller and simpler boats. Others may charge per foot of boat length, which ranges $18-25/ft. Some surveyors will charge a portion of their per-foot time for travel to and from the vessel. The location and age of the boat may also affect survey pricing.

  5. Yacht Survey Partners

    Yacht Survey Partners are global superyacht survey and technical specialists undertaking a range of marine surveys on motor and sailing yachts over 40 metres. ... We are often retained to undertake condition surveys, either to assist Owners and Brokers in preparing a yacht for sale, or to assist Owners and yacht managers in planning a major ...

  6. 10 Things You Need to Know About a Marine Survey

    5. Attend the inspection. I don't mind having someone look over my shoulder and I like having the ability to show a client the wet spot in the deck, or how the thud feels when tapped with a hammer in the delaminated spot. But don't overdo it; leave the kids and the dog at home. 6.

  7. Marine Surveys and Surveyors

    Boat surveys fall into several categories including: Condition and Value (C&V) surveys. Insurance C&V surveys. Appraisal Surveys. Damage Surveys. New Yacht Surveys. Condition and Value Surveys and Insurance C&V Surveys. Condition and Value surveys are the most common type of boat survey, and are performed when you're buying a used boat.

  8. Marine Surveyors

    The BoatUS Marine Insurance Program will accept value surveys or pre-purchase surveys from surveyors with a SAMS designation of "AMS" with a specialized classification of "Y-SC" (yacht and small craft) or NAMS designation of "CMS" with a specialized service code of "A" (yacht and small craft). It's appropriate to ask the surveyor you select ...

  9. Marine Surveys and Surveyors

    Many people choose a boat surveyor via a recommendation from a broker, seller, or lender, while others depend on word of mouth. In some cases, lenders or insurance companies maintain lists of approved surveyors they trust. ... How much does a boat survey cost? Pricing varies in different areas, but as a general rule of thumb plan on spending ...

  10. How to Sell Your Boat with a Yacht Broker

    Buyers pay for the surveys and for hauling the boat out of the water for inspection. Your yacht broker will usually attend the sea trial and marine survey and help you determine how any discovered deficiencies should be addressed in the purchase negotiations. For more about surveys, read 10 Things You Need to Know About a Marine Survey.

  11. Boat Survey: What It Is, Who Pays, Do I Need to Spend the Money?

    The buyer is responsible for paying for a marine survey, as they are the ones undertaking the 'risk' of purchasing a used boat. Whether or not the boat is bought via a broker, there is unlikely to be recourse if, after purchase, issues are found with the boat. It is the responsibility of the purchaser to ensure they have done due diligence ...

  12. Boat Dealers And Brokers: Tips For Boat Buyers

    Make sure the broker is excellent with communications and organization because both will be needed when it comes to doing the sea trial (test drive) and survey of a pre-owned boat. Don't let a broker talk you out of a survey. Ask the broker for a history of a chosen model. They should be able to access more information on anything sketchy.

  13. 8 Things A Marine Surveyor Wants You To Know

    Make Sure The Boat Is Prepared. If you are asking a surveyor to come to your boat to perform an insurance survey, make sure that the surveyor has access. Don't expect him or her to empty out lockers of heavy anchors, bags of sails, and boxes of spare parts. The surveyor needs to look at the mechanical parts of the boat, and it causes delays to ...

  14. The Superyacht Survey Process

    Survey planning. Obviously the time needed for the survey will vary depending on a number of factors, but our approach is to scale our team to complete our survey on even the largest yacht (and we regularly work on yachts from 40 metres up to 160 metres or more) within 5 working days. Occasionally the survey might need to be split into two ...

  15. How much does a boat or yacht survey cost?

    Boat brokers. Using a yacht broker is a simple solution for surveying your yacht. The broker acts as a trusted intermediary who puts his technical, nautical and commercial skills at your service, with the aim of accurately assessing the condition of the yacht, its history and its market value. The intervention of a broker guarantees a fair and ...

  16. How To Get A Sailboat Surveyed

    A sailboat survey report should include: Details about installed engines and generators, including model numbers, serial numbers, and engine hours. Listing of hardware found, and its condition and operating state. Observations and notes on the general condition of the boat cosmetically.

  17. What A Yacht Broker Can Do For You

    Brokers can also help you navigate some of the more confusing aspects of selling such as corporate ownership, loan payoffs, bills of sale, and other documents needed for transferring ownership. Aside from listing and advertising the boat, their most important job is helping move the process along once a buyer is found.

  18. Superyacht Brokerage Survey

    Superyacht MLS Survey. The member listing service (MLS) is a database established by some of the industry's leading professional yacht broker associations to collect & provide data about vessels for sale and is exclusively for yacht sales professional use. The MLS allows brokers from around the world the ability to share their vessels for ...

  19. Sharing Survey Results with Boat Owner or Broker?

    Dec 11, 2008. #1. Had a survey performed on a Bayliner that I decided to pass on due to a saturated transom. The broker had been away on business and returned today. I spoke to him and told him I planned to pass on the boat. He asked me if I would mind faxing him a copy of the survey when I get it, to add to the file he has on the boat.

  20. City Firms Don't Have an Answer for the FCA on Workplace Sexual

    Hundreds of UK banks, brokers and insurers missed a deadline to respond to the financial watchdog's survey on sexual harassment and bullying in the City, suggesting that firms are struggling to ...

  21. USGS Friday's Findings

    Title: From the Surface to the Deep: Assessing Biodiversity in Offshore Marine Environments with eDNADate: June 28, 2024, at 2:00-2:30 pm Eastern/11:00 -11:30 am Pacific Speaker: Alexis Weinnig, Postdoctoral Researcher, Eastern Ecological Science Center at the Leetown Research Laboratory

  22. Lawsuit Accuses Brokers, Landlords Of Racial Discrimination

    Fair Housing Justice Center's Elizabeth Grossman with 518 West Caswell Avenue, 2732 East 65th street in Brooklyn, 202 Marine Avenue in Brooklyn Jun 19, 2024, 7:00 AM By

  23. Elektrostal, Moscow Oblast, Russia

    Elektrostal Geography. Geographic Information regarding City of Elektrostal. Elektrostal Geographical coordinates. Latitude: 55.8, Longitude: 38.45. 55° 48′ 0″ North, 38° 27′ 0″ East. Elektrostal Area. 4,951 hectares. 49.51 km² (19.12 sq mi) Elektrostal Altitude.

  24. Boat Insurance: Get a Quote Online

    And, we drop the common requirements and restrictions other insurers may force on you. For example, we don't require a marine survey to purchase your policy, which could cost around $600 for a 30-foot boat. Get a boat insurance quote from Progressive so you have the protection you need to get on the water right away.

  25. Elektrostal, Russia: All You Must Know Before You Go (2024

    A mix of the charming, modern, and tried and true. See all. Apelsin Hotel. 43. from $48/night. Apart Hotel Yantar. 2. from $28/night. Elektrostal Hotel.

  26. Elektrostal

    In 1938, it was granted town status. [citation needed]Administrative and municipal status. Within the framework of administrative divisions, it is incorporated as Elektrostal City Under Oblast Jurisdiction—an administrative unit with the status equal to that of the districts. As a municipal division, Elektrostal City Under Oblast Jurisdiction is incorporated as Elektrostal Urban Okrug.

  27. France's far-right National Rally projected to win snap election

    Marine Le Pen's anti-immigration, eurosceptic National Rally party, known as RN, would win 235 to 265 seats in the National Assembly, a huge jump from its current 88 but short of the 289 needed ...

  28. US business owners seek higher insurance coverage as AI, election risks

    Artificial intelligence and U.S. election have emerged as significant risks to businesses this year with an overwhelming 80% of owners worried their insurance will not cover a specific loss, a ...

  29. Philippines demands China return rifles and pay for boat damage ...

    MANILA, Philippines (AP) — The Philippine military chief demanded Wednesday that China return several rifles and equipment seized by the Chinese coast guard in a disputed shoal and pay for ...

  30. 2024 Bottom Longline Survey in Photos

    Photo Gallery 2024 Bottom Longline Survey in Photos. Our survey see sokme pretty incredible things while working in the Gulf of Maine. From marine mammals, fish, and birds, to gorgeous sunrises and exciting moments, here are some of the sights and scenes they were treated to in 2024.